#1
Since power chords arent really chords, how is music with power chords interesting at all? I think I've figured out that without realizing it, a lot of people who write music with power chords are really playing arpeggios and triads in the form of power chords. For example, if you put your guitar into drop D, then play the notes in your d minor chord in the form of power chords, d power,a power, and f power, it sounds good to play a d minor scale over. its sort of like a bass, where instead of playing chords, you play the individual notes in the chord. but in this case though, you play the individual power chords.
Last edited by 360freak at Mar 26, 2008,
#5
Well a power chord is 1 and 5. Which has awesome potential because of it's ambiguity in tonal centers for the lack of the 3rd....so, i mean I guess I don't understand what you meant by arpeggios and triads and playing a d minor scale. You need to clarify.
Gear:
Inflatable Guitar
Digitech GSP 2101/Mosvalve 962/Yamaha S412V
My Imagination
#6
Quote by 360freak
Since power chords arent really chords, how is music with power chords interesting at all?


You answered your own question right there. Because the chord is tonally ambiguous due to the absence of a third, it leaves a lot of room to create a certain feel with your melodies and solos.
#7
Power chords, as said already, lack anything to tell you whether they are minor or major. Usually, when you come up with a melody over it, it will (in what scale it uses) imply what the chords are. Usually if I come up with a chord progression I like, once I've come up with a melody I go back and flesh out the chords with the appropriate type of 3rd (but doing so definitely does change the sound).
#8
Quote by KryptNet
Well a power chord is 1 and 5. Which has awesome potential because of it's ambiguity in tonal centers for the lack of the 3rd....so, i mean I guess I don't understand what you meant by arpeggios and triads and playing a d minor scale. You need to clarify.


what i was saying with that was, dont you think it would be better to think of power chords as individual notes rather than chords? like of you were to play the individual notes of a triad in power chords.
#9
Quote by 360freak
what i was saying with that was, dont you think it would be better to think of power chords as individual notes rather than chords? like of you were to play the individual notes of a triad in power chords.


If you play the notes of a triad separately (such as 1 3 5 or 1 b3 5) you're playing an arpeggio. That wouldn't be a power chord.

I feel like I'm still missing your question though.
#10
Quote by 360freak
what i was saying with that was, dont you think it would be better to think of power chords as individual notes rather than chords? like of you were to play the individual notes of a triad in power chords.
so like saying take your d triad, play power chords like D-A, F-C, A-E?...so like suggest a Dm9...or...that chord arpeggiated with no b7?oh wait...like think of of it as like key of dmin: 1 - 5 - 3 - 1 - 4 - 2 melody? oh wait...saying we should call them power-intervals? wait...no...now you've honestly lost me. stop messing with my brain 360freak!!!
Gear:
Inflatable Guitar
Digitech GSP 2101/Mosvalve 962/Yamaha S412V
My Imagination
#11
Quote by KryptNet
so like saying take your d triad, play power chords like D-A, F-C, A-E?...so like suggest a Dm9...or...that chord arpeggiated with no b7?oh wait...like think of of it as like key of dmin: 1 - 5 - 3 - 1 - 4 - 2 melody? oh wait...saying we should call them power-intervals? wait...no...now you've honestly lost me. stop messing with my brain 360freak!!!



I'm glad it's not just me then that didn't understand what the hell was being asked or said.
#12
^I understood his question as I've wondered about it before myself. As far as his point...not a clue what he's saying.