#1
hey, I just switched the strings on my Jackson dk2m from gauge 10's to 9's, now I'm totally confused:

1. I've heard the bridge needs to be level with the body, but does it need to run level the full length of it?

Because if it runs the full length of the bridge, the action is way too high if you see what I mean...

And how do I actually set-up the action properly, I recently got a fixed bridge guitar setup and the action is great, its really low, close to the fretboard but doesn't buzz at all, and the strings are still reasonable tight, how would I go about this on a Floyd?

Really need help folk, it's driving me nuts.
#2
you've only changed to 9 its not the end of the world, dont change anything.
#3
there are screws on either side of the bridge (fairly close to the outside) that raise and lower the action. If you open up the back of the guitar, the screws that hold the springs to the actual wood of the guitar adjust spring tension, which can raise and lower the angle of the bridge to the body. Do some tweaking with these screws and see what works for you.
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#5
Quote by COBHC728
there are screws on either side of the bridge (fairly close to the outside) that raise and lower the action. If you open up the back of the guitar, the screws that hold the springs to the actual wood of the guitar adjust spring tension, which can raise and lower the angle of the bridge to the body. Do some tweaking with these screws and see what works for you.



Doing this can affect your tuning though so you can do it like this:

1)Do as the guy directed above
2)Proceed to turn the screws by a half turn, no more. If the bridge is too high, ie if it is towards the guitar's body, then screw the screws clockwise.
3)Then check your tuning as turning the screws knocks your original tuning out of place. If it still not level, do it again, half turn at a time.
4)Keep doing this until it is parallel with the body, just around the cavity that holds the bridge itself.
5)If the bridge is facing upwards, ie, the back part is resting into the routing section, then turn the screws respectively, in the same way as above, but the opposite direction (anti clockwise). Thus slackening the springs, letting the bridge fall back into a steady position.
#6
Uhuh I know this, but what I'm asking is does the whole length of the floating bridge need to run parellel to the body, or is it just the end of it?

Because, if it all must run parallel then you cannot adjust the action using the two screws at either end.
#7
Right now te floating bridge runs parallel to the body, but tehe strings are wayy too far away from the body, and the tension is pretty dodgy, how do i sort it?