#1
Lately when trying to put in little improv licks between changes or trying out solo chord-melodies, i find that I'm at a disadvantage. I'm still learning Jazz and I find the more regular guys locked within certain positions(unless they're soloing of course) So instead of asking those guys and possibly embarrassing myself I'll ask here:

I'm usually all over the place to suite my style of playing or I use kinda "made-up" positions suiting style/song. But again, Jazz styles are new to me and I can't "think Jazz" on the spot(yet ). Either that or I use classical positions for classical(duh) and whenever those work better.

So what box-thinking is most conducive for simplistic chord-melodies? Is it CAGED or what?

I've also tried to base my positions off of arpeggiations(sp?) which seems closest but I still don't know.
Hope I asked it clearly.

Disclaimer: This is not a "how do I improvise in Jazz" question. Just thought I'd mention that.
Gear:
Inflatable Guitar
Digitech GSP 2101/Mosvalve 962/Yamaha S412V
My Imagination
#2
if you are going to box at all for jazz (which you really shouldnt) you should used Caged.
My sig used to be so awesome it got me banned
#3
Quote by Your_Dad
if you are going to box at all for jazz (which you really shouldnt) you should used Caged.
I guess caged huh...also, remember I'm talking about this in a specific application, not soling or improv.
Gear:
Inflatable Guitar
Digitech GSP 2101/Mosvalve 962/Yamaha S412V
My Imagination
#4
Quote by KryptNet
Lately when trying to put in little improv licks between changes or trying out solo chord-melodies, i find that I'm at a disadvantage. I'm still learning Jazz and I find the more regular guys locked within certain positions(unless they're soloing of course) So instead of asking those guys and possibly embarrassing myself I'll ask here:

I'm usually all over the place to suite my style of playing or I use kinda "made-up" positions suiting style/song. But again, Jazz styles are new to me and I can't "think Jazz" on the spot(yet ). Either that or I use classical positions for classical(duh) and whenever those work better.

So what box-thinking is most conducive for simplistic chord-melodies? Is it CAGED or what?

I've also tried to base my positions off of arpeggiations(sp?) which seems closest but I still don't know.
Hope I asked it clearly.

Disclaimer: This is not a "how do I improvise in Jazz" question. Just thought I'd mention that.


The standard patterns are fine, and are not genre specific. Ultimately it would be helpful to be able to see the arpeggio shapes within those patterns.

Jazz is really a matter of style. the patterns on the neck arent any different. You dont need a different approach to learning them based on style. - just learn the style.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Mar 26, 2008,
#5
I also like to do a lot of little scalar walk-ups with three chord voicings. I had a piece in jazz combo that had a Cmaj7 (the shell voicing) held out for eight beats moving into a measure starting on a Gm7. The melody didn't go anywhere during that time either, so I just figured that a little walkup would be good to do. I played this using three chord voicings, sticking within the C major scale almost exclusively:

Cmaj7->Dm7->Em7->Fmaj7->Em7->Dm7->Cmaj7->Abmin7->Gm7

I used a little scalar motion to create a chord walkup, and then used the Abmin7 to set up a little tension and resolve it on the next beat. I find walkups to be a good technique when you're looking for a chord melody.

Is this anything like what you're looking for?
#6
^^Hey, I'll have to try that. Walking guitar line. But i guess I was getting myself confused over this stuff. I think what's happening is that I've kinda foolishly after playing rock lead so long I have some weird trained muscle memory that moves around(the fretboard) too much. So I think I need to train myself in certain "in box" licks and movement so I can play restrictively as to not be out of position for common jazz chord progressions. Common being the key word here. It's nice when I can just write the voicings in ways that suite my style. but comp is...comp.

but someday...I'll be telling others what to play. muhahaha.
Gear:
Inflatable Guitar
Digitech GSP 2101/Mosvalve 962/Yamaha S412V
My Imagination
#7
CAGED is the standard way to develop scale muscle memory.

You just have to remember not to let boxes box you in.