#1
kay I am checking out guitars and there is this one company that my guitar teacher mentioned named "Harstrom" I belive but I am not positive. I know that the guitarist for foucs on "moving waves" played one.
so what is it called?
#2
Hagstrom?


Check out the Suedes and the Super Suedes.


Great guitars.
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#3
Yeah, Hagstrom's are nice. The only person I know who plays one is Ben Curtis from Secret Machines.
#4
yea hagstrom. Ia am looking into em and anyone know a good model that sounds good for 60s-70s music? I have to play it though a mesa/boogie lonestar too.
#5
Quote by H4T3BR33D3R
Hagstrom?


Check out the Suedes and the Super Suedes.


Great guitars.

It's Swede, but other than that...

Elvis played a Viking.
#6
Hagström, it's called. Swedish company that made guitars that closed their factory in the eighties and reopened a few years ago in China, I think. The new ones are not even close to the old ones, but they're pretty good. I tried a Swede and a Super Swede a few days ago, they felt great and sounded good. If you're looking for guitars in that pricerange, consider them, in my opinion they're much, much better than Epis and such.
"Your signature can not be longer than 250 characters."

How you know you have too many guitars...

Apparently once also known as PonyFan #834553.
#7
Agreed, the original Hagstroms were built to equal Gibson, Framus etc. These days they're certainly superior to your average Epiphone, but the name itself was only revived to give a bit of weight to yet another 'budget' brand. The Sound City amplifier name has got exactly the same treatment, and there's a few other well-known brands too.
#8
Quote by kyle62
Agreed, the original Hagstroms were built to equal Gibson, Framus etc. These days they're certainly superior to your average Epiphone, but the name itself was only revived to give a bit of weight to yet another 'budget' brand. The Sound City amplifier name has got exactly the same treatment, and there's a few other well-known brands too.

Epiphone, for example? A once great brand bought up and turned into a line of cheap copies?
#9
Anyone know if I should look into the re-issues or the vintage originals for better playing/sound and stuff?
#10
A lot of people like the originals because they're into the vintage/heritage thing, but I have read from many people that have played both, that the reissues are as good, and maybe even better, than the old ones.

I think the originals that you will find will vary in quality, maybe just because of the passage of time, whereas the reissues are more likely to be all consistently good.

I have a Swede and I'm happy with it, and if you do some searching you'll find that the reviews of the Hagstrom reissues are overwhelmingly positive. Most people you talk to will tell you that they are as good as many much more expensive guitars, and they certainly beat the hell out of Epiphones.

I have posted reviews in other threads, but the short version is: great quality construction, beautiful finishes, great tone, amazing neck and fretboard, a joy to play. On the downside, they're heavy. They look a little different from other LP-type guitars, so you have to decide for yourself if you like the look or not.

--- D
#11
Vintage Hagstrom necks are as close to indestructible as a guitar neck could be during that time period. If you're looking for "60's/70's music" it would kind of make good sense to get a guitar from that era, however I'm going to agree with Duster. I've not played a bad 'current production' Hagstrom.
ESP LTD EC-256 and a Fender Deluxe VM
#12
I've heard they easily compete with Epiphone Elitist. I played a Swede about a year and a half back at a guitar show. It's action was set a bit high, but it had a really smooth playing neck. Nice punchy pickups, high quality finish, and the hardware seemed really nice. Where are the current ones made anyway?
#13
Quote by smb
Epiphone, for example? A once great brand bought up and turned into a line of cheap copies?
Good call - Epiphone are one of the oldest and most respected string-instrument builders, at least until they were bought out by the big G. They won't rest until they're the only musical instrument manufacturer left in the world, I think.
#14
Quote by CJRocker
I've heard they easily compete with Epiphone Elitist. I played a Swede about a year and a half back at a guitar show. It's action was set a bit high, but it had a really smooth playing neck. Nice punchy pickups, high quality finish, and the hardware seemed really nice. Where are the current ones made anyway?


That can be true, and according to their website they have "the fastest neck on the planet". I think they're made in China, but maybe that's not only bad? Keeping the prices down. The fretboard is made of resinator wood, what I think is some sort of wood-composite, it feels like really good ebony. I'm gonna try a Swede or Super Swede again soon.

I know on of the guitarists in the Swedish hardrock/heavy-metal-band Mustasch uses a Super Swede, so they must be very good for the price. And at my school they have an old one, that has been beaten the hell out of by all the students under a long time and it still works fine.
"Your signature can not be longer than 250 characters."

How you know you have too many guitars...

Apparently once also known as PonyFan #834553.
#15
The Hagstroms are all made in China. But that is quickly losing its negative connotation. Lots of Chinese instruments are good. The Hag definitely is.

The Resinator fretboard is a composite material that is actually really good.

--- D