#1
I was wondering if any experienced players could give me any tips or advice that could allow me to change chords more quickly. Right now there's like a 1-2 second pause in changing chords and it really makes the songs I practice on sound bad. Any advice?
#3
Comes with practice, obviously. But also look for shorcuts, so you only have to move fingers that you have to move and not your entire hand.
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#4
what i did when i started was play all chords at a constant rate, and just go between them but still stay on the beat, slow it down if you need to...
#5
I am sort of new to guitar, and I'm having the same trouble. Like mix.lunar said, practice helps a lot. I use this as a reference.
#6
yeah you just need to practice to change chord speed faster. Try some basic songs like Wild Thing or Highway to Hell those songs are just the same chords repeated over and over and you'll get to the point where your fingers will automatically form the chord shape when you see it. hope this helps
#7
The mistake a lot of beginners make it to hold a chord down until the very last strum. Say you're strumming each chord in a progression 4 times. You need to take your fingers off the strings after the third strum, and strum the forth strum with either open strings or with just the fingers that are holding the same strings in both chords. These open stringed strums are what I call transitions chords. Try to get your hand into the shape of the chord even before you put your fingers on the strings. The transition strum is what gives you the time to find the next chord. Try not to 'freeze' your hand until you have strummed the transition- find the shape as soon as possible.
#8
Everybody has this problem. Just practice. I don't reccommend fretwear's "transition chords," personally. It sounds sloppy to me when people play open strings for chord changes.

Also, you usually don't have to reposition your entire hand every time you change chords. Chords often have notes in common. For example, C major and A minor both have the first fret on the B string and the second fret on the D string, so you don't have to move those fingers. You probably already know this, but I didn't realize it when I first started playing.
#9
Quote by fretwear
The mistake a lot of beginners make it to hold a chord down until the very last strum. Say you're strumming each chord in a progression 4 times. You need to take your fingers off the strings after the third strum, and strum the forth strum with either open strings or with just the fingers that are holding the same strings in both chords. These open stringed strums are what I call transitions chords. Try to get your hand into the shape of the chord even before you put your fingers on the strings. The transition strum is what gives you the time to find the next chord. Try not to 'freeze' your hand until you have strummed the transition- find the shape as soon as possible.


I definitely recommend that you DON'T do what fretwear is telling you.
#10
yeah, when im playing i dont hold the chord until the very end of the beat. Sometimes you hear that 'chicken scratch' in between chords (easier to hear on acoustic) because the guitarist is switching so that the next chord lands on the beat, which is more important than a chord you've already heard strummed 8 times.
#11
Quote by fretwear
The mistake a lot of beginners make it to hold a chord down until the very last strum. Say you're strumming each chord in a progression 4 times. You need to take your fingers off the strings after the third strum, and strum the forth strum with either open strings or with just the fingers that are holding the same strings in both chords. These open stringed strums are what I call transitions chords. Try to get your hand into the shape of the chord even before you put your fingers on the strings. The transition strum is what gives you the time to find the next chord. Try not to 'freeze' your hand until you have strummed the transition- find the shape as soon as possible.


unless you want to play in key all the time...

anyways, you just need to make sure you are moving the least number of fingers the least number of frets and strings, and to make bar chords wherever practical. other than that, it's practice and personal preference. it's always best to practice till it's right than to fudge the chords. You'll eventually have a default fingering for certain types of chords that works best for you. it's always good to know more than one way to do each chord though.
#12
Watch your hand shift from one chord from the next, and minimize the movement needed. Your fingers don't need to be an inch away from the fretboard to change chords. Just point A to point B.
* Nobody likes WootSticks
#13
Right now there's like a 1-2 second pause in changing chords and it really makes the songs I practice on sound bad. Any advice?

be clear of the length of pause , try for instance : Am 4 strums (then count 4 for a rest )then Dm 4 strums (count 4 for a rest )
also it is important to strum them slowly .
Id say be clear on being able to strum quavers and crochets ( also known as 1/4 notes and 1/8 th notes . )

So A quick overview:
I suggest you write a 4 bar chord progression , with you counting and not playing on bars 2 and 4 .
Also try a develope a strum pattern using crochets and quavers , you can email me with the results and ill try and help you some more .
Damien Redmond - "Grade 8 electric guitar" -"Grade 5 theory "
"Licentiate Diploma of the London college of music "
#14
What I always tell my (few) students is that they should let their right hand lead... and by that, I mean: Don't focus on getting the chord JUST RIGHT when you are practicing, focus, instead, on your right hand, keep the time, the rhythm and let your left hand be enslaved by the right... it takes a little time, but whn you really stop FOCUSING on the left hand fingering of chords, it just comes faster... it's like it doesn't like being ignored. Try it... it worked for me. Outside of this, just turn on your metronome on 40bpm and strum one chord per click... switch around the chord sequences in the major scale (just triads) then add the extended chords and odd shaped ones as you progress... just sit down for about an hour a day... spend the first 20 minutes on this, then go to the strumming stuff, remembering to let your right hand lead.
#16
Quote by fretwear
The mistake a lot of beginners make it to hold a chord down until the very last strum. Say you're strumming each chord in a progression 4 times. You need to take your fingers off the strings after the third strum, and strum the forth strum with either open strings or with just the fingers that are holding the same strings in both chords. These open stringed strums are what I call transitions chords. Try to get your hand into the shape of the chord even before you put your fingers on the strings. The transition strum is what gives you the time to find the next chord. Try not to 'freeze' your hand until you have strummed the transition- find the shape as soon as possible.


i'd hate to hear you play