#1
yeah, well... me and my band played our first gig about a week ago, and i got tons of compliments, but everyone came with the same comment "we couldn't hear the bass" or " the guitar was too loud and there were part were i could here your voice" so... what i need to know is, how high should each instrument should be?

Here are the band member roles
Vocals (baritone)
Bass
Rhythm Guitar
Lead/Back-up guitar
Back-up vocals (almost mezzo-soprano)
Drums (power drums=no microphones)

Thanks in advance
░░▓▓▓▓▓░░░░░
▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓░░
▓▓▓▓▓░░░░
▓▓▓▓▓▓░░
▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓
▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓░ It's a-me, Mario!
░░▓▓▓▓▓▓▓░░░

Check out my
Tumblr
Or follow me on Twitter
#2
Vocals (baritone)-8
Bass-4
Rhythm Guitar-5
Lead/Back-up guitar-8
Back-up vocals (almost mezzo-soprano)-6
Drums (power drums=no microphones)-7

Of course this is just a general thing, try not to choke up your mids like Metallica did and make sure their is some sonic room for your bass player. Off course make sure their is some difference in tone (more trebal?) between your Rhythm and Lead guitars.

Like in a normal recorded album your vocals will be loudest while the drums would be after that trackwise. General thing, if anyone knows better please don't choke me to death!
#3
alright thats good, but i got second question now.
should there be like change of volume half-way through the song (like maybe in a chorus) so the vocals can be heard? kinda like in teen spirit by nirvana?
░░▓▓▓▓▓░░░░░
▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓░░
▓▓▓▓▓░░░░
▓▓▓▓▓▓░░
▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓
▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓░ It's a-me, Mario!
░░▓▓▓▓▓▓▓░░░

Check out my
Tumblr
Or follow me on Twitter
#4
What kind of music do you play? That makes a big difference. Lead guitar should not be equal in volume to vocals in most genres, you're going to get terrible guitar solo wanky bias on the UG forums

Pure volume isn't necessarily the problem either. Proper equing is key for each instument "cutting" through the mix. Does your bass player dime his bass and zero his/her mids for example? That's the fastest way to drop him/her out of the mix.... Is the EQ on the lead singer emphasized in ranges similar to those emphasized on lead guitar? bye bye vocals. I'll say that proper equing is at least as important as relative volume levels, it not only lets all the instruments be heard, it also cleans up the mix.

edit*
Quote by JosephBerger
alright thats good, but i got second question now.
should there be like change of volume half-way through the song (like maybe in a chorus) so the vocals can be heard? kinda like in teen spirit by nirvana?


this is broadly called dynamics... one of the most important aspects of music, of course you should change your volume level throughout your songs to place emphasis where it needs to go.
#5
and it also depends on the venue, if its live. some venues have a better PA system than others, but with a good sound tech, there should be no hassles, but u dont always get a good sound guy. not only that, some venues can just sound plain crap!

u might wanna try using a mic wen u jam, and record what u play from a distance(so u may wanna use a condensor mic, depending on how loud u play) just so u can get an idea of what u sound like, and make adjustments from there
Quote by happytimeharry
Man, I would challenge their band to a duel, not a musical one though. I'm talking maces and swords and shit.
#6
cool, well we play mostly green day/foo fighter/nirvana songs
and one last question, i was told once that every instrument is suppoised to have its own amplifier AND all the instruments have to be connected to another amplifier where every instrument is connected. is this true?

p.s. sorry i didnt post sooner- we had a black out... anyway im off to work, ill be back around 6
░░▓▓▓▓▓░░░░░
▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓░░
▓▓▓▓▓░░░░
▓▓▓▓▓▓░░
▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓
▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓░ It's a-me, Mario!
░░▓▓▓▓▓▓▓░░░

Check out my
Tumblr
Or follow me on Twitter
#7
Quote by JosephBerger
cool, well we play mostly green day/foo fighter/nirvana songs
and one last question, i was told once that every instrument is suppoised to have its own amplifier AND all the instruments have to be connected to another amplifier where every instrument is connected. is this true?

That called a PA system and mixing desk.
You don't neccesarily need all that, just a vocal PA and learn to get your levels right. But a full PA will have each of you going through a channel (apart from drummers, who go through several channels) of a mixing desk, which is basicaly a set of inputs with volume, bass, treble and middle on each of them that all goes to one big amp and a couple of speaker stacks.
So once you have everyone going through this big amp with all these volume controls, you can 'mix' the out front sound a lot easier.
For this job, it's always best top have a seperate 'sound engineer' who can listen to you and ajust your mix while you play.
#8
Just turn around the gain knob 2-3 times on everything man....
That'll be just right...

or maybe go the Motorhead way...
Just turn all the knobs to max!
#9
Quote by af_the_fragile


or maybe go the Motorhead way...
Just turn all the knobs to max!

Apart from the bass, which is all the way off, well.... Lemmy's stack is set up like that anyway.
#10
wicked thanks to everyone!
░░▓▓▓▓▓░░░░░
▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓░░
▓▓▓▓▓░░░░
▓▓▓▓▓▓░░
▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓
▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓░ It's a-me, Mario!
░░▓▓▓▓▓▓▓░░░

Check out my
Tumblr
Or follow me on Twitter
#11
For Selective volume boosts, that is, being able to change your volume onstage, Decibel boosters are a good choice BBE makes the Boosta Grande, which all it is, is a pedal that will make your guitar louder when activated, just set your amp to a lower level so when you need it to be quieter, it will be, and when you need a boost(i.e. a solo) or keep it on normally and when you need it a little quieter, deactivate it. If a PA is involved, a little Soundguy trick is when a band member asks to be turned up, and it's not possible without sounding muddled, try adding mid in increments of 3 to cut through.
Quotation is a serviceable substitute for wit- Oscar Wilde