#1
So, having no past experience with playing the quitar, I picked up a starter pack at my local GC yesterday. I've been reading the lessons and trying to practice the basic chords.

The problem is: For example, with the A chord, I'm supposed to press down the BGD strings on the second fret, but I can't seem to fit 3 fingers into the space between the medal bars dividing the frets. I always end up with this buzzing noise. I get a nice sound when I press down right at the medal of the fret, but if I move it a little closer towards the medal bars, the buzzing noise returns.

So my question is: How do I position my finger so I don't get the buzzing noise? Is something defective about my guitar (since it makes buzzing noise if my fingers too close to the medal bars) or is it just me?

Thanks!
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#2
practice practice practice is the only real answer

ull figure out these things in time for your own conditions


srry to hear about the starter pack tho
#4
try pressing harder on the dgb strings. you can also take the easy way and bar the 4 high strings on the 2nd fret i belive that is an A6 but i could be mistaken
#5
Quote by AverageGai
So, having no past experience with playing the quitar, I picked up a starter pack at my local GC yesterday. I've been reading the lessons and trying to practice the basic chords.

The problem is: For example, with the A chord, I'm supposed to press down the BGD strings on the second fret, but I can't seem to fit 3 fingers into the space between the medal bars dividing the frets. I always end up with this buzzing noise. I get a nice sound when I press down right at the medal of the fret, but if I move it a little closer towards the medal bars, the buzzing noise returns.

So my question is: How do I position my finger so I don't get the buzzing noise? Is something defective about my guitar (since it makes buzzing noise if my fingers too close to the medal bars) or is it just me?

Thanks!

Like the guy above me said, it's all about the practice. Also, you didn't mention whether you bought an electric guitar or an acoustic guitar. An acoustic is harder to learn on (but pays off in the long run) because the "action" is higher. What this means is that the strings are done in such a way that they are more highly elevated from the fretboard, therefore you have to put a bit more pressure on them in order to touch the fretboard and it'll hurt your fingers a lot worse for a beginner (not to mention barre chords are significantly more difficult to do, but that's a whole different story). There is a possibility that your guitar is defective, but I highly doubt it. However, the buzzing could come from a problem in the guitar's "action." Most likely, it is your lack of experience and it'll fix over time, but just in case, take it to a music store and ask them if the action needs adjusting due to "fret buzz."
#6
very normal....honestly keep doing what your doing and all the sudden it'll just click and you'll get it...it won't take too long. just keep working at it and u'll get it. everyone i know who plays guitar ran though this same thing when the first started.

more and mroe you play you'll build up calluses too and it'll make playing MUCH easier. stick it out and u'll get it
#7
I hated the A major chord when I first started, more so than the F major, or any barre chord for that matter.

With that said, it just takes time. Try placing one finger at a time in it's position, and make sure you can get the string to sound without the buzz. Add another finger, and make sure you can get both strings to sound. Then add the last finger, and find the right position so that you can get all the strings to ring out. It will feel uncomfortable and awkward at first, but keep practicing that position and eventually (after a few weeks or so) you'll be able to effortlessly play that chord.
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#8
Oh yeah, sorry about that. I'm using an acoustic (didn't knew it would make a difference). Yeah, my finger tips are hurting lol. One of the sale's person tested the guitar out before I bought it so I'm guessing it's not the guitar.
It is only with the heart that one can see rightly; what is essential is invisible to the eye.
#9
I started playing only 5 days ago, and I can hit the A chord pretty well now on a pretty cheap acoustic. Your fingers toughen up very quickly as long as you put the time in. To start with, the strings literally disappear into the fleshy parts of your finger tips, so making a good contact is nigh on impossible. I've been playing for about 10 mins in the morning before work, and then again for 20/30 mins in the evening and dabbing surgical spirit on my finger tips twice a day to speed up the process. Today I must have played 3 hours and its so much easier. My fingers are raw though lol.

The one I'm struggling with now is the C chord. Trying to get your fingers that far apart and still apply the necessary pressure to ring all the notes, and also stay out of the way of all the open strings is proving most tricky! It is amazing just how quickly you can progess though, if you put the practice in. I'm hooked!
#10
kevin dont worry you'll nail that C chord in no time. i was the same way when i first started. i thought it wasnt possible for me to play guitar. my fingers are really short, plus im a girl, so there even shorted and i could barely do a g chord, but with practice it comes. trust me lol
#11
I bought a pretty cheap guitar (£40), because I wasn't sure I'd get into it or not. I'd quite like to get someone who can play to have a go on my guitar, and pull off all those tricky barr chords, just so I know it can be done on this lump of wood - then I'll just need to put the hours in. Trying to fret the strings on the first fret is so hard (hence part of the reason I struggle with C) and the thought of trying to barr the whole lot leaves me sweating lol
#13
Everything seems to have been covered. The more you practice, the better.
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#14
Definitely about practice.

Was hard for me too, but I started VERY young so my fingers were smaller, but its still easy to do now.
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#15
I just went into a music shop in town and tried out some more expensive guitars. I suppose I was hoping that I would find it just as hard to hit those hard chords on the expensive guitar as I do on my £40 one at home. So I pick up a £200 hard wood topped Cort and get my fingers on the dreaded C chord that I just can't finger on my guitar, and it rings true first time. I then tried another Cort which isn't hard topped at £129 and again I can hit the chords perfectly.

So it looks like I'm gonna have to find the money to upgrage already. I'm just not going to enjoy struggling at home now on that guitar when I know it can be so much easier.

So the question is - is it worth spending the extra on the hard topped model and what are Cort guitars like?
#16
LOL

SAME EXACT PROBLEM I HAD WHEN STARTING

I found you can barre the 3 strings like mentioned above (but sometimes the high e will be muffled)

I actually like the sound of the high e in the chord, so what I do is a sorta triangle with my fingers.

Instead of stacking them like stairs one after the other in the fret, I fret the B string with my 3rd finger. I fret the G string with my 1st finger and I fret the D string with my 2nd finger.

Try it right now just with your fingers in the air. Lift your middle finger out the way and put your index and ring finger together. Then drop your middle finger on top of them. It kinda forms a triangle and takes up less space. Fits right in the fret!!
#17
I got the impulse-purchase adrenaline rush and went out and bought the Cort Earth 100. I couldn't hang around for ever waiting for you guys to respond!
#18
Check out the following video, I think it will help you.........http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yf_9ygMjaJ8
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#20
Quote by AC-DC luva
try pressing harder on the dgb strings. you can also take the easy way and bar the 4 high strings on the 2nd fret i belive that is an A6 but i could be mistaken


Indeed, that is an A6.

In reference to ts, keep trying is the thing you need. Even if it's just for two minutes a day, pick up the guitar and hold your fingers in the A position. Strum, strum, readjust until it sounds good, and strum. In no time at all you'll be rattling off a brutal A chord riff like it's second nature.
#22
Quote by Kevin T
So the question is - is it worth spending the extra on the hard topped model and what are Cort guitars like?


You'd probably get a much more detailed answer in GG&A forum on this site. I frequent it a lot, but I'm afraid I don't know enough about cort guitars to offer an opinion.
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#23
Quote by biased644
barre them with your one finger. who cares about the high e string.

This is what I do, except I'm kinda of double jointed I think, I can barre it and leave the E string alone, give that a try.
#24
Start with an A5, you only use two fingers and strike 3 strings. When you're ready add the little finger and complete the chord. 'Course im a lazy guitarist so im probably not the best for advice, but stick with it cos its worth the blisters!
#25
This thread has been really helpful. I have small hands too, and I have problems with C, it's nice to know it's not just me.
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#26
Yeap chords is all about practice. At the beggining you get the feeling you would never be able to do this. Doesn't matter it makes funny noises at the start. Keep practicing the right way and one day it would click!!