#1
So my birthday is in 2 weeks and im looking to spend that extra cash i get on a mixer. Im looking for a mixer that i can use to record on my macbook and that i can also use to gig with for vocals/keyboard. Im going to keep my budget at $200 (USA) and under.
Would a Behringer PMH2000 Europower Powered Mixer suit my needs? I know its more of a PA system, but would it work well as a mixer? Or should i just invest in a non-powered mixer at first?

http://www.guitarcenter.com/Behringer-PMH2000-Europower-Powered-Mixer-102085909-i1153483.gc

I already have a 1/4 jack to a usb so that is already taken care of.

Any advice is apreciated!

'67 Gibson SG Standard
MXR Phase 90 | Ibanez Tubescreamer TS9 | Vox V847A Wah-Wah
'65 Fender Bassman
#2
Stay away from the behringer mixers. Nothing but problems here.Spend a little more and get into the yamaha usb stuff.
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#3
But im also looking for a powered amp to also use for mics and keyboards, what would be my best option?

'67 Gibson SG Standard
MXR Phase 90 | Ibanez Tubescreamer TS9 | Vox V847A Wah-Wah
'65 Fender Bassman
#4
You dont need a mixer to record...

I'll have this moved but since I will eventually anyways...

You need an interface which has on board Preamps and at least one XLR input. A guitar/instrument input would be nice too. An interface bypasses your sound card in the laptop. Just be sure that mac laptop is fast enough to keep up with your software and hardware.

Powered mixers are for PA setups...not recording and behringer is a brand to stay away from when recording...

For 200 you can get a firewire interface (Mackie Onyx Satellite) which is a killer product and has a good amount inputs/outputs.

USB mixers and interfaces mix down to a single stereo track so they are useless IMO.
Firewire interfaces and mixers can transmit more data at one time so they keep channels/inputs separate which is killer when it comes to recording and processing. This means if you record guitar and keyboard at the same time you could add FX to the guitar in editing without doing that to the keys which would mess them up a lot...

R&R, read the stickies, *Reported to have this moved*
Last edited by moody07747 at Mar 30, 2008,
#5
But the keywords are to gig with.
Tom Anderson Hollow Classic
72 thin line tele

Barber trifecta fuzz
Mi audio Crunch Box
Clyde Wah
Barber Burn Unit
Ocean efx Texas deuce
Boomerang chorus delay
Barber ltd


1971 Pro reverb
Fender acoustasonic
Fender super champ xd
#6
I know this is totaly off topic, but wouldent most venue's already have gear to plug into and use? (as in a PA system and mic setup) I suppose im looking for more of a home recording system and home practicing setup.

Edit: i'd also like to add that im going to be using Logic for recording. Right now i have an M-Audio Audio Buddy preamp and direct box. (im using the MXL 990/991 package)
http://www.guitarcenter.com/M-Audio-Audio-Buddy-100387450-i1154049.gc

Would this be good for the time being?

I'm still not totaly clear why an "interface" would be better off than a mixer.

'67 Gibson SG Standard
MXR Phase 90 | Ibanez Tubescreamer TS9 | Vox V847A Wah-Wah
'65 Fender Bassman
Last edited by AndrewDulina at Mar 30, 2008,
#7
Could someone please explain why an "interface" would me more useful to me than a mixer?

'67 Gibson SG Standard
MXR Phase 90 | Ibanez Tubescreamer TS9 | Vox V847A Wah-Wah
'65 Fender Bassman
#8
It'll allow you to record separate tracks onto your computer, then you can use the built-in mixers of any music software to adjust their levels.
#9
Quote by AndrewDulina
Could someone please explain why an "interface" would me more useful to me than a mixer?


Mixers that are capable of analog to digital conversion usually mix tracks down to a single stereo track before sending to the PC. So if you have a 16 channel mixer with drums, guitar(s), bass running through it. After a take, you notice you need to eq the snare because it sounds harsh, or your getting a low end rumble from your guitar cab you need to cut with out affecting the bass guitar. It will be very hard to accomplish that with a stereo track with all instruments mixed in. You'd have to record it again...

An interface will allow you to send each track of audio unmixed, so you can edit, mix, and process each individual track independently. This gives you TONS of room to work. Even with a 4 input interface you could record (track at a time) any setup and as many channels as your software can handle.
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Last edited by Death-Speak at Mar 31, 2008,
#10
Quote by Death-Speak
Mixers that are capable of analog to digital conversion usually mix tracks down to a single stereo track before sending to the PC. So if you have a 16 channel mixer with drums, guitar(s), bass running through it. After a take, you notice you need to eq the snare because it sounds harsh, or your getting a low end rumble from your guitar cab you need to cut with out affecting the bass guitar. It will be very hard to accomplish that with a stereo track with all instruments mixed in. You'd have to record it again...

An interface will allow you to send each track of audio unmixed, so you can edit, mix, and process each individual track independently. This gives you TONS of room to work. Even with a 4 input interface you could record (track at a time) any setup and as many channels as your software can handle.



thanks this information enlightened me alot.

again this is off topic but im qurious, why do studios use mixers if some sort of interface would be more effective when recording all tracks seperate?

'67 Gibson SG Standard
MXR Phase 90 | Ibanez Tubescreamer TS9 | Vox V847A Wah-Wah
'65 Fender Bassman
#12
be aware that there are USB interfaces which take in lots of tracks at one time but they will mix them down.

If you want to record more than two mono tracks at one time you will NEED a firewire interface like the PreSonus FireStudio Project.

That behringer amp is of no use at all.....in the studio...

Quote by AndrewDulina
thanks this information enlightened me alot.

again this is off topic but im qurious, why do studios use mixers if some sort of interface would be more effective when recording all tracks seperate?



Most studios don't have a mixer at all, unless they are running a large analog recording setup with a reel to reel master recorder. When you walk into a studio these days you will most likely see a control surface/interface and in the machine room there will be the DAW (digital audio workstation which is a computer).



These units record to the DAW and make it feel like you are working on a traditional analog board(easier than using a mouse) but its all digital and all your tracks are kept separate on the software.

An example of a fairly large but compact and portable multi track digital setup would be the Yamaha 01V96V2 paired with the Alesis HD24 recorder. The mixer is small but does quite a bit and when paired with a standard computer you can change many settings and setup automation no the tracks. The software also has a digital patch bay and FX meaning you dont need to buy all the analog patch pays and other rack mount gear which really gets your price up...
Last edited by moody07747 at Mar 31, 2008,
#13
yea im not ready to drop $500 on an interface just yet. this equipment adds up quickley.

is this correct? the mixer goes into the interface, and the interface goes into the sound card? is there any way to just go from the mixer to the sound card or is the interface nessesary?

also, wouldent a USB interface create latency? im looking for something where i can hear vocals as i sing.


edit: that is very interesting, maybe i have the wrong idea about buying a mixer and should just invest on an interface.

'67 Gibson SG Standard
MXR Phase 90 | Ibanez Tubescreamer TS9 | Vox V847A Wah-Wah
'65 Fender Bassman
#14
Quote by AndrewDulina
yea im not ready to drop $500 on an interface just yet. this equipment adds up quickley.

is this correct? the mixer goes into the interface, and the interface goes into the sound card? is there any way to just go from the mixer to the sound card or is the interface nessesary?

also, wouldent a USB interface create latency? im looking for something where i can hear vocals as i sing.


edit: that is very interesting, maybe i have the wrong idea about buying a mixer and should just invest on an interface.


no an interface is used on its own most of the time since its got on board inputs and preamps for mics and instruments. Example being the Toneport from line6. you can easily plug in a mic and guitar and record on the spot with just a PC....not the best interface though....

An interface bypasses a stock sound card(one thats already in your PC) and uses the interface as the new sound input and output source. This is much better for quality recordings.

A USB 2.0 interfac should have little/no interface assuming you have USB 2.0 ports on your computer. If not its better to setup with a firewire interface IMO. Both USB2.0 and firewire transfer at the same speed and have such a small amount of latency that you would monitor and hear yourself as you record.


Mixers are for analog recording setups (tapes...money..) and live use (PA setups for a large stage), Digital consoles and interfaces are for recording and keep tracks seperate. Basically you dont need a mixer in the home studio these days with a good interface.


Some info to look at

Interfaces:
http://www.tweakheadz.com/soundcards_for_the_home_studio.htm

buying gear:
http://www.tweakheadz.com/on_buying_studio_gear.html

MTRs (for portable recording) (not easy to edit on):
http://www.tweakheadz.com/multi_track_recorders.htm

Mixers:
http://www.tweakheadz.com/choosing_a_mixer_for_your_studio.html

Control Surface:
http://www.tweakheadz.com/control_surfaces.htm

You may want to go to the message board and see what the best interface is for your price range. Look everything up and understand everything before buying at a store since guys selling gear at places like guitar center try to get people to buy gear they don't need all the time...

If you have 2.0 USB ports on your PC and no firewire, go with the E-MU 0404 interface. If you want to use firewire at around the same price the Mackie Onyx Satellite firewire interface is great for the price. Pair that with a computer and mic and you can start recording.

As for recording software, start out with Reaper and get to know it well...unless you plan on buying software of some kind.
Last edited by moody07747 at Mar 31, 2008,
#15
The macbook i am buying does have firewire so im going to try to stick to that.

Since were on the topic, i bought the MXL 990/991 with Audio buddy m-audio preamp/direct box. Would you suggest using this or buying a new interface.
I used the audio buddy with a 1/4 to usb input and i recieved an enormous amount of latency and quality loss.

'67 Gibson SG Standard
MXR Phase 90 | Ibanez Tubescreamer TS9 | Vox V847A Wah-Wah
'65 Fender Bassman
#16
All you're lacking to record then is a firewire interface. You can pick one up from musicians friend for less that $200. Check out PreSonus Inspire and the Yamaha G046. They are both within your budget and each offer 2 analog inputs that you can record simultaneously. I'm sure they are both able to daisy chain as well in case you want to expand.

Looks like you've already got some decent mics too.

DS
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#17
thanks DS!!

'67 Gibson SG Standard
MXR Phase 90 | Ibanez Tubescreamer TS9 | Vox V847A Wah-Wah
'65 Fender Bassman
Last edited by AndrewDulina at Mar 31, 2008,