#1
Ok so does anybody actually understand the whole numeric thing when it comes to music theory? Here's the issue I'm having, and I'll try to break it down as simply as possible.


Let's say I want to play a C major scale. Using W W H W W W H, I find that the notes are:

C D E F G A B C

Makes sense. Now, according to a music theory book I've got, the pattern for the major scale is:

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 1

Which also makes sense. So it nicely ends up like

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 1
C D E F G A B C


Now this is where it starts to not make sense to me. Let's say you wanna play C# major. The notes are different, but the pattern should be the same. Using W W H W W W H again to find the notes, this is what I get:

C# D# F F# G# A# C C#
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 1

????
Now how does it make sense? If F is 3, and f# is 4, I mean it just doesn't work in any meaningful way. What does each number even mean then? If it alternates between half notes and whole notes with no explanation, it doesn't even make sense. Can anybody figure out what the meaning of this is?
#2
Quote by yoursweatersux


Now this is where it starts to not make sense to me. Let's say you wanna play C# major. The notes are different, but the pattern should be the same. Using W W H W W W H again to find the notes, this is what I get:

C# D# F F# G# A# C C#
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 1


That should be:

C# D# E# F# G# A# B# C#

Edit: oops left out a sharp.
#3
|___________________________________|  octave

|________________________________|  major seventh

|_____________________________|  minor seventh

|__________________________|  major sixth

|_______________________|  augmented fifth/minor sixth

|____________________|  perfect fifth

1     2     3  4     5     6     7  8

C  C# D  D# E  F  F# G  G# A  A# B  C

1     2     3  4     5     6     7  8

|__|  minor second

|_____|  second

|________|  minor third

|___________|  major third

|______________|  perfect fourth

|_________________|  augmented fourth/diminished fifth

|___________________________________|  octave

|________________________________|  major seventh

|_____________________________|  minor seventh

|__________________________|  major sixth

|_______________________|  augmented fifth/minor sixth

|____________________|  perfect fifth

1     2     3  4     5     6     7  8

C# D  D# E  F  F# G  G# A  A# B  C  C#

1     2     3  4     5     6     7  8

|__|  minor second

|_____|  second

|________|  minor third

|___________|  major third

|______________|  perfect fourth

|_________________|  augmented fourth/diminished fifth
#4
Quote by yoursweatersux

Now how does it make sense? If F is 3, and f# is 4, I mean it just doesn't work in any meaningful way. What does each number even mean then? If it alternates between half notes and whole notes with no explanation, it doesn't even make
sense. Can anybody figure out what the meaning of this is?


^ See above diagram. There is only a 1/2 step between E & F and B & C.
That is probably what confused you.

You'd also write the C# scale using E# and B#. Even though those are the same
tone as F and C, they are still considered as sharps of those base notes.
#5
E# always confused me when I was first learning music theory because up until that point, I had always been told that there is no such thing as B#, Cb, E#, Fb.
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#6
Quote by highwaysalmon
E# always confused me when I was first learning music theory because up until that point, I had always been told that there is no such thing as B#, Cb, E#, Fb.
They're not common, but they exist and music be used to write the C# major scale.