#1
A#, B, C#, D, E, F, Gb, A#


And is it possible to have a sharp and a flat in the same scale when you make it diatonically correct (as above)?

I had
A#, B, C#, D, E, F, F#, A#
before I corrected it...

Thanks
#2
F# is the same note as Gb.
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#3
Quote by lazlow325i
F# is the same note as Gb.

No, it's not, they just sound the same.

TS, you're correct, you can't have the same note appear twice in a scale. It's possible to have a sharp and a flat in a scale, it all depends on the scale formula.
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#4
Quote by steven seagull
No, it's not, they just sound the same.

TS, you're correct, you can't have the same note appear twice in a scale. It's possible to have a sharp and a flat in a scale, it all depends on the scale formula.



actually I dont think there are any key signatures with both a sharp and a flat.
but its true you cant have the same note appear twice. The notes must all be represented by different letter names.

and yeah F# and Gb can be considered the same note.... as in same pitch. its all just a matter of how you want to define the term "note". Im sure he was using the term to note mean pitch, which is very common and perfectly acceptable.
The reason you cant label it F# is because you already have an F.

Quote by iBillyTheKid
A#, B, C#, D, E, F, Gb, A#


And is it possible to have a sharp and a flat in the same scale when you make it diatonically correct (as above)?

I had
A#, B, C#, D, E, F, F#, A#
before I corrected it...

Thanks


it's an "iBillyTheKid" scale
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Last edited by GuitarMunky at Mar 28, 2008,
#5
A#, B, C#, D, E, F, Gb, A# =

Bb(A#)= root
D=3rd
F=5th
Cb(B) = b9
C#=#9
E =#11
Gb=b13


Bb add b9 #9 #11 b13
you could also add Ab (the dominant 7th )
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#6
Sorry maybe I wasn't clear, I don't know the root note of the scale, it could be any of them, I just wondered if it fits in with any modes?


I know Gb is F#, I just made the scale diatonically correct, (including all notes from A to G)

Thanks
#7
Quote by iBillyTheKid
A#, B, C#, D, E, F, Gb, A#


And is it possible to have a sharp and a flat in the same scale when you make it diatonically correct (as above)?

I had
A#, B, C#, D, E, F, F#, A#
before I corrected it...

Thanks

Starting on B you would have B, C#, D, E, F, Gb, A#
So 1, 2, b3, 4, b5, bb6, 7.

Starting on C#: C#, D, E, F, Gb, A#, B
1, b2, b3, b4, bb5, 6, b7

Starting on D: D, E, F, Gb, A#, B, C#
1, 2, b3, b4, #5, 6, 7

Starting on E: E, F, Gb, A#, B, C#, D
1, b2, bb3, #4, 5, 6, b7

Starting on F: F, Gb, A#, B, C#, D, E
1, b2, #3, #4, #5, 6, 7

Starting on Gb: Gb, A#, B, C#, D, E, F
1, x2, #3, x4, #5, #6, 7

Weird. In other words, that's a long way of saying "I have no idea what this might be called."
#8
Quote by GuitarMunky
actually I dont think there are any key signatures with both a sharp and a flat.
You want, but G Harmonic Minor uses both the sharp and the flat symbol: G A Bb C D Eb F#. You would write that scale in the key of G minor, 2 flats, and use an accidental whenever F# appears. That was the first question I asked here in MT, if the F# would be included in the signature (it isn't). Man that was a long time ago, probably a year before we even started Scale of the Week...and that's old!!!


Anyway, the scale in question contains three consecutive half steps in the E F Gb lick. Standard Western scales don't allow that, so it is a synthetic scale, a nonstandard scale that you made up. I second calling it the "Billy the Kid" scale.