#1
Ok, I've been a guitar player for quite sometime now but I feel like I have done very little progress because I have never practiced enough. My main problem is I very rarely feel very connected to music but when I do it feels like I am in paradise! It feels like it's the thing that I've always wanted to do. So i go and practice on the guitar but then I feel a great block by my lack of creativity. What does this mean? Am I not cut out for music? Will it always be like music doesn't get to me most of the time?
What I wanna know is if there is anyway I can connect more with music, make it more the centre of my life.
Whenever I don't feel like hearing music it annoys me and I prefer silence, something that gets me down afterwards.
Is it just me or is there some way to surpass this?
#2
Try some new instruments. Listen to some new artists.
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#3
Quote by Muphin
Try some new instruments. Listen to some new artists.

Love guitar, never would drop it.
Any inspirations?
#4
Quote by Virtuoso883
Love guitar, never would drop it.
Any inspirations?


Dont drop it. I play a lot of instruments and they all overlap and influence different aspects of my playing and appreciation.
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#5
Quote by Virtuoso883
Love guitar, never would drop it.
Any inspirations?

Music works like language - the more you know of it the more you'll be able to get out of using it.
#6
I am not ashamed of the fact that there are moments in time where I want nothing but silence. I don't think you should be either. Extended silence only accentuates the musical moments in our lives and is a remedy to the over exposure that us serious musicians are prone to.

There is a video where Bill Evans talks about music criticism and the reasons why he prefers the layman's judgment over the professionals; that is the layman still possesses a musical naivety due to an absence of the rudiments of music in their daily lives which the professional, being exposed to music constantly must work to preserve.

And that arrives me to my foremost point. The moments in time where you feel closest to music is likely due to an accidental acquaintance with your musical naivety, and by not being aware of it you let it slip rather then preserve it. The ultimate problem that immature musicians face in practicing is that they don't fully appreciate it as the means for which it is. It is impossible for one to play the instrument at all times inspired, and so the purpose of practice is to attain such a manner of proficiency that when inspiration comes that the inspired may be free to fully express whatever.

Artistry in it's most complete and masterful form requires an immense amount of proficiency in the desired expressive outlet, and so by that being necessary, we musicians are locked within a conundrum which can only be surmounted by the aforementioned means. Unfortunately that means that for a lot of the time you spend in music, most of it will be "uninspired" (but NOT unmusical! always practice with the music in mind!). First comes rigidity then proficiency, and finally expressiveness. And with everyday you must actively seek those special moments, but do not be discouraged when you do not find them everyday, because then they would no longer be special (and because even masters like Bill Evans only experiences them periodically).
#7
^^Wow. That was really helpful to my mindset. Thx for that Erc.

Hope it helps the TS as well.
Gear:
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Digitech GSP 2101/Mosvalve 962/Yamaha S412V
My Imagination
#8
The only major problem I can see in your post is the fact that there are times when music annoys you. If you really want to be a musician, and not just a dabbler, you really need to immerse yourself in music. Besides the times that I'm in class, there is rarely a minute during the day that I'm not listening to music. This is not to say that it doesn't happen; I just prefer to be listening to something musical.

You mentioned that you're not creative, but as far as music goes, perceived creativity problems are usually ear problems disguised. Start singing melodies when you won't be a nuisance, and if you don't want to sing them, hum or whistle them. It doesn't have to be your original music, it can be one of your favorite songs. If you keep doing this over the course of months and years, your ear will gradually improve, and hearing and creating music will become much easier.

My favorite part of playing the guitar is improvisation. If I don't have anything to do, I'll use to Guitar Pro to loop chord progressions for a long time, and keep jamming over it until I run out of ideas and start playing new ideas. You'll know when you've made the connection with the music if you get interrupted and you feel a sense of almost disorientation. That's another important thing: Creating and playing music requires intense focus. I would recommend meditation to achieve that focus and quiet your mind.

Good luck!
#9
Quote by titopuente


Start singing melodies when you won't be a nuisance, and if you don't want to sing them, hum or whistle them. It doesn't have to be your original music, it can be one of your favorite songs. If you keep doing this over the course of months and years, your ear will gradually improve, and hearing and creating music will become much easier.


So if I played separate notes, scales, chords and harmonies while reciting them with my voice (or singing it, or imagining the sounds in my head), would this improve my improvisation over time?

I've thought about this recently and can't see why it wouldn't be possible - one is able to (if his/her vocal register allows) replicate notes in an instant with the voice...
#10
Quote by -Vogel-
So if I played separate notes, scales, chords and harmonies while reciting them with my voice (or singing it, or imagining the sounds in my head), would this improve my improvisation over time?

I've thought about this recently and can't see why it wouldn't be possible - one is able to (if his/her vocal register allows) replicate notes in an instant with the voice...

You would still need to become accustomed to improvising just like any other musician, but speaking from my own experience, you become much more comfortable in improv when you can hear your way through. It used to be extremely frustrating for me to be playing a song with other people, hearing something that could be played, trying to play it, and not coming anywhere close to what I intended. Not that my ears are perfect now, since this is a lifelong process, but it becomes easier, and this is part of the reason why music students in college have to take sight singing classes, even if only a fraction of classical students will ever be in a situation that requires improvisation. Bottom line: train your ears, n00b!