#1
Allright, this is the story. theres a rocknroll clothing store near myhouse on a crowded high street, thats offered us a gig in the window. thers just one problem. IM REALLY NERVOUS AND HAVENT A CLUE WHAT TO DO!!! The shop say we should play our normal stuff, but i dont know how to set everything up, what to look out for, easy mistakes to make, what to make sure of and everything. along with that, our singer needs stage presence, and needs his confidence building up.
Next problem = second gig.
were playing at the drummer and singers joint birthday party, and there will be a lot of stuck up english kids, who have never heard of pink floyd, or thewho, or the stones.

we need some good stuff, that a band with a single guitar, a bassist, a drummer and a singer could do. along with that, does anyone know what makes a band really good live, an easy way to do lights, and any other ideas. please help!
#2
stuck up english kids, eh?

play sex pistols covers... or any anarchist type stuff
#3
There are English kids who have never heard of Floyd, The Who, OR The Stones? Jeez, I don't think there are any American kids who havent heard of those bands.

What makes a band good is how tight they are. You guys could have the technical ability of a rat, but as long as what your playing sounds tight, as long as you and all the other guys are synched up to each other, it'll sound good.

In this scenario:

A) This band has an amazing guitarist, he can shred faster than Steve Vai and can play a solo more beautifully than David Gilmour, but their drummer and bass player just can't keep it together and it sounds like a jumbled mess.

B) Nobody in this band is technically THAT impressive, but the drummer can keep a steady beat and the other guys can follow along pretty smoothly with simple chords or whatever they are playing.

Which do you think an audience would rather hear? Obviously they would rather hear option B. Unless you're playing to a crowd of 14 year old kids who do nothing but play guitar for 10 hours a day, almost always an audience will want to hear a band who is tight and pleasing to the ear, as opposed to a band who has a member or two who are technically impressive, but can't keep a cohesive sound together as a band.
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Last edited by trey-col89 at Mar 29, 2008,
#4
If noone knows the who or pink floyd or anything at the second gig, you will surely rock their worlds.
#5
the clash - should i stay or should i go

stage presence - make sure the singer talks in between songs, introducing them and whatnot, jumping in appropriate places, clapping hands in appropriate places etc.
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#6
DON'T stand still.....both the singer and everybody else in the band! It'll bore the crap out of the audience and they will all stop moving as well. Just watch some videos of bands that you like live on stage.... do what they do.
#7
first, you need to decide what you are going to play and then practice it. make sure you have the right equipment, especially with regard to volume (there is no point in the guitarist having a 350 watt half stack when the bassist has a 25 watt combo).

do a soundcheck of the venue and make sure everything is clear and there is no feedback.

basically, use your common sense: take spare strings, picks, cables, and the guitarists should have at least 2 guitars on stage just in case.

my advice is to cover all the possible areas where something could go wrong, and enjoy the experience. and if you royally mess up, then at your next gig you will know to check whatever messed up the last time.

as for stage presence and confidence, i think you only acquire a "stage presence" by being on stage a lot. i would advise the singer and guitarist to move around when they can, interact with the audience but not at the expense of the music. do the interacting and showy stuff during the easy parts of your songs, and when it comes time for that amazing guitar or vocal solo, concentrate on that.

every band had a first gig -- do you think Led Zeppelin or Pink Floyd were total masters of the performance at their first gigs? just enjoy the music, and by playing more gigs you will gain more experience and then you will know what you are like on stage etc.
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#8
Quote by chillrock
every band had a first gig -- do you think Led Zeppelin or Pink Floyd were total masters of the performance at their first gigs? just enjoy the music, and by playing more gigs you will gain more experience and then you will know what you are like on stage etc.

Yeah, Zeppelin's first gig actually went down quite badly. Afterwards, someone actually said to Page, "Man, keep playing like that and you guys are going down like a Lead Zeppelin." They got rid of the day so everyone wouldn't think they were Lead Zeppelin with lead being used like in "lead guitar".

So who knows, if you do great, awesome! If you don't, make the best out of it, you just might be the next Zep.
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#9
totally do a sound check at the first gig. just choose a realy quick realy easy song so you can get ur levels right, like fell in love with a girl- the white stripes
or something easy like that, maybe something more suited to your genre, but something short
#10
Quote by spiderfizz
totally do a sound check at the first gig. just choose a realy quick realy easy song so you can get ur levels right, like fell in love with a girl- the white stripes
or something easy like that, maybe something more suited to your genre, but something short


yeah, "Paranoid" by Black Sabbath is pretty easy, and short, as well.
Does anyone remember laughter?

Manuel, please try to understand before one of us DIES.

my gear:

Gibson LP Standard
Epiphone SG
Classical guitar
Peavey ValveKing 112
Marshall MG15
BOSS ME-50
#11
thanks for all the useful advice guys, this is helping loads. im trying to thon k of an anthemic classic rock song that EVERYBODY knows.
some of them will have heard the who and the zep and all that, but i dunno if they really know it.

If youre not too embarassed, can you tell me whats gone wrong at some of your gigs, so i can avoid the mistakes.

thanks again
#13
Quote by adr11iano
stuck up english kids, eh?

play sex pistols covers... or any anarchist type stuff

In my experience, the stuck up ones are usualy the ones that are the wildest because they can afford the most cocain.
Just one question thread starter, this window that you're playing in, if it breaks, do you have to pay for it?
#14
Just one question thread starter, this window that you're playing in, if it breaks, do you have to pay for it?



yes, i do unfortunately.
#15
Quote by johnsjollygiant
yes, i do unfortunately.

Hmmm, I've seen large windows go through with too much volume from a PA system. It may be an idea to tape duvets to it, just along the bottom.
What happens is, the vindow vibrates with the sound, and if it's a big window, it vibrates more, and if it vibrates too much, it breaks, so if you apply a bit of padding, this kinda soaks up the vibrations and makes the window safer.

How are you setting up the speakers? Not pointing at the window I hope?
Last edited by SlackerBabbath at Apr 2, 2008,
#16
i think i should tell you that the loudest equipment we have is 100 watts, and i very rarely turn that amp up past four. what sort of volume are you thinking we're playing at?

the speakers are going to point at the windows, but because we haveno feedback or stage monitor system we have the amps facing slightly inwards and in front of us.


what could we take that is lightly smaller than a mattress to absorb the shock
#17
Quote by johnsjollygiant
i think i should tell you that the loudest equipment we have is 100 watts, and i very rarely turn that amp up past four. what sort of volume are you thinking we're playing at?

the speakers are going to point at the windows, but because we haveno feedback or stage monitor system we have the amps facing slightly inwards and in front of us.


what could we take that is lightly smaller than a mattress to absorb the shock

Thick rolled up blankets taped along the edge of the window should do the trick.
It's the same idea as tapeing bits of padding to drum skins to stop them reverberating when they are played.
Just check what the window does when you're soundchecking. Cirtain tones, it probably won't move, but other tones, especialy bass tones, you might see a definate 'wobble' on the window that causes it to flex inwards and outwards, like a speaker cone does, you DON'T want this to happen. Start off quietly and gradualy increase the volume until you reach a level that works for you but doesn't cause the window to wobble. Also, a neat trick I've seen done is to hang a nail on a string from the top of the window frame so that it's resting against the window pane. If the nail dances and jiggles about, the window is vibrating. If it just moves slightly, you can get away with it, but if it moves violently, you have a problem. If you keep the string and nail there, during the gig, you can monitor the effect you're having on the window, and adjust your levels accordingly.
If it's a double glazed window, you shouldn't have much of a problem.
Another thought occurs, if people are watching you from the other side of the window, they might not hear very much. Glass, being a very smooth surface, bounces sound right back off it, so it may be an idea to place a speaker or two on the other side of the glass.
Last edited by SlackerBabbath at Apr 3, 2008,
#18
i would have hoped the sound got through the glass, but thats a good idea actually.

however i think you are over estimating the complexity of our speaker system.

we have an fm212r, and a jamman 150 speaker. and some mic stands. no mixer, monitors or speakers.

we like everything to be simple.
#19
Quote by slapfunk_101
DON'T stand still.....both the singer and everybody else in the band! It'll bore the crap out of the audience and they will all stop moving as well. Just watch some videos of bands that you like live on stage.... do what they do.

Yeah definately don't be afraid to move, my first gig I stood still at times cuz I thought I might be making an idiot of my self running around, but I watched a vid of it and it's a hell of a lot better looking then just standing there. And even if you do look like an idiot who cares, you're the one on stage playing, they're not:p
#20
Make sure you practice all the songs in the order you are gonna play them. Stand up as if your playing the gig with everyone in place. Seeing a band who can't play without being in a circle looking at each other sucks.

Get used to how big your 'stage' will be. Practice in the same size area (or tape the area on the ground). As people have said, move around, even if you hit a few bum notes just move around and recover. People will have more respect because you will be more entertaining.

Have fun, and other people will have fun too. At the end of the day you are better then anyone else listening purely because your trying to have fun, entertain and achieve something. Being nervous is normal and only makes you prepare better. Good luck.