#1
I am tabbing out the Hyrule Field theme from Twilight Princess for fun and have all of the different instrumental lines completed. However, I have absolutely no idea what key this particular piece is in. There seems to be so much chromaticism throughout the song that it is hard to determine. Here are a list of some of the chords used (in order) of the first section.

Em7 - F#m/E - Fmaj7 - Bbmaj7 - B7


....

I have noticed that the melody is constructed of the notes of each individual chord as it is played, as well. Is it possible to not play in any particular key or mode? What would this be called?

EDIT: Or would this piece be modal and the writer is constantly changing between various modes?
Last edited by Paquijón at Mar 26, 2008,
#2
1) The first 2 chords suggest D-major(2 shaprs) but the last two suggest Fmajor (1 flat); its impossible to have those 5 chords in the same key

2) It is possible to not play in a key / mode and they call this atonal or post-tonal music

3) It could be modal and have rapid changing of keys/modes and rapid changes between them, but I'd call it atonal and get it done with.
#4
Quote by Jeno Webb
1) The first 2 chords suggest D-major(2 shaprs) but the last two suggest Fmajor (1 flat); its impossible to have those 5 chords in the same key

2) It is possible to not play in a key / mode and they call this atonal or post-tonal music

3) It could be modal and have rapid changing of keys/modes and rapid changes between them, but I'd call it atonal and get it done with.


Its more likely to use Polytonal Chromaticism. Atonal music generally needs to have each note played the same amount of times to avoid establishing a tonal center. Polytonal chromaticism is when a composer uses more than one mode, hence the prefix poly-. This allows for full use of the chromatic scale, while still having a tonal center.
#5
Quote by isaac_bandits
Its more likely to use Polytonal Chromaticism. Atonal music generally needs to have each note played the same amount of times to avoid establishing a tonal center. Polytonal chromaticism is when a composer uses more than one mode, hence the prefix poly-. This allows for full use of the chromatic scale, while still having a tonal center.
Thanks actually. I've been trying to figure out what that's called.