#1
I am asking this question in this forum because I feel it relates to gear and its customization best. Please do not tear me up if I have the wrong forum. I did read the rules and faq's, in fact I read them tonight!

I just got (yet another, my first one was stolen) another Korg MA30 metronome.

I opened it up to install the batteries and noticed on the board what looked to be a set of crystals. (I know these from my R/C days)

Could anyone with more electronics know-how than me shed light on weather these are in fact crystals, and if in fact they are, what their function is in a metronome?

Thanks,

Greg
Fender 60th Anniv MIM Strat (SD Little 59er Br)
Agile AL-2000 Rootbeer Flame (GFS Vtg '59)
Fender Hot Rod Deluxe
GFS Chorus
DS-1
#3
Sounds to me like they are Quartz crystals!

Does this metronome also have a built in tuner perhaps? This could be the function of these 'crystals'.

Are you familiar with sound and pitch? Well anyways..... ever noticed on a tuner it will say A = 440 hz???? Well when a sound is produced, it is really the air that is making the sound as it compresses and decompresses from the pressure of the sound coming. For instance, when you pluck your guitar string it vibrates so many times a second.. If you pluck the A string (when tuned), it will vibrate up and down 440 times a second hence the A = 440!!! The A note is used as a universal standard for tuning so that everyone can play in the same key/pitch/note and sound good! Every string (whether it be piano or guitar is tuned according to its deviance from 440hz) Before this standard came into play, people would tune to whatever was nearest already preset, like a church organ! I pity the traveling musician, always having to retune to the local keys!

So what does this have to do with the crystals? EVERYTHING!!! When you pluck your guitar string, it pulses however many times a second. The crystal (quartz, has to be quartz!!) coincidentally, will vibrate at 440 vibrations a second upon hearing ANY sound. So when you are tuning, the machine you use is comparing your guitar or strings vibrations to that of the vibrating quartz crystal going 440 times a second, or making the A note. So when tuning the A string, it will tell you whether or not you need to increase or decrease tension on the strings to match vibrations perfectly, thus creating a perfectly tuned guitar!

A Quartz tuner is legendary for tuning perfectly because the quartz will vibrate perfectly. Hence why when you tune with a 'digital' tuner, you may be off by a couple 'cents' or hz because there is no crystal to match too, only a digital preference that has been installed.
Last edited by Lastin at Mar 31, 2008,
#4
Yes, actually, they are quartz crystals.

Thanks a bunch for totally raising my level of knowledge.

I am glad that I asked because it was such a familiar component and also the last one I expected to be in my metronome.

-Greg
Fender 60th Anniv MIM Strat (SD Little 59er Br)
Agile AL-2000 Rootbeer Flame (GFS Vtg '59)
Fender Hot Rod Deluxe
GFS Chorus
DS-1
#5
Also, quartz are used in metronomes to the same way they are used in watches, to maintain accuracy so you have a steady beat. Be careful with metronomes when learning some songs, metros can take away that 'groove' feeling of a song.