#1
Hello!

Iv'e been studying theory lately to improve my guitar playing and songwriting. So, I did some research on the construction of major chords. I found out that you should take the first, third and fifth note of your major scale to form the major chord, right?

But I ran in to a problem when I got to the G chord. (in open position played)

The G-major scale is G - A - B - C - D - E - F# I believe. So the major G chord should consist of the notes G, B and D right?
But the first two notes that are fretted for an open G major chord are F# and C? Am I doing anything wrong?
I don't really get it.


And sorry for the bad english.
#3
^ye, you must be confused with the notes on the fretboard . Here's a usful site for chords etc http://www.all-guitar-chords.com/index.php?ch=G&mm=&get=Get
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#6
Here's what you're doing:

You consider the open E string E. Good. Then you go to the first fret. That's obviously E#, right? Well, yes, but there is no note between E and F, so E# is the same pitch as F, so the first fret is F. The next is F# and then the third fret is G.

The note on the A string is B. I have no clue why you think it's C, but it's not.
#7
Quote by bangoodcharlote
Here's what you're doing:

You consider the open E string E. Good. Then you go to the first fret. That's obviously E#, right? Well, yes, but there is no note between E and F, so E# is the same pitch as F, so the first fret is F. The next is F# and then the third fret is G.

The note on the A string is B. I have no clue why you think it's C, but it's not.


I thought he had the second fret on E and the third fret on A, when it should be the other way around.
#8
Quote by Thomaso
Hello!

Iv'e been studying theory lately to improve my guitar playing and songwriting. So, I did some research on the construction of major chords. I found out that you should take the first, third and fifth note of your major scale to form the major chord, right?

But I ran in to a problem when I got to the G chord. (in open position played)

The G-major scale is G - A - B - C - D - E - F# I believe. So the major G chord should consist of the notes G, B and D right?
But the first two notes that are fretted for an open G major chord are F# and C? Am I doing anything wrong?
I don't really get it.


And sorry for the bad english.



Your right, you can derive a Major triad from a Major scale as you described, but as others have mentioned, you need to learn the fretboard better. I always advocate learning to read before you begin to study theory. You need to have some fundamental skills down for theory to make any sense. Learning to read exposes you to the language that music is taught in, and familiarizes you with fretboard. I would consider reading music to be a pre-requisite to studying theory. Too many people jump into theory before they are ready, and as a result make mistakes on simple fundamental issues such as this.

as far as the G chord voicing.


------3---------------------------------------
------0---------------------------------------
------0---------------------------------------
------0---------------------------------------
------2---------------------------------------
------3---------------------------------------

from 6th string to 1st = G,B,D,G,B,G

G triad = G,B,D
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Mar 29, 2008,
#9
Ok! thanks for all the reply!

I really made a huge mistake by simply naming the notes wrong. But it's just kind of confusing for a beginner to learn how scales work and how they are constructed. I think that in my enthusiasm (I finally got it a bit cleared up) I named the notes wrong.

Just another thing..

Where should I be going next when the whole major scale thing is clear to me? Practicing soloing on the major scale or just leave it for a while and learn the minor scale? Any suggestions?

Thanks to all!
#10
Quote by Thomaso
Ok! thanks for all the reply!

I really made a huge mistake by simply naming the notes wrong. But it's just kind of confusing for a beginner to learn how scales work and how they are constructed. I think that in my enthusiasm (I finally got it a bit cleared up) I named the notes wrong.

Just another thing..

Where should I be going next when the whole major scale thing is clear to me? Practicing soloing on the major scale or just leave it for a while and learn the minor scale? Any suggestions?

Thanks to all!
If you learn the major scale correctly, the minor scale and the modes should come easily. So I would suggest trying to look at the fretboard as major scale intervals at this stage.

Also try spelling out major/minor/dim chords in your head.

Take breaks to jam out so that your ear is trained in relation to your brain. All is lost if you don't. And besides, it's fun.
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