#1
ok, i just noticed this arpeggio shape is used quite alot:
D w+h F w+w A
or

E--------------------13-17----
B-----------------15------------
G-------------14----------------
D---------15--------------------
A----17-------------------------
E--------------------------------


can someone tell me what type of arp it is(major , minor, dimished etc etc..)?

thanks

EDIT: dunno what happened with the code...but its fixed now

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Can make a Heav'n of Hell, a Hell of Heav'n"

- John Milton, Paradise Lost
Last edited by metallicafan616 at Mar 29, 2008,
#3
Quote by sixstringsteve
minor


If you look at an A#m chord:

13
14
15
15
13
X

You can see that your arpeggio is the top three strings of that chord, so it would be an A#m arpeggio.

Edit: but if you look at your w+h and w+w, and know some theory, you know that
1 b3 5 (or 1 +3semitones +4semitones), is a minor chord
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Last edited by sacamano79 at Mar 29, 2008,
#4
2nd inversion minor arpeggio if it is only those three notes.

However many times it looks like this in this case it is a major 7th arp

E-----------------------------------------------13---17
B----------------------------------------15--------------
G----------------------------------14--------------------
D----------------------------15--------------------------
A--------------13-----17--------------------------------
Originally posted by arrrgg
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#5

e-13----------
b----15-------
g-------14----
D----------12-
A-------------
E-------------


looks a lot like a Dmin chord in the second octave doesnt it?


e-1-
b-3-
g-2-
D-0-
A-x-
E-x-
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#6
Quote by Led man32
2nd inversion minor arpeggio if it is only those three notes.

However many times it looks like this in this case it is a major 7th arp

E-----------------------------------------------13---17
B----------------------------------------15--------------
G----------------------------------14--------------------
D----------------------------15--------------------------
A--------------13-----17--------------------------------


In the context he stated there is no Bb in the chord, so it would still be a min triad arpeggio in second inversion, rather than a major seventh arpeggio.

But you are correct that it is PART of a maj7th arpeggio.
#7
ooh...didn't know u could get inverted arpeggios, total theory noob still....cant afford a teacher =(

thanks for the replies and just realised the code screwed up..about to fix that heh..

"The mind is its own place, and in itself

Can make a Heav'n of Hell, a Hell of Heav'n"

- John Milton, Paradise Lost
#8
Quote by metallicafan616
ooh...didn't know u could get inverted arpeggios, total theory noob still....cant afford a teacher =(

thanks for the replies and just realised the code screwed up..about to fix that heh..


the one you have up now is Emin arpeggio

EDIT: Eminor, made a dumb typo
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Last edited by `NeXxuS` at Mar 29, 2008,
#9
wouldnt emaj be (1st 3rd and 5th) E, Ab, B?

-----------------------7--12----
-------------------9-------------
---------------9-----------------
-----------9---------------------
--7--11-------------------------
----------------------------------

"The mind is its own place, and in itself

Can make a Heav'n of Hell, a Hell of Heav'n"

- John Milton, Paradise Lost
#10
Quote by metallicafan616
ooh...didn't know u could get inverted arpeggios, total theory noob still....cant afford a teacher =(

thanks for the replies and just realised the code screwed up..about to fix that heh..


You'll find that a very large amount of sweeped arpeggios are inversions because it makes it possible for them to smoothly lead into one another.

Edit - Here, I'll give an example. Say that you had a chord progression of C-Em. The notes in those two chords are C E G and E G B, respectively. If you look, they have two of the same three notes, and the two notes that are different are only one semi-tone apart. So you could do this for the C major arpeggio (we'll stick with three-strings for simplicity):


-------15-20-15----
----17----------17-
-17----------------
-------------------
-------------------
-------------------


Now, for the Em arp, we could jump up the neck and play this


-------17-24-17----
----18----------18-
-19----------------
-------------------
-------------------
-------------------


or we could simply alter one note of the C arpeggio and come up with this inversion of Em


-------15-19-15----
----17----------17-
-16----------------
-------------------
-------------------
-------------------


Which minimizes movement and makes a silky smooth transition from one arpeggio into the next.
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Last edited by DaddyTwoFoot at Mar 29, 2008,
#12
Quote by metallicafan616
wouldnt emaj be (1st 3rd and 5th) E, Ab, B?

-----------------------7--12----
-------------------9-------------
---------------9-----------------
-----------9---------------------
--7--11-------------------------
----------------------------------


Major = 1, 3, 5. In E this is E, G#, B.

E, Ab, B is 1, b4, 5
#13
Quote by isaac_bandits
Major = 1, 3, 5. In E this is E, G#, B.

E, Ab, B is 1, b4, 5


that Ab is G#
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#14
Quote by `NeXxuS`
that Ab is G#


No he's right. Ab =/= G#. A is the 4 of E major, and the interval between the 3 and 4 is a half step. So b4 is enharmonic to 3 in this case. It was written wrong.
#15
thanks DaddyTwoFoot, that helped alot!

"The mind is its own place, and in itself

Can make a Heav'n of Hell, a Hell of Heav'n"

- John Milton, Paradise Lost