#1
whats a good key to wirte a metal song in i tried c ionian but i just kept getting hard rock like solos so im not sure, i think it might do bette if it had the flats
#2
Try using minor/harmonic minor types of things to begin with.

If you are in E standard tuning, for example try E minor.
D standard, try d minor, for example.

Just a quick very broad overview/reply for ya before i head out
#3
I think d major is pretty good if you use drop d
Quote by RetroGunslinger
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#5
kk i was using A aeolian/minor(c ionian) nd it didnt sound right im gonna try it with e minor thnks
#6
Quote by F8iscruel
kk i was using A aeolian/minor(c ionian) nd it didnt sound right im gonna try it with e minor thnks


If certain things don't sound right, it's because the chords don't suggest certain modes and therefore you'll be playing out of key. Don't think in terms of modes at first; they're not keys, so you can't say "what key, I tried C Ionian". In that case, just go with C major.
#7
Quote by :-D
If certain things don't sound right, it's because the chords don't suggest certain modes and therefore you'll be playing out of key. Don't think in terms of modes at first; they're not keys, so you can't say "what key, I tried C Ionian". In that case, just go with C major.


I see where you are coming from with the whole key/mode thing, but in the end isnt major/ionian the same thing, just like minor/aeolian...
#8
Quote by Aus-10
I see where you are coming from with the whole key/mode thing, but in the end isnt major/ionian the same thing, just like minor/aeolian...


Nope, and that's exactly what screws people up. You have to realize that key-based music was invented centuries after music was being composed; it was a way to fix the rigidness of modal music. If you're working in the key of C major, for example, you can throw in any chromatic notes you want and still be in key. However, with the Ionian mode you're restricted to working with the seven notes of the mode, that's it. Same with minor/Aeolian.

The chording in modes is far more limited as well; usually modes have one or two chord vamps because they're harmonically unstable. The Ionian and Aeolian modes have specific chords that will imply the mode. For example, common Ionian chords are maj6 and maj7, and a common Aeolian chord is m7b13. If you work with these chords you'll be in the mode, but stray from that vamp and the music will naturally resolve itself back to the original key.

This is why, unless you're going for the feel of a specific mode, it's much easier and less limited to think in terms of key-based music.

Does that clear anything up?
#9
Maybe try a Phrygian(in key of C this would be E). Though it will really depend on the progression.
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#10
Try sticking some tritones in your song, too. They sound evil (a long time ago, like, in the Middle Ages, they were banned from music for being "the Devil's Interval.") A tritone is an augmented fourth, a diminished fifth, and three whole steps (those are all the same thing, really, but I just wanted to say it in as many ways as possible so you'd recognize at least one.)