#1
well im getting my room redone (after 5 years of the paint peeling and holes appearing) and my dad was thinking of soundproofing it, only for the floor at the moment so it fits under a regular carpet, is this possible? and also which materials would i need to buy (ie what brands, what type of foam etc)

thanks
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#3
sound proof it, im not looking to record, just to keep the sound in the room by the way i have no idea about any of this acoustic treatment or soundproofing
Jackson KE 3 Trans Black
Schecter C7 ATX
Siggery Custom


Axe Fx Owner
#4
did you say you're just doing the floor? i didn't really get that but if that's what you mean, you'll get a little sound reduction but because there are so many places the sound can escape, it won't be soundproof in the least but hey its a start.
#5
yeah, my parents what as less sound coming from my room as possible (play guitar, heavy metal stuff which they hate) just sound reduction really to be honest
Jackson KE 3 Trans Black
Schecter C7 ATX
Siggery Custom


Axe Fx Owner
#6
damn man, that's going to be a construction project and a half.... Honestly, you're not going to get anything to do that job that can be applied under the carpet. The only REAL way(and it won't be as effective as you like), is to put acoustical sound batt in the joist bays within the floor framing itself. That means ripping out drywall of the ceiling below and re-drywalling it....
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#7
After-Construction Soundproofing
Step 1:
Remove the drywall from one side of the walls to be soundproofed. (Strip the side of the wall that strikes a balance between offering the most work space and causing the least amount of damage.) Then choose one of the options listed in Section 1.

Step 2:
Alternatively, cut small holes in the drywall near the ceiling, between the studs. Fill the space between the drywall with blow-in paper or expandable foam insulation. You can rent the machine for applying blow-in insulation at most lumberyards or rental centers, or where you purchase your materials. Expandable foam can be purchased in small spray cans or large containers that resemble propane tanks for your barbecue grill. Patch and refinish the drywall.

Step 3:
As another alternative, hang manufactured wall covering materials (described in step 5 above) over the existing walls (as opposed to behind the drywall). Many come in a variety of colors or are paintable (you'll pay more for the "finished" products than you will for the kind that go on behind the drywall). These products take up very little space and work well. Choose from panels, acoustic matting and vibration barriers.

Soundproofing Windows, Ceilings and Floors
Step 1:
Install double- or triple-hung vinyl-framed windows in new construction, or replace old windows with upgraded units in existing rooms.

Step 2:
Or make "plugs"–—custom-fit coverings the size of the window, made from one of the manufactured products described above. You can make these yourself by purchasing the material and cutting it to fit.

Step 3:
Alternatively, purchase stylish sound-deadening drapes. These are more expensive than window plugs but much more pleasing to the eye.

Step 4:
Soundproof ceilings by applying sound-deadening matting (as described above) or hanging a suspended acoustic tile ceiling; extra sound dampening can be obtained by rolling out batts of thick fiberglass insulation on top of the suspended ceiling.

Step 5:
Apply sound-deadening mats to upstairs floors to cut down on noise levels. These can be applied under carpeting and often have padding built in.