#1
I've almost completely lost my passion for playing electric guitar

I've played for 10 years, 8 of which I've played metal for the most part. I love metal, I love listening to it and I can write plenty of awesome riffs for my band - but playing it has just stopped doing it for me. I'm not guitarded, that's for sure, but I'm going to go ahead and blame my inability to play like someone that's played as long as I have should be able to. I'm slack, I don't practice long enough, and my left hand is clumsy as a tit. It's almost depressing watching my band's lead guitarist sweep like a god.

I can play any rhythm stuff you throw at me, but I just SUCK at lead work, and it's getting to me. The past month I've not picked up my electric at all, and have just been playing one song (Drifting by Andy McKee) on my acoustic, nothing else. Surprisingly I'm loving it, it's just a great song to be learning. Today I picked up my electric, played some Opeth and Nightwish and realised how incredibly sick of it I was.

Now here's another thing I think is making me lose it: my gear. I know it sounds materialistic and pretentious, and you'll probably make remarks about the best guitarists starting out on **** gear, but hold up. I have an Epiphone Les Paul Custom and a Roland Cube 60. Now take into account that the top bands on my playlists are Meshuggah, Scar Symmetry, Textures, Tesseract, Nevermore and Dream Theater. Just so happens they all use 7 string guitars. Pretty ****ing hard for me to play anything like that on an Epiphone Les Paul, and it's another reason I can't be bothered even trying to get back into playing the damn thing. That and the amp is ass. After playing the Diezel Einstein - and every other high gain tube out there - I want to run my amp over with an 18 wheeler. The above problem isn't easily solved either. I'm seriously struggling to find a job that doesn't require me to completely drop my university studies and DOESN'T involve flipping burgers; so of course I'm a poor bastard.

So I dunno, I'm basically looking for any ideas or advice that might help me get my electric groove back. I can't just give it up and play acoustic and nothing but, because I've got commitments to a band that I want to - and have to - fulfill.
#2
My advice for you is a simple one. Play different genre's.

Whenever I get sick of practising one thing, I go ahead and play something else. I've been playing alot of jazz and fingerpicking acoustic lately and it's so invigorating. You find yourself really enjoying playing something fresh and new. Also, it WILL help your other playing. Jazz in particular helped my coordination. So just learn to play something you wouldn't normally play, that should do the trick!
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#3
Happened to me already, and I've only played for 4 years...so I got hooked on acoustic and classical for a few months, then picked up the electric again and loved it. I just go through phases, I can't stick to the same thing forever, gotta switch it up every once in awhile (I even pulled out the old keyboard and jimmy rigged it into my amp and sound system...blasting distortion on a ****ty little 20 year old keyboard while playing the lead for Iron Man is just downright awesome).
#4
Meshuggah uses 8 strings and Dream Theater uses seven strings SOMETIMES!

i heard drinking liquids under kitchen sink helps you get back in that groove.

on a more serious note. take a break from it, then eventualy youll see what got you into that metal grove in the first place. take some lessons, theyll help. See some concerts, try to talk to some famous guitarists (not slash or jimmy page famous.. but you get my drift)
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#5
well if u really enjoy music i mean REALLY enjoy playing music as a passion and u cant get a kick out of it any more, but u want to pursue it as a proffession there are two things u can do
A) stop going to school and pursue music full time with ur band
B) give up on guitar till u finish school then go back to it afterwards
actually
C) find a way to save cash up for a new guitar or amp

edit
after seeing what every one above me posted i realize im progessing pretty fast lol
i got bored of electric like 6 month into playing and didnt play electric till three months later (around a few weeks ago) another thing that does give ur enthusiasm for playing a nice needed jot is getting a new guitar, nothing pricy but something that give u a rejuvenation for what u love, i personally got bored of my bc rich semi holo and stop playing it and got an acoustic then i saw the new cheap razorback model and it renewed my passion for electric guitar
Last edited by F8iscruel at Mar 28, 2008,
#6
Try diversifying your playing. Play something completely different from your usual style, just to mix things up a bit. Since it seems you play a lot of technical metal, perhaps try some blues or funk. Go from technicality to feeling and see how much it will 1) make your other playing better and 2) make you appreciate it that much more. Trust me, i've definitely been where you are before, except in the opposite direction. I'm a blues/rock player by nature so i tried some metal and classical music...works like a charm.
#7
well for starters you can broaden your musical horizon. check out the blues and other types of music. start learning more difficult songs and learning their solos, this could enhance your lead playing abilities. as for gear, save up and get some good used gear, its a hell of a lot cheaper than new gear. dont go overboard and buy a 3k guitar, just get some new gear that will excite you when you play it.
#8
Quote by Kurapica
My advice for you is a simple one. Play different genre's.


Aye, it really does help. As I think I mentioned, I dominantly play metal but there's a lot of the other genres on the side. By other genres I mean classical, blues and jazz. I don't even bother with rock and punk as I consider it a step down from metal in terms of playing ability requirements and overall skill development.

Improtant note: this is the song I've been playing that I mentioned. So diversifying my playing isn't really necessary if you consider that apart from metal, this is the sort of music I've played for a very long time.

Quote by mattvl
Happened to me already, and I've only played for 4 years...so I got hooked on acoustic and classical for a few months, then picked up the electric again and loved it. I just go through phases, I can't stick to the same thing forever, gotta switch it up every once in awhile (I even pulled out the old keyboard and jimmy rigged it into my amp and sound system...blasting distortion on a ****ty little 20 year old keyboard while playing the lead for Iron Man is just downright awesome).


A break may be what I need actually, I'm tempted to leave it for a while and see what happens, but I'd seriously fall behind on the practice I need for my band.

Quote by Ultimate_Gio92
Meshuggah uses 8 strings and Dream Theater uses seven strings SOMETIMES!

on a more serious note. take a break from it, then eventualy youll see what got you into that metal grove in the first place. take some lessons, theyll help. See some concerts, try to talk to some famous guitarists (not slash or jimmy page famous.. but you get my drift)

I am well aware of Meshuggah's use of custom 8 string ibanez's, and Dream Theaters occasional use of 6 strings. It's completely beside the point though :P

A break, like I said, might work. Taking lessons will be useless as I'd done that for 6 years and really got going once I quit and learned at my own pace. I go to gigs every weekend. I've met Paul Gilbert, Steve Vai, John Pettruci and many more and heard what they had to say about their guitar playing habits. They have the tools to experiment to their hearts desires, which keeps boredom lightyears at bay.
#9
Quote by Archie2012
A break, like I said, might work. Taking lessons will be useless as I'd done that for 6 years and really got going once I quit and learned at my own pace. I go to gigs every weekend. I've met Paul Gilbert, Steve Vai, John Pettruci and many more and heard what they had to say about their guitar playing habits. They have the tools to experiment to their hearts desires, which keeps boredom lightyears at bay.


Well then I am stumped. I guess a murder-suicide pact may be your only way out.
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#10
Quote by Ultimate_Gio92
Well then I am stumped. I guess a murder-suicide pact may be your only way out.

One of the top ideas on my list is to go on a frenzied rampage through a shopping mall, cutting a bloody path through the crowds of people with a mighty broadsword; all the while with Manowar blaring in my headphones. That ought to rekindle my passion for metal.
Last edited by Archie2012 at Mar 28, 2008,
#11
Try invigorating your playing with something out of your comfort zone. When I get bored of blues-rock or classic rock, I branch out into jazz or country. Even if it's just a short phase - I can carry that feeling of being total **** at a certain style into my comfort zone and apply it. I mean like why not learn a jazz lick, practice it and move it around, and then try and incorporate it into your comfort zone (which I see is metal - a jazz metal solo would be cool!)?
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#12
dude, walkaway, if you are burned out it is the only fix. better yet try another instrument, i went to the bass guitar for a while, i am a rhythm player my self ,metal/classic hardrock, and im good at rhythm, but sucked at lead guitar. going to the bass has helped my guitar playing alot. if you dont want to do that i`d say take a breather dude.
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#13
^^ +1 just take a break. iF you dont wanna play then dont. This happened to me a while back so i took a break and now im back into it.
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#14
Buy yourself a nylon-string guitar, maybe? The tonal difference may be enough to inspire you.
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#15
i think u should get a new amp

and then hit ur cube with a truck

seriously

it might feel good after u get a good tube amp haha
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#16
buy a cheap squier bass. the different sounds will get you into playing different styles, then eventually make you rediscover why you play guitar
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#17
maybe you should practice your lead work, rhythm is fun, but lead work is more fun, learn sweep picking, do left hand exercises to get it back into shape and then you will hopefully be inspired by your new lead playing proficiency and love to play again.

just my 2 cents worth

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#18
Quote by NGMF-Sam
i think u should get a new amp

and then hit ur cube with a truck

seriously

it might feel good after u get a good tube amp haha


Hahahaha, no doubt about it I will a monstrous tube amp by the end of the first half of the year.

I'll put the cube destruction on youtube.

Quote by Wulver
Buy yourself a nylon-string guitar, maybe? The tonal difference may be enough to inspire you.

My first guitar was a nylon string and I was part of a classical guitar ensemble for 5 years. We won bulk awards

I occasionally pick it up these days to play a bit of flamenco, but not as I used to at all.

Quote by an epic mistake
maybe you should practice your lead work, rhythm is fun, but lead work is more fun, learn sweep picking, do left hand exercises to get it back into shape and then you will hopefully be inspired by your new lead playing proficiency and love to play again.

just my 2 cents worth


That's a fair ****ing mission, but quite likely the best solution. I'll hunt for some beginner sweeping exercises tonight.
#19
Quote by Wulver
Buy yourself a nylon-string guitar, maybe? The tonal difference may be enough to inspire you.


That's what I was thinking and then dive into some flamenco.
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#20
TS's situation is why i thank god i love the blues, metal, rock n roll, rockabilly, and bluegrass.
keeps me from getting bored :P
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#21
Don't stop playing, and don't knock punk and rock as a step down. If you're having fun playing it then you are doing what you set out to do in your first post (not be bored of electric).

Learn some Iggy Pop, man, or some Dead Kennedy's
#22
This happens to me sometimes, and taking a break cures it. I find myself trying to hard at a song that I'm not quite ready for, and I have to put it down for a while. One time I stopped playing for 3 solid weeks. When it happens, and I pick it back up, I feel good again. In fact, it just happened like a week ago.

That's why I'd hate to be in a band. If I couldn't put it down every once in a while, I'd end up hating it.
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#23
Quote by Archie2012
I don't even bother with rock and punk as I consider it a step down from metal in terms of playing ability requirements and overall skill development.


That's a pretty ignorant statement to make.
#24
take a break.

youll come crawling back to your guitar eventually
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#25
Quote by Archie2012
Aye, it really does help. As I think I mentioned, I dominantly play metal but there's a lot of the other genres on the side. By other genres I mean classical, blues and jazz. I don't even bother with rock and punk as I consider it a step down from metal in terms of playing ability requirements and overall skill development.

That's probably a big part of your problem to be honest - every thing you don't know has something to teach you. Sure, pop and rock may not generally require the same flat out chops as metal, but in terms of melody, compositional skills and articulation they're just as advanced, if not more so.

Life isn't static though, and you do find yourself falling in and out of things, whether it's friends, relationships or playing the guitar. I've gone through periods of close to a year where I barely touched the thing but I always come back to it eventually...then get really pissed off with how crap I've become

If you don't feel like playing then do some studying. Read up on music history, the evolution of modern guitar playing from the 50's up until now, find out who influenced who and stuff like that. Usually by doing that you'll stumble across all sorts of things you didn't know, songs you've never heard and that tends to prompt me to want to play them, or at the very least listen to them and see where they fit in the big picture.

Likewise you could brush up on some theory - arguably the best way to learn theory is without the guitar so you pay attention to the notes rather than looking at the fretboard.
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#27
Well, take a break, like what everyone said, because don't force yourself to play guitar if you don't feel like it!

Also, work on your lead skills / technique, and then ask your lead guitarist if you can alternate for lead every now and then. It'll put more fun into your band for YOU.

Try some other styles. Classic rock, Blues, Hard Rock, Experimental, Classical, Jazz, and many more styles that you can try!

I play many styles of music, and it helps me keep in interest of guitar. Sometimes you just feel like playing metal, and sometimes you just feel like playing classic rock.
#29
Quote by steven seagull
That's probably a big part of your problem to be honest - every thing you don't know has something to teach you. Sure, pop and rock may not generally require the same flat out chops as metal, but in terms of melody, compositional skills and articulation they're just as advanced, if not more so.

Life isn't static though, and you do find yourself falling in and out of things, whether it's friends, relationships or playing the guitar. I've gone through periods of close to a year where I barely touched the thing but I always come back to it eventually...then get really pissed off with how crap I've become

If you don't feel like playing then do some studying. Read up on music history, the evolution of modern guitar playing from the 50's up until now, find out who influenced who and stuff like that. Usually by doing that you'll stumble across all sorts of things you didn't know, songs you've never heard and that tends to prompt me to want to play them, or at the very least listen to them and see where they fit in the big picture.

Likewise you could brush up on some theory - arguably the best way to learn theory is without the guitar so you pay attention to the notes rather than looking at the fretboard.


I quite like this idea. I was never too into music theory when I had to learn it, but maybe now that I can study it at my own pace things could be more interesting. Musical history that is, I'm quite up to date with music composition and note theory as it is.

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u should play bass guitar cos no one hears them
so u wont AMPLIFY crappyness

How incredibly insightful. You didn't even read past the first line, did you?
#30
Try making electronic music for awhile. Download FruityLoops or whatnot and have at it.
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#31
Quote by nvranka
take a break.

youll come crawling back to your guitar eventually


yep!
#32
Try stopping for awhile
and teach yourself music theory inside and out. When you get bored with that, pick up your axe and start playing again. It will be refreshing. I just started getting into theory and it has taken away practicing time. So the more I don't play, the more a miss it and appreciate it. I guess it comes down to will power. Who the **** cares if you can't shred. If you love playing in a band and playing guitar persue it no matter what. But the theory thing might work. Give it a shot. Just don't stop playing for good.
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#34
This happened to me a while ago, so I delved into acoustic and electronic type instruments (IE keyboards, theremin, etc.). Now that I play electric again it's really brought me back from the brink.
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#35
Quote by p o e
TS's situation is why i thank god i love the blues, metal, rock n roll, rockabilly, and bluegrass.
keeps me from getting bored :P


Same here mate, I play indie, rock, metal, blues, jazz, classical, acoustic, alternative, grunge etc etc etc. It keeps things fresh because when I get bored of one, I flit to another.
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#36
Theres a lot more good lead guitar players out there than good rhythym players. Incorporate single lead notes into your rhythym style don't go overboard. I would much rather have a good rhythym player than a great lead player. I can consider myself a very good lead player but that came at the expense of ignoring rhythym patterns. Also try different styles of music.
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#37
Well I thought I'd try the obvious and threw some new heavy gauge strings on the Epiphone and detuned it to 7 string B standard.

It's worked; I'm having a blast playing through Train of Thought by Dream Theater and writing my own stuff in this tuning. Here's hoping I don't get bored of it :P
#38
1. Listen to more jazz
2. Try playing without a pick for a few days
3. Have a go a slide guitar
4. Go to concerts you wouldn't normally bother with
5. Take the time to get really good at string-bends
6. Randomly modify your guitar
7, Get serious about acoustic


...That sort has stuff has always kept me on my toes and kept the ol' grey matter ticking over. In the last few months I felt myself getting stuck in a 'classic rock, bluesy pentatonic shredding' sort of rut - so a few weeks ago I threw away my plecs, slapped a neck 'bucker into my tele and took up jazz and funk. It's transformed my playing totally and I'm starting to really enjoy guitar more than ever - interestingly, my rock playing has got a lot better too.

If jazz music seems a bit extreme or isn't to your taste try some fusion-y crossover rock stuff - The Grand Wazoo by Zappa is a good'un.
#39
I've been playing for about 5 years now, and probably the last 2 or 3 years solidly, virtually everyday. I started to get in a rut where I either felt like my skill wasn't going anywhere, or that I was always playing the same thing. I still enjoyed playing the guitar everyday, though, but I could see where I might eventually get tired of it.

Spring break came last week, (a guitar-less spring break, mind you) and I started to get worried. Thoughts like, "Oh, my calluses are going to go away!" or, "I'm going to play so much slower when I get back!" So, I had to go about 5 days without any guitar playing.

After the first part of the break, I had about 2 hours between a ski trip in Colorado and a road trip to Missouri, and I was in town. I was desperate, so I stopped at the local Guitar Center for about 40 minutes. It felt as though I had been recharged over those few days away. It also felt like I had regained some creativity. I suppose during the trip, I spent the time listening to old and new music than just playing old music.

I think a solid and complete break can help, a lot.
#40
Follow seagulls advice he's always right :p and ridiculously helpful. What i do is just start building new chops or delve into different genres. If you've got some half decent chops delve into some jazz by Django Reinhardt. He's one of the most inspiring guitarists especially seeing as he had two fingers on his left hang for most of his career.