#1
Hello! I am looking for some live guitar tabbing software for some research, I'm sure I found one weeks ago, but like a moron I didn't save the link. By live tabbing I mean you plug your guitar into the line-in, then the software automatically tabs what you are playing. I am researching this as I plan to make my own version for my dissitation, so any advice/links on this topic would be greatly appreciated.
#2
I would imagine you'd have to use some form of midi guitar otherwise it would be far to complex to be feasible. i don't think such a program does exist though.
#5
You have a fundamental problem for your dissertation. It IS possible for a regular guitar to be converted to midi and then transcribed into notation automatically. HOWEVER, there is no way that an algorithm yet created can prescribe what fret-position a given note should be played.
Gear:
Inflatable Guitar
Digitech GSP 2101/Mosvalve 962/Yamaha S412V
My Imagination
#6
Yeah, i'm trying to implement this with normal guitars, not midi. Its hard but I don't think impossible, we have already covered how do work out which frequencies are being played at any point, so using this, I can get the notes being played. Then maybe start with a prompt as to where on the fretboard you start, and AI can decided intuitively, or based on amplitude, where you would be playing next on the fretboard etc. This is based on the fact that from the starting note, you will *generally* be playing in the same vicinity, but the program could be fairly dynamic, so at the end you see its tabbed you further down when you actually switched to soloing then you could drag the first wrong fret to its correct position, then it would re-run the algorithm to produce the correct version. With this I see for a general song with good AI only say 10 changes max will be required, which is nothing time wise compared to tabbing the whole thing manually (as one change could take 2 seconds).
I am sure I found one piece of software somewhere that kinda did that, but have spent ages trolling the web to find it again, and can't! Balls.
Last edited by Weebl_Soldier at Mar 29, 2008,
#7
So this program would be for leads? I don't understand how frequency readings would be able to translate all chord tones not to mention put them in an order on the fretboard that makes it possible to play. What happens with articulations? I'm asking cuz I'm interested.
Gear:
Inflatable Guitar
Digitech GSP 2101/Mosvalve 962/Yamaha S412V
My Imagination
#8
Im not sure how it will perform, ideally in theory, it may be able to pick out chords, by analysing frequencies being played in the same time domain, but this will lead to a lot of tweaking, as the system will have to be able to differentiate between chords and really fast shredding. My personal aims is to get it to do light soloing and chords, ignoring shredding (my guitar skills aren't up to that anyways, and not my style), but in theory the system should handle it I guess. Over this next week or so I am going to start implementing a basic solution to test the water and see how doable it is. Will post my results here.
#9
Quote by KryptNet
So this program would be for leads? I don't understand how frequency readings would be able to translate all chord tones not to mention put them in an order on the fretboard that makes it possible to play. What happens with articulations? I'm asking cuz I'm interested.


Actually, importing MIDI into Guitar Pro works quite well. You just have to proofread it to fix the few little errors. Otherwise it comes out fine. Don't ask me how.
#11
Quote by KryptNet
You have a fundamental problem for your dissertation. It IS possible for a regular guitar to be converted to midi and then transcribed into notation automatically. HOWEVER, there is no way that an algorithm yet created can prescribe what fret-position a given note should be played.


I'm guessing this could be partially solved where you check for bass frequencies in the played note. If there is x amount of bass frequencies under i.e. 200hz then you are playing the note on the D string, if there is y amount of freq under 300hz then the G string etc. Of course you'd have to take the pickups into account (bridge, neck) and so on.

I seriously doubt a program like this actually exists. Because if it did, we'd have an intelligent software harmonizer out and not some guitar tabbing software.
#12
Quote by KryptNet
So this program would be for leads? I don't understand how frequency readings would be able to translate all chord tones not to mention put them in an order on the fretboard that makes it possible to play. What happens with articulations? I'm asking cuz I'm interested.


I think it would need a pickup for each note. Then it would know what notes are being played on which strings, which it could do just like how a tuner works. Then, it would assume standard tuning and choose the fret. You could also specify the tuning if necessary.
#13
could you not use a logic equation to try and give it like a "easiest way to play it" that way it kinda puts it in a box around the right frets? how you would program that is beyond me
#14
Actually, using Gibson's new(er) robot guitar, you could probably do this. It uses a special cable and weird on-board software that separates the signal from each string, and sends them as separate signals. If you got some software for that, you could definitely pull it off.

Harmonics would probably cause a problem, though, unless it had a way to recognize the difference in waveforms between harmonics and normally-played notes. Also, it probably wouldn't be able to tell the different between using a slide or bending a note.
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#15
Quote by jtmj121
could you not use a logic equation to try and give it like a "easiest way to play it" that way it kinda puts it in a box around the right frets? how you would program that is beyond me


"Logic" would be somewhat challenging to program into this. It would be better to isolate each string.
#16
I also think there has to be some kind of list algorithm. Something that can take every standard chord form and figure out what would be most appropriate. With processing power being what it is, it shouldn't be much of a problem if the non-midi raw frequencies can truly be measured that accurately. It was my understanding that overtones, w/ string instruments in particular created a big problem. Anyway...this is an interesting project.
Gear:
Inflatable Guitar
Digitech GSP 2101/Mosvalve 962/Yamaha S412V
My Imagination
#18
Okay, the software above as far as I can tell is just for midi guitars. But I have found some freeware wav to midi converters, such as http://www.pluto.dti.ne.jp/~araki/amazingmidi/, and I have tested loading a sample wav of me playing into that, then converting that midi to guitar pro using guitar Pro software, and it kinda works. It can do simple stuff, but struggles even with slow finger picking. But this gives me hope that there are methods for doing this.