#1
What is chromaticism? Or something like that. I heard Dimebag Darrell used it alot and was wondering what tis is.
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#2
Basically its playing notes out off the key your playing over.

To do this you pass over them quickly and always end a phrase on a note thats in key (called a landing point) You get a kinda outside sound.

Check out a guy called Brett Garsed for a more obvious example.
#5
Keep in mind that chromaticism refers to consecutive half steps moving in a certain direction; notes out of the key not part of some sort of semitonal sequence are accidentals.
#6
I'll kinda have to disagree with you there :-D A lot of chromatic movement is as you describe like chromatic modulation is usually always half-step motion to a non-diatonic.

But the way Dimebag is using it, and the way the word is understood, chromatic is simply the opposite of diatonic.

If you played an E# in the key of C, this would be a chromatic tone. It would be called an accidental note on paper.

Chromaticism is then the opposite of diatonicism. In describing a song, a person could say "there is a lot of chromaticism in Dimebag's solo" or can be used like "Bach was one of the first to truly incorporate chromaticism effectively" and so on. Long explanation for an easy topic. Sorry.
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#7
Quote by KryptNet

Chromaticism is then the opposite of diatonicism. In describing a song, a person could say "there is a lot of chromaticism in Dimebag's solo" or can be used like "Bach was one of the first to truly incorporate chromaticism effectively" and so on. Long explanation for an easy topic. Sorry.


There are many things that are "opposites" of diatonicism. Nonatonicism, Octatonicism, Heptatonicism (Of which diatonicism is a form), hexatonicism, pentatonicism, and chromaticism.

I had always thought that chromaticism strictly required the playing of a succession of semitones. I would agree with =D in that chromaticism should refer to actually playing a succession of semitones, whereas accidentals should be non-scale tones (regardless of whether or not they are in a semitonal sequence).
#8
Quote by isaac_bandits
There are many things that are "opposites" of diatonicism. Nonatonicism, Octatonicism, Heptatonicism (Of which diatonicism is a form), hexatonicism, pentatonicism, and chromaticism.

I had always thought that chromaticism strictly required the playing of a succession of semitones. I would agree with =D in that chromaticism should refer to actually playing a succession of semitones, whereas accidentals should be non-scale tones (regardless of whether or not they are in a semitonal sequence).



right, its consecutive half steps. C,C#,D,D#..... to play those 4 notes in order is to use chromaticism.

Also the term "accidental" refers to the notation that represents those non scale tones.... the tones themselves are not accidentals.
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#9
Quote by GuitarMunky
right, its consecutive half steps. C,C#,D,D#..... to play those 4 notes in order is to use chromaticism.

Also the term "accidental" refers to the notation that represents those non scale tones.... the tones themselves are not accidentals.


Aren't they accidental tones?
#10
Quote by isaac_bandits
There are many things that are "opposites" of diatonicism. Nonatonicism, Octatonicism, Heptatonicism (Of which diatonicism is a form), hexatonicism, pentatonicism, and chromaticism.

I had always thought that chromaticism strictly required the playing of a succession of semitones. I would agree with =D in that chromaticism should refer to actually playing a succession of semitones, whereas accidentals should be non-scale tones (regardless of whether or not they are in a semitonal sequence).

I wouldn't say those are opposites, they're contrasting types of tonicism. I'm talking if north was diatonic, then south would be chromatic.

Playing a succession of semitones would be more accurately described as chromatic movement. or even using the chromatic scale, flight of the bumblebee etc.

Chromaticism as a musical term is not limited to describing successive half-steps in melodies. Chromaticism is also used to describe harmonies.
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#11
Quote by KryptNet
I wouldn't say those are opposites, they're contrasting types of tonicism. I'm talking if north was diatonic, then south would be chromatic.

Playing a succession of semitones would be more accurately described as chromatic movement. or even using the chromatic scale, flight of the bumblebee etc.

Chromaticism as a musical term is not limited to describing successive half-steps in melodies. Chromaticism is also used to describe harmonies.


I would rather use the analogy of. If diatonicism are regular heptagons, than chromiticsm is regular dodecagons, pentatonicism is pentagons (both regular and irregular), heptatonicism is heptagons (both regular and irregular) etc...

I could be wrong about the whole chromatic vs. accidental thing though.
#12
Quote by isaac_bandits
Aren't they accidental tones?


Well the term accidental, refers to the symbols (sharp, flat, natural), not the tones themselves.

Example:

If you were in the key of E minor, but are using the raised 7th on the V chords ( as in harmonic minor), an accidental would be placed in front of the note, (since its not in the key signature). The note itself is not the accidental... the symbol is.
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Last edited by GuitarMunky at Mar 27, 2008,
#13
I'm talking if north was diatonic, then south would be chromatic.


I would think that, by having one tonic, or being diatonic, that then the polar opposite would be the lack of any tonic, that is, atonal serialism. Chromatic and diatonic melodies/harmonies are similar in that there is still a tonal hierarchy (tonal in the sense of individual tones, not tonality).

I think that the "what is" of chromaticism has been sufficiently answered, but what it's uses are for have not been sufficiently expounded upon. Chromaticism, as I understand, can only exist within a tonal context and are used primarily for two reasons which are closely related. The first and simplest use is that of a coloring effect. In rock context you'll see it in the form of leading tones which land on the aforementioned target tone. This form of chromaticism is used solely for an embellishing effect. The second use is for that of the distant modulation. Dimebag Darrel, if he did use chromaticism, would have likely used it for the first reason.
#14
Quote by Erc
I would think that, by having one tonic, or being diatonic, that then the polar opposite would be the lack of any tonic, that is, atonal serialism. Chromatic and diatonic melodies/harmonies are similar in that there is still a tonal hierarchy (tonal in the sense of individual tones, not tonality).

I think that the "what is" of chromaticism has been sufficiently answered, but what it's uses are for have not been sufficiently expounded upon. Chromaticism, as I understand, can only exist within a tonal context and are used primarily for two reasons which are closely related. The first and simplest use is that of a coloring effect. In rock context you'll see it in the form of leading tones which land on the aforementioned target tone. This form of chromaticism is used solely for an embellishing effect. The second use is for that of the distant modulation. Dimebag Darrel, if he did use chromaticism, would have likely used it for the first reason.


That's good, and chromatic tones can also be used as non-harmonic tones (passing tones, neighbour tones, echapees, appoggiatura, anticipations, and suspensions).