#1
Hey everyone, me and one of my friends are starting a two man blues group. I want to learn some blues stuff before we start when we move into our dorm next year. i know my pentatonic scales in all 5 positions but does anyone know anything i can use to teach myself some good stuff? are there any good books or videos or anything. i have been playing for a few years now so i dont need a beginners book, any thing but that, but i just need a good intro do blues supplement. can anyone help me out? thanks a ton!
GEAR:
1959 Vintage Gibson Melody Maker
Fender Stratocaster
Martin OMM
Epi Les Paul Std
Pitchblack
Dunlop Wah
EHX Russian Big Muff
EHX Holy Grail Reverb
Palomino V16

For pictures of my gear click http://s464.photobucket.com/albums/rr8/spoutz/Guitar Gear/?albumview=grid nao!

-Matt

Sláinte

#2
learn the blues scales it has one more note than the pentatonic scale...

eg:
a minor pentatonic scale + d# = a minor blues scale.
#3
Blues Brothers did some classic bluesy stuff

Boom Boom by John Lee Hooker
Dust My Broom by Elmore James
Rockin' shit
#4
i know the blues pentatonic thing but does anyone know any good supplements or should i just start putting those together into songs?
GEAR:
1959 Vintage Gibson Melody Maker
Fender Stratocaster
Martin OMM
Epi Les Paul Std
Pitchblack
Dunlop Wah
EHX Russian Big Muff
EHX Holy Grail Reverb
Palomino V16

For pictures of my gear click http://s464.photobucket.com/albums/rr8/spoutz/Guitar Gear/?albumview=grid nao!

-Matt

Sláinte

#7
The blues scale is mostly an overall structure for a certain type of blues sound.
It really doesn't have all the notes you're likely to want to use.

If you're dealing with major blues, arpeggiate the chords and notice which
notes aren't in the blues scale. Those are prime ones to add in. Further
you can look to major pentatonics and mixolydian modes for each of the
I, IV and V chords.
#8
+1 to edg, especially when dealing with major blues. Though the blues scale has a minor third, in a major blues, the major third is absolutely fair game. b9's also sound surprisingly alright. Major 6ths are great too. And of course scale degrees alone are nothing without phrasing, but that applies to any genre I guess. Also, when you're working with a major blues, keep in mind how undiatonic the changes are.I tend to look at the I7, IV7, and V7 almost as three seperate keys. Up to you to discover your own approach.
#11
you should definately play some g3. if your unfamiliar with them it is joe satriani, steve vai, and eric johnson. you will definately pick up some good blues methods listening to them and playing their stuff. its pretty advanced though.