#1
Is this statement correct?

" Every scale has 7 modes in the sense that the C major scale has 7 modes and the D major scale has 7 modes and so on."

Also to correctly build modes of a scale do you learn the intervals of each mode and then take the complementary root note and build on it, or do you just basically take the next note in the scale and continue writing the scale as it is.

In the case of the C major scale, to build the Dorian it would be a D Dorian and will be:

D E F G A B C D

and the Phrygian would be an F Phrygian and it would be

F G A B C D E F


Please tell me if there are any misconceptions above.
TESTAMENT, SCAR SYMMETRY......SELF EXPLANATORY


ALEX SKOLNICK, PER NILSSON........ADULATION MANDATORY


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#4
E phrygian, not F phrygian. The notes you described would be F lydian. A better description would be "To build E phrygian, you would take the E major scale and flatten the second, third, sixth, and seventh scale degrees".

Modal music is not the same as key based music, and modes have nothing in common with their relative major outside of having the same notes. They are not used in the same situations, and they are not interchangeable.
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#6
Quote by breakstuff
Also to correctly build modes of a scale do you learn the intervals of each mode and then take the complementary root note and build on it


Do this. Learning the unique intervals of each mode is extremely helpful.