#1
do you still listen to casettes? I do, my mom had a whole bunch since she was a kid and good thing that she listen to the good music. I have ccr, ac/dc, ozzy, pink floyd, def leppard and a couple others. what do you listen to?
#2
Lol, come on man... tapes? They sound like **** even next to CD's. Vinyl is the only medium that isn't compressed in some way and can play all the musical frequencies recorded.
“Act the way you'd like to be and soon you'll be the way you act.” - Leonard Cohen


"Our greatest glory is not in never falling, but in rising every time we fall" - Confucius
#3
Hi and welcome to ug, youre lucky your mom knew her music. I have some cassettes,99% my dads. Unfortunately the ones i liked most got lost years ago when we moved to our current house so i usually listen to cds or mp3s
#4
Quote by FendermanOC
Lol, come on man... tapes? They sound like **** even next to CD's. Vinyl is the only medium that isn't compressed in some way and can play all the musical frequencies recorded.


all audible frequencies fit on cds and vinyl is more likely to wear out since its read mechanically
#5
no, Im 19. The only tapes I can remember are You can call me Al and a few Sesame Street ones.
Gear
Gibson Les Paul std faded, Godin LG
Marshall jcm900
Keeley ds1, maxon od808, boston tu500, RMC Wizard
#6
Natural sound is by definition analog. When a CD recording is created, this analog is sound is digitized. To do this, they take a lot of snapshots of the analog sound. For a CD recording they take 44,100 snapshots in a minute. These snapshots are then converted to digital information with a certain precision. Because the number of snapshots that are taken are not infinite (the maximum is 44,100 per minute), the process of taking snapshots results in the loss of information. Information is further
lost because each of these snapshots must be made to fit in one of the 65,536 "drawers of the chest" if you will. By definition a digital recording doesn't include all the sound information.A record player which plays LP’s is strictly analog. A vinyl record has a groove carved into it that mirrors the original sound's waveform. The record player than transforms this groove to an analogue sound signal which can be fed into an amplifier. In this process, no information can be lost. No snapshots need to be taken and the sound doesn't need be converted to one of the possible 65,536 values.
“Act the way you'd like to be and soon you'll be the way you act.” - Leonard Cohen


"Our greatest glory is not in never falling, but in rising every time we fall" - Confucius
Last edited by FendermanOC at Mar 30, 2008,
#7
Cassette tape has the potential to be pretty good, as witnessed by the Nakamichi Dragon and various other high quality tape playback decks in the last 20 odd years. However the majority of consumer tapes manufactured are of very lackluster quality and the playback devices even worse.

Another little tidbit, cassette tape, just like analog reel-to-reel tape can be "overloaded" or saturated (tape saturation). It's a form of dynamic compression (not mp3 or anything like that ) where the sound gets squeezed together. Tons of CDs apply copious amounts of digital dynamic compression to squeeze the sound together but many say tape saturation is warmer and a lot more pleasing to the ear.
#8
What difference does the sound quality make when you guys are using crappy headphones or speakers to listen to the music. An ipod with lossless files, and a pair of UE earphones, will sound far better than the rigs most people have for cd playback, and even more for vynil playback. Cassete sound quality deteriorates over time, cd quality stays the same. And CD can reproduce most frequencies and its quality will be stable over time until the data is gone.

AS for cassestes, I hate cassetes, but if the music is good what the hell.,
#9
Well, seeing as you cant just throw in some computer speakers into a record player and expect it to play, most people using vinyl have a fairly decent setup.
“Act the way you'd like to be and soon you'll be the way you act.” - Leonard Cohen


"Our greatest glory is not in never falling, but in rising every time we fall" - Confucius