#1
I'm new to playing guitar, I recently bought a Yamaha F310 acoustic. I keep it in it's case when i'm not playing it, and I keep a close eye on the humidity levels with a hygrometer (I have an oasis humidifier in the sound hole) during winter. So basically I want to make sure it's in good condition and stays that way. I'm probably being a little overkill for a low cost guitar, but I can't see how it can hurt.

Right now i'm using a damp microfibre cloth to clean the outside of my guitar, but I was wondering if there are any polishes/waxes I should consider using, and if so, which ones would work best?

I know there are a few threads discussing waxes/polishes, but I was wondering if anyone can suggest anything specific for this type of acoustic. Is there anyone out there with a F310 that uses a polish/wax, if so can you recommend one that works well, or should I just continue using a damp cloth and stay away from the stuff?
#2
You can wax it as long as the guitar has a high gloss finish. Satin's and flat natural finishes should be handled differently. I use Gerlitz products. They've been around a long time. I remember them way back when I was a teenager, and I'm 45 now. Their wax is excellent, as is the Guitar Honey for fretboards. Here's the link:

http://www.gerlitzguitarproducts.com/index.html

The big thing about wax is that you never want to overdo it, and you don't want to be putting it on very often. 2, maybe 3 times a year is all it should ever need to keep it looking great. In between, just wipe it down with a damp, soft cloth like you're currently doing.
#3
do not use anything that contains silicone period. all i use is my microfiber but my finish is varnish so as said above it is different. just read the label and make sure theres no silicone in it it will hinder your ability to do any finish work on the guitar at a later date.
#6
Quote by anita prs bad
do not use anything that contains silicone period. all i use is my microfiber but my finish is varnish so as said above it is different. just read the label and make sure theres no silicone in it it will hinder your ability to do any finish work on the guitar at a later date.


Very true about silicone, and good advice for cars too. You won't be able to repaint anywhere that's been treated with a silicone based anything on a car. It'll bead up the paint just like it does water. Steer clear of it.
#7
Quote by Guitar Hack
Most people just use lemon oil


Yep, pure lemon oil is the best stuff. It replaces some of the natural wood oils. Especially on the fretboard.


FrankinJax

================================

Luthier's Workshop
Acoustic Guitar making discussed here.


http://groups.ultimate-guitar.com/luthiers/
Last edited by FrankinJax at Apr 29, 2008,
#8
Keep in mind that polishes contain abrasives that will wear at the finish. Unless you're trying to remove a flaw, just use hot breath and old cotton.
#9
Dr. Duck's Ax Wax is also a good choice. You can pretty much use it on the entire instrument, including strings.

Regarding lemon oil, my cousin (who owns six guitars and considers Taylor 612CE to be the low-end model on his collection) says that it can actually accelerate corrosion along the frets, and he recommends rosewood oil in its place. I'm inclined to take his word for it (as he's been playing and taking care of guitars almost as long as I've been alive), but any opinion on that?
#10
Quote by TokyoNeko
Dr. Duck's Ax Wax is also a good choice. You can pretty much use it on the entire instrument, including strings.

Regarding lemon oil, my cousin (who owns six guitars and considers Taylor 612CE to be the low-end model on his collection) says that it can actually accelerate corrosion along the frets, and he recommends rosewood oil in its place. I'm inclined to take his word for it (as he's been playing and taking care of guitars almost as long as I've been alive), but any opinion on that?


sounds plausible. all you really need to keep the neck in good order is some sort of mineral oil, which is what lemon oil and what rosewood oil essentially are.
#13
Quote by TokyoNeko

Regarding lemon oil, my cousin (who owns six guitars and considers Taylor 612CE to be the low-end model on his collection) says that it can actually accelerate corrosion along the frets, and he recommends rosewood oil in its place. I'm inclined to take his word for it (as he's been playing and taking care of guitars almost as long as I've been alive), but any opinion on that?


I've heard this too, but I've never heard of anybody having a problem with frets corroding either. But a lot of lemon oils on the market are just scented mineral oils anyway -- maybe that has something to do with it?
#14
All you need is the polish below and an old sock. You can find it at any guitar center. It cleans everything and smells great to boot.

Last edited by GC Shred Off at Jun 5, 2009,