#1
I got a small question about scales that's been bugging me for a long time. I tried reading the Guitar Theory sticky thread, but I can't seem to find the answer there either (or if it is there, then it probably means didn't understand it).

Anyway, I was looking at the Pentatonic scale, and I read that each scale has different 'shapes', and I was pretty much confused at the function of these 'shapes'.

Is the shape bound to its positioning? Like, is the first shape of the Pentatonic scale bound to only to the first three frets and the open notes? Or are these shapes interchangeable? If they are interchangeable, what makes it so?

Also, how can you do you derive chords from a scale? Like, what chords to play to go along with a scale? I know there are websites and stuff for this, but I wanna know the theory beside it, because I assumed, for example, the A major scale would probably go well with the A major chord, but how do the other chords fit in?

I'm a huge beginner in theory, and reading all these stuff about root notes and scales and shapes and modes are kinda making my head hurt.
#2
Right...

Your box shape is purely positional so that you can reach all notes of the scale you're playing in without moving your hand to another position.

Deriving chords from a scale is done thus:

1) Choose your scale
A Major

2) Examine the notes of that scale
A B C# D E F# G# A

3) See which chords contain those notes
A Major: A C# E, B Minor: B D F#...

You should end up with
A Major
B Minor
C# Minor
D Major
E Major
F# Minor
G# Diminished
#3
Scales are not shapes, they are collections of notes. You can play those notes in any order, anywhere on the fretboard. Chords are generally constructed by stacking thirds, but this is an incredibly complicated subject and be found in the Theory Sticky (read it)
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#5
Oh, I think I kind of get it. So, an Am Pentatonic scale consists of the 5 pentatonic shapes, except they are placed differently where Am is the root note?

So, shapes can be played anywhere on the fretboard, but their positioning determines which key it's in?

Thanks for the help, and the quick replies.
#6
Am is not the root note. Am is not a note. A is the root and the intervals between the root and the octave determine what scale and voicing it is.
#7
Quote by guessmynamebich
Oh, I think I kind of get it. So, an Am Pentatonic scale consists of the 5 pentatonic shapes, except they are placed differently where Am is the root note?

So, shapes can be played anywhere on the fretboard, but their positioning determines which key it's in?

Thanks for the help, and the quick replies.


The shapes aren't important, to learn scales you need to learn the notes they contain

The Am pentatonic scale consists of these notes
A C D E G

...that's it. So you can play those notes anywhere on the fretboard and you'll be using Am pentatonic. The shapes are simply where those notes occur on the freboard.

They help you use the scale, but you need to actually learn what the scale is before you can use it effectively.
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#8
Oh, okay, I get it now.

So basically, shapes are WHERE the notes of the scale are on the fretboard (depending on which is the scale's root note).
They aren't really part of the scale or anything other than to serve as a guideline.

That's it, right?

So, does that also mean the chords A C D E G goes along with the Am Pentatonic scale?
#9
Quote by guessmynamebich
Oh, okay, I get it now.

So basically, shapes are WHERE the notes of the scale are on the fretboard (depending on which is the scale's root note).
They aren't really part of the scale or anything other than to serve as a guideline.

That's it, right?

So, does that also mean the chords A C D E G goes along with the Am Pentatonic scale?


They're a guideline for ease of use, but you need to know how to use the scale before the shapes are in any way useful.

And not the chords A, C, D, E, G, the notes. That means the chords containing those notes are good for use.
#10
I think if you were able to identify scale shapes with chord shapes you might fare slightly better.

So see each pentatonic box related to an A minor chord shape in different parts of the neck.

Or ....Learn the CAGED system.
#11
Quote by guessmynamebich
So, does that also mean the chords A C D E G goes along with the Am Pentatonic scale?


You're implying that all of those are major chords; they're not. To fit in with the key of A Minor, you'll want Am, C, Dm, Em and G.