#1
1. i was crawling the stickys and i never says if oil based stain (teh kind in hardware stores) is alright to use, on the sites that sell stain for guitar they are water or alcohol based. Is it alright to use oil based??


2. Also, is there a difference between wood filler and grain filler?
Gear?!
____________
Gibson Classic White Les Paul Studio
Carvin DC-145

Fender Champion 600

Weeping Demon Wah
Metal Muff
Blues Driver


Member 6 of the CARVIN CLUB!!

Ibanez S320 Budget:
0/500usd
#2
if you use oil-based you better not screw it up. you use water based and a spot comes darker than the rest you can blend it with a wet clothe or something, same with alcohol. that is if you c an even use oil-based. ive never used it.
#3
What you really want to pay attention to in choosing a stain is whether it's a pigment-based stain or water-soluble dye stain. I'd say choose water-soluble dye stains for ease of use. If your staining figured maple (quilted, curly, tiger/flame, etc), then definitely choose water-soluble dye stains. Pigment-based stains are made using a very fine powder suspended in it to give the color and DO NOT bring out the best in figured maples. So, stick with water-soluble dye stains.

As for wood filler and grain filler...they're really not the same. Wood filler is for the most part a paste made of saw dust and is great for repairing chips, etc. in furnature. Grain filler is exactly what it says. It fills the the grain of open-grain wood. It's always used with wood like mahogany. As a matter of fact, it's essential for mahogany. For maple, a closed-grain wood, it's not necessary to use. I always use clear liquid grain filler. For the most part, you just pore it on the wood, use a soft plastic straight edge of some type to then work the grain filler into the grain. This is simply done by smearing the grain filler back and forth at a 45 degree angle to the grain. Use your judgement on how thick you lay it on. Technically, you trying to work it into the grain and scrape it off the surface. I usually leave a film on the whole surface. Let it dry, then sand it smooth...if you leave a film of the stuff, sand down to remove the film and no further. Repeat if necessary. I usually get the clear grain filler from stewart macdonald. I think they also offer it tinted to match the general color of the wood, but, I like the clear stuff myself. Like I said before, if your staining maple, don't bother with grain filler.
#4
If you use an oil-based stain, I don't think you can use clear coat laquer over it. Oil makes the surface "slippery", maybe not noticeable to touch but the laquer won't stick. You'll have to choose one or the other. So if you want a clear finish, avoid oil-based dyes.
#5
oooo, ok. thanks alot
Gear?!
____________
Gibson Classic White Les Paul Studio
Carvin DC-145

Fender Champion 600

Weeping Demon Wah
Metal Muff
Blues Driver


Member 6 of the CARVIN CLUB!!

Ibanez S320 Budget:
0/500usd