#1
I've had a problem with my strat recently. When I touch the bottom 2 strings or bridge I get this kindof dull clicking sound through the amp.

At first I thought it might have been because the jack plate was slightly loose but I've fixed that.

Is this a wiring problem of some sort? And is it dangerous to keep playing?
#3
Strats, and most production guitars aren't really grounded and shielded very well. I have a method for doing it, but too much to post here. I got it from a site quite awhile ago, I think its Guitarnutz.
Go to wiring diagrams in you search engine. What you're looking for is something like "Taming the Wild Strat", or something like that. I do a little less intense version, but it works. The Strats I've done it to don't hum/buzz whatever, and I think they actually sound better. Good luck.
#4
Dude, i think i got the same problem with my strat as well. dont know wat to do with it
#5
1. when you say you fixed the jack, did you spin the jack to tighten it, or did you remove the plate and tighten, holding the inside as well.
if you just hand tightened it you may have spun the jack on the inside, and the wires might be crossed and causing a click.

2. if it's not the jack then shielding will help.
you will need to remove the strings then the guard, then layer self adhesive copper foil in the cavity, and on the back of the guard (remove the pickups from the guard too)
and then overlap some foil to a guard screw, and when you screw the guard back on, you'll help ground the guitar.

3. make sure all of ur ground wires, uncluding the wire in the trem cavity is attached.
Jenneh

Quote by TNfootballfan62
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#6
jj1565

You're on the right track. The metal plate for the input needs to be grounded properly. It is hard to describe w/o a diagram, but with Strats you have to make one "common" ground point, and the metal plate must be included. I usually make that point on the face plate, near the input plate. Okay, you have 2 wires going to the jack, yes? Take another length of wire, strip one end, wrap it around one of the screws for the metal plate, and screw it in so it makes contact w/the metal plate. Then run the wire through the hole, strip the other end, and connect it to your "common" ground on the face plate.

Here I am assuming that you know how to do the rest of the shielding. Its pretty straightforward, but if any of the grounds are not bought to one point, your baby is going to be noisy.

This kind of ticks me off. Not just Fender, but others skimp on this too. It is also very important if you use a big PA system. Improper grounding/shielding, can cause serious shocks. A really hi-watt system can kill you.
#7
My music technology lecturer has a saying:
"Electricity equals death"
Get it checked out by a proffesional. If you're inexperienced dont do anything yourself cos a)you might hurt your guitar and b) you might electrocute yourself.
#8
you wont electrocute yourself from working on a guitar. ^
grounding wires and shielding stops the hum. if you get shocked from your guitar is usually an amp problem.
Jenneh

Quote by TNfootballfan62
Jenny needs to sow her wild oats with random Gibsons and Taylors she picks up in bars before she settles down with a PRS.


Set up Questions? ...Q & A Thread

Recognised by the Official EG/GG&A/GB&C WTLT Lists 2011
#9
jj1565

You are at least partially correct, but if you are playing a big rig, and also running a big PA, grounding problems can be a very big deal. That may not be a concern for most players here, but I've seen a friend popped hard by touching his lip to a mic. It was not just the bass he was playing, also bad sound engineers(lol), but his badly grounded bass was a contributing factor. I was using the same system, and only got a couple of minor shocks, because I had addressed that problem.
#10
im actually completely correct.

1. you wont electrocute urself from working on a guitar. (the exception would be battery shock on an active pup, which i think was mentioned somewhere in here.)

2. if you get shocked from ur guitar it's usually ur amp.

if you want to add additional ways to get shocked, that's fine, but doesnt make my post less than accurate.
Jenneh

Quote by TNfootballfan62
Jenny needs to sow her wild oats with random Gibsons and Taylors she picks up in bars before she settles down with a PRS.


Set up Questions? ...Q & A Thread

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#11
Okay jj,
I like you, and what you are saying is true. I've just worked some large venues, and my point is that proper grounding is very important, especially if you're pumping a lot of power. Maybe you will understand when you see a friend go stiff, and then hit the stage like a sandbag. As I said there were other problems, but the only reason it didn't happen to me was because I made sure my rig was working properly. I just don't want anyone to get hurt, because of a stupid mistake.
Fair enough?
#12
can you do me a favor and quote where i was anti-grounding.
because i have no idea where you're coming from.


you are talking to a player who was just electrocuted on stage about 2 weeks ago.

what i'm saying, is that, if you want to add to a post, then add to it.
but ur phrasing insinuates that my post was somehow incorrect.
which at best isnt even "partially correct."
Jenneh

Quote by TNfootballfan62
Jenny needs to sow her wild oats with random Gibsons and Taylors she picks up in bars before she settles down with a PRS.


Set up Questions? ...Q & A Thread

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#13
Easy, guys, I think we get the idea.
Threadstarter, as already covered grounding is indeed usually the culprit when you get any kind of clicking or buzz on contact. If you're comfortable with soldering check the solder points at the volume pot, the wire leading from pots to the trem springs, and the wiring of the input jack. If anything looks dodgy or loose, desolder it and wire it up properly.

And guy_tebache, cheers for reminding us to keep safe, but there's basically zero electrical danger while actually working on a guitar.
That said, a combination of bad guitar wiring and a very old or poorly grounded amp can -very occasionally- discharge a voltage straight into the strings, and thus the player. A lot of players who use vintage amps ensure their guitars are wired flawlessly, sometimes even using resistors in the circuit to reduce the risk of shock.
#14
Thanks kyle62, and jj1565, I'm not looking for a fight. From the threads I've been looking at on this forum, there are quite a few folks here who do not have as much real experience as we do. If you felt I was somehow dis'in' you, I apologize, that was not my intent. If that explanation isn't cool with you, I'll leave you alone from now on, and hopefully no hard feelings.
#15
no chok, honestly i dont care.
i was only trying to tell the kid in post #7 that he's not going to fry while working on a guitar.

i really wasnt commenting on stage use. of course there are real dangers and guys should take care when dealing with gear.
Jenneh

Quote by TNfootballfan62
Jenny needs to sow her wild oats with random Gibsons and Taylors she picks up in bars before she settles down with a PRS.


Set up Questions? ...Q & A Thread

Recognised by the Official EG/GG&A/GB&C WTLT Lists 2011