#1
OK, so lately I've been trying to make up my own riffs as practice for when I make a band. But the only thing I can come up with are Drop C power chord riffs.

I want to make better riffs.

Any advice on anything I can try?
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#2
try using pedal notes, or using intervals. Another thing that helps is if you find that you keep doing the same thing, make a conscious effort to NOT do that thing.
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#4
Hear the riff in your head and then try to play it.

This will annoy the hell out of you at first, but if you can do this with some proficiency, your playing will improve dramatically.
#5
Quote by YourDad
OK, so lately I've been trying to make up my own riffs as practice for when I make a band. But the only thing I can come up with are Drop C power chord riffs.

I want to make better riffs.

Any advice on anything I can try?


Listen to, and learn songs that dont utilize drop C tuning. try some different styles...... getting different influences.

Also there is nothing wrong with Drop C power chord riffs. Keep messing with those as well.
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Last edited by GuitarMunky at Mar 30, 2008,
#6
Quote by GuitarMunky
Listen to, and learn songs that dont utilize drop C tuning. try some different styles...... getting different influences.

Also there is nothing wrong with Drop C power chord riffs. Keep messing with those as well.



This, I do. My favorite tunings are Drop C, Drop D and standard.

I play a lot of Lamb of God, so theres my Drop D.
To me:
Quote by crazy8rgood

In fact, I almost ALWAYS agree with YourDad.

Quote by itchy guitar
One of the best replies ever.

In the same thread

Do you love Arsis?
#8
I don't think most people write good riffs be deciding "I'm going to write a good riff." It just comes to them. Don't try to rush it.

I come up with a lot of riffs while playing with effects. That might help you too.
#9
If you are stuck in a rut you have to conciously train yourself to think outside the box. For example, try using bizarre combinations of notes in a scale and always try to do something a little different than what you're used to.

Basically, writing riffs is a skill that you can make progress in like any other, it just takes time and experimentation. Creativity helps as well obviously.
#10
Quote by bangoodcharlote
Hear the riff in your head and then try to play it.

This will annoy the hell out of you at first, but if you can do this with some proficiency, your playing will improve dramatically.



That's what I do. Of course my brain ends up being out of tune with my guitar and I just end up with something different that I like.
#11
I usually sit down with my guitar before going to bed and simply try to figure out good sounding odd patterns accross the fretboard... things that are technical and what-not, but also pleasing to my ear... then it just evolves slowly and gets mixed with other stuff from the guys in the band.

I usually figure out a song and try to write another song in the same vein, without allowing myself to use the same rythms, tempos, sequences, harmonies or whatever... it was initually an experiment an old buddy (great classical guitarist) layed on me... and it was very challenging at first... but it worked wonders for me... so... copy a song... without copying anything at all... all you have to copy is the overall feel of it.

hmmm... that was wierd...
#12
Quote by MacDizzy
That's what I do. Of course my brain ends up being out of tune with my guitar and I just end up with something different that I like.


And that's no good... if you can, hum whatever is in your head and record it... then figure it out... don't let your head get led around by what your ears are currently hearing... let your fingers obey what is in your head... then you will hear whats in your head... believe it or not... it helps to train your ear by simply singing a note and finding it on the guitar (at first it's hard not to change what you sing to match what you play, but that's the point!)

Best of luck.