#1
my guitar teacher was telling me that most professional players dont tend to use the standard Eshaped and Ashaped barre chords when playing, but instead use alot of partial chords instead. Now he never said they never use them but the prefer playing partial chords or chords that are not the standard barre chord shape. Is there any truth to what he was saying or do you think barre chords are used just as much.
radiantmoon is the toughest person I know. He inflects a sense of impending doom upon any who look upon his stone-chiseled face. The children run out of fear, while the men run for they know that the stories are true.
#3
This really depends on the genre that you're looking at. It's hard to get the tight, percussive effect that is normally used in funk or reggae with 6-string chords. If you're playing an acoustic 3-chord pop song, and you're just strumming, those chords are just fine.

I tend to use either 3 or 4 notes, but it really depends on context. If you add too many notes to a chord, it could end up making the harmony sound cluttered. It's a good idea to learn as many inversions as you can. When you do, you can focus on creating melodies within the chords themselves, chords being multiple melodies played at once. You'll find that you get much better as a whole if you have a good understanding and vision of the fretboard.
#4
Also it's quite common to see people play barre chords with their thumb fretting the low E. I do this a lot, regardless of the fact that many say it is 'bad technique'. It frees up my fingers, and its quicker for me to change to an A-based barre, the way i play them.
#5
Quote by titopuente
This really depends on the genre that you're looking at. It's hard to get the tight, percussive effect that is normally used in funk or reggae with 6-string chords. If you're playing an acoustic 3-chord pop song, and you're just strumming, those chords are just fine.

I tend to use either 3 or 4 notes, but it really depends on context. If you add too many notes to a chord, it could end up making the harmony sound cluttered. It's a good idea to learn as many inversions as you can. When you do, you can focus on creating melodies within the chords themselves, chords being multiple melodies played at once. You'll find that you get much better as a whole if you have a good understanding and vision of the fretboard.
totally agree. It's all about less dense and more open voicings. When you have different rhythm players - bass, piano, another guitarist - people in certain genres like to play chords that leave room for other players. So he's right. However...this does not apply to 95% of rock music because the whole point is to usually get a dense sound.
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#6
He's half right - most players will still actually use the full barre fingering, they just won't hit all the notes
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#8
Quote by steven seagull
He's half right - most players will still actually use the full barre fingering, they just won't hit all the notes


+ 1

this is often the case.

also it seems like the 70s early 80s stuff used alot of barre chords. Sometimes as steven seagul said, they would only hit some of the strings. When you get to 80's metal.... Metallica and after..... alot of bands simplified that and just use power chords.

that being said barre chords are used ALOT.... so are alot of other types of chords.
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#9
Different shapes are also used to allow for better voice leading, which makes the chord changes sound smooth.
#10
Yes, especially in jazz this is important; if you play jazz guitar, you'll need to know about shell voicings, in which only the most important notes of the chord (such as 1 3 b7) for a dominant 7th chord are played. It allows you to keep the tonality of the chord while staying in the background while someone's soloing. I know a jazz player who plays solely minor 7th barre chords as his comping chords; if he did that to me while I was soloing he'd be wearing his ass for a hat.
#11
Quote by :-D
Yes, especially in jazz this is important; if you play jazz guitar, you'll need to know about shell voicings, in which only the most important notes of the chord (such as 1 3 b7) for a dominant 7th chord are played. It allows you to keep the tonality of the chord while staying in the background while someone's soloing. I know a jazz player who plays solely minor 7th barre chords as his comping chords; if he did that to me while I was soloing he'd be wearing his ass for a hat.


I use those voicings on bass. I try to keep my chords to two or three notes, or else they get very dense in lower registers.
#12
It's really all in the situation, genre and style. I'd say full barre chords certainly
have thier place and aren't going to be obsolete any time soon.

Still, it's a great skill to be able to play fragments of chords up & down the neck.
Very useful for jazz or anything where the rhythm and harmony is more complex.
#13
Quote by GuitarMunky
+ 1

this is often the case.

also it seems like the 70s early 80s stuff used alot of barre chords. Sometimes as steven seagul said, they would only hit some of the strings. When you get to 80's metal.... Metallica and after..... alot of bands simplified that and just use power chords.

that being said barre chords are used ALOT.... so are alot of other types of chords.


Yeah ofcourse barre chords are used alot, just look at Jack Johnson. He wasnt trying to say barre chords arent used but rather that profesional players use partial chord voicing more. You barely see anyone playing full barre chords in reggae or funk.
radiantmoon is the toughest person I know. He inflects a sense of impending doom upon any who look upon his stone-chiseled face. The children run out of fear, while the men run for they know that the stories are true.
#14
Quote by radiantmoon
Yeah ofcourse barre chords are used alot, just look at Jack Johnson. He wasnt trying to say barre chords arent used but rather that profesional players use partial chord voicing more. You barely see anyone playing full barre chords in reggae or funk.


actually in reggae they use them alot. and when they dont they often form the full chord, but just hit part.

using barre chords is not any sort of indicator of being professional or not. They're just chords. - very commonly used chords. and really if one is used more than another, does it really matter? the fact is that full barre chords... and partial chords are used..... very often.

- you did ask us to say what we think about it...... well, thats what I think.
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Last edited by GuitarMunky at Mar 30, 2008,
#15
Quote by GuitarMunky
actually in reggae they use them alot. and when they dont they often form the full chord, but just hit part.

using barre chords is not any sort of indicator of being professional or not. They're just chords. - very commonly used chords. and really if one is used more than another, does it really matter? the fact is that full barre chords... and partial chords are used..... very often.

- you did ask us to say what we think about it...... well, thats what I think.


Obviously bare chords are used. But when players advance I think they look for other voicings beside the standard barre chord shapes, or infact just play partial chords. I mean partial even if they are fingering the full barre but only hiting 2 or 3 strings. Do you think there was a reason for my teacher saying what he said? And in reggae they mostly play with only the top 3 or 4 strings(ofcourse there are exceptions, but mostly)
radiantmoon is the toughest person I know. He inflects a sense of impending doom upon any who look upon his stone-chiseled face. The children run out of fear, while the men run for they know that the stories are true.
Last edited by radiantmoon at Mar 30, 2008,
#16
I like to use the C and G barres, because they're very useful and minimise movements. I also play D chords higher up the neck, but I don't barre because I only hit the 1st, 2nd and 3rd strings and like to keep my pinky free to hit the good ol' sus4.

For me, the main advantage of these chords is the fact that you have more choice when you want to play a little lead fill based on these notes. If you use the same relative notes for every little part, it'll sound samey.
#17
Quote by radiantmoon
Obviously bare chords are used. But when players advance I think they look for other voicings beside the standard barre chord shapes, or infact just play partial chords. I mean partial even if they are fingering the full barre but only hiting 2 or 3 strings. Do you think there was a reason for my teacher saying what he said? And in reggae they mostly play with only the top 3 or 4 strings(ofcourse there are exceptions, but mostly)


ofcourse, when players advance, there are lots of things they will want to learn and use. There is no reason to downplay barre chords... or even power chords for that matter. They are what they are. I dont see there usage as any kind of skill indicator.

anyway, you asked us what we thought, I told you what I thought. I wasnt looking for an argument.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Mar 30, 2008,
#18
Quote by radiantmoon
my guitar teacher was telling me that most professional players dont tend to use the standard Eshaped and Ashaped barre chords when playing, but instead use alot of partial chords instead. Now he never said they never use them but the prefer playing partial chords or chords that are not the standard barre chord shape. Is there any truth to what he was saying or do you think barre chords are used just as much.

well when i see videos of people playing, i still see a lot of the standard barre chords used. but i guess he's right in the sense that more advanced players usually try to find other voicings or more interesting chords to play. but that doesnt make them "more" professional. if you are a pro, that just means you get paid to do what it is you do. so that right there doesnt really apply.

right now im using more of the C and G shapes instead of the standard E and A shapes. they have a slightly different sound so it makes things a little more interesting.
#19
Quote by GuitarMunky
ofcourse, when players advance, there are lots of things they will want to learn and use. There is no reason to downplay barre chords... or even power chords for that matter. They are what they are. I dont see there usage as any kind of skill indicator.

anyway, you asked us what we thought, I told you what I thought. I wasnt looking for an argument.


I never down played barre chords. My teacher told me that more advanced players use other chords more than they did barre chords, you obviously disagree with what he said. No arguments
radiantmoon is the toughest person I know. He inflects a sense of impending doom upon any who look upon his stone-chiseled face. The children run out of fear, while the men run for they know that the stories are true.
#20
Quote by radiantmoon
I never down played barre chords. My teacher told me that more advanced players use other chords more than they did barre chords, you obviously disagree with what he said. No arguments


I guess..... I think advanced players use all sorts of things... including barre chords. I've never like tried to get a statistic on it, as I dont see it as a measure of skill. It has more to do with style than skill level IMO.

classic rock = lots of barre chords
jazz = 4 note voicings... some barres... but certainly not as often
metal = standard power chords, drop tuning 1 finger power chords and octaves
country & bluegrass: open chords, capos, some barre chords..


* those are generalizations ofcourse..... there is more to those styles than that.


anyway, thats how I see it.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Mar 30, 2008,