#1
Well, is there a difference between pinch and artificial harmonics? If yes, then what is it?


By the way, I watched and heard Michael Angelo Batio perform tapped harmonics and I can clearly hear the harmonics there. Well, I know that its a tapping done one octave higher than the fretted note, but I can't produce that harmonics. Is there something I'm missing about my technique???
#2
yes there is a difference.

pinched harmonics require you to dig in with the flesh of your thumb right after you pick the note (follow through with the picking action and let the flesh graze the string).

artificial harmonics is when you fret a note, say 3rd fret on the B string, and then you place a finger from your picking hand over the fret that is 12 frets higher than the fret you are fretting with your fretting hand. you lightly touch the string with your picking hand's finger like you were playing a natural harmonic.
Does anyone remember laughter?

Manuel, please try to understand before one of us DIES.

my gear:

Gibson LP Standard
Epiphone SG
Classical guitar
Peavey ValveKing 112
Marshall MG15
BOSS ME-50
#4
Quote by chillrock
yes there is a difference.

pinched harmonics require you to dig in with the flesh of your thumb right after you pick the note (follow through with the picking action and let the flesh graze the string).

artificial harmonics is when you fret a note, say 3rd fret on the B string, and then you place a finger from your picking hand over the fret that is 12 frets higher than the fret you are fretting with your fretting hand. you lightly touch the string with your picking hand's finger like you were playing a natural harmonic.

No, that is a tapped harmonic.
#5
Quote by domenic_665
So does that mean that artificial and tapped harmonics are the same?


The term 'artificial harmonic' covers both pinch and tapped harmonics, and maybe even some more ways of playing harmonics.
#6
Quote by chillrock
yes there is a difference.

pinched harmonics require you to dig in with the flesh of your thumb right after you pick the note (follow through with the picking action and let the flesh graze the string).

artificial harmonics is when you fret a note, say 3rd fret on the B string, and then you place a finger from your picking hand over the fret that is 12 frets higher than the fret you are fretting with your fretting hand. you lightly touch the string with your picking hand's finger like you were playing a natural harmonic.


thats wrong dude. what your calling artificial harmonics is actually called bell harmonics.
#7
An artificial harmonic is any harmonic played on a fretted, rather than open note. This includes tapped and pinched harmonics.

Tapped harmonics are when you fret a note with your left hand and with your right hand tap and release on a fret higher up the fretboard to produce a harmonic.

Pinched harmonics are where you use a finger or thumb on your picking hand to touch a harmonic node past the end of the fretboard.

If you're having trouble with tapped harmonics, it's likely because you're not tapping exactly on the fret, or you're too slow releasing the string so muting it too much.
#9
Quote by jucsville
thats wrong dude. what your calling artificial harmonics is actually called bell harmonics.


okay, it seems there are different names for the same technique. i learned it as "artificial harmonic".
Does anyone remember laughter?

Manuel, please try to understand before one of us DIES.

my gear:

Gibson LP Standard
Epiphone SG
Classical guitar
Peavey ValveKing 112
Marshall MG15
BOSS ME-50
#10
Quote by jucsville
thats wrong dude. what your calling artificial harmonics is actually called bell harmonics.


It's usually referred to as a tap harmonic, because you're tapping the fret an octave up to sound the harmonic.
#11
Pinch Harmonic: Harmonic node point is created by the side of the picking hand thumb just after striking the string.

Harp Harmonic: Pointer is held lightly against the string at certain spots (generally frets), and the string is picked by the right hand, after which the pointer is removed.

Tapped harmonic: The string is tapped directly over the metal fret a certain space away from the fretted note. The tap is very short, with near immediate removal of the finger. These don't have to be one octave up either. None of them do.


ALL OF THESE ARE ARTIFICIAL HARMONICS.