#2
Well, it's not ripping off in a legal sense, since you can't copyright chord changes.

In a broader ethical sense, lots of songs have similar-sounding progressions, it's the details that make the song your own. So, if you have a progression that you like that is similar to another song, you can add a new melody, different instrumentation, different chord voicings, rhythms, tempo, maybe even time signature... as long as you don't have a similar chord progression AND a really similar melody, people probably won't say boo.
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#4
If it's VERY similar/the same, it's a rip off. If it sounds kinda or maybe a little like something else, it's not. You simply can't make up a riff that doesn't sound a little like SOMETHING else.
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#5
well it all depends on how similar, like how you play the chords, how fast, and if there are vocals, if the are the same. for example good riddance by green day and so long good bye by sum 41. they both use the same chords, but strum them differently, and have different sounding vocals
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#6
Don't think so, especially in the western scale which is limited to like 12 notes or something A A# B C C# D D# E F F# G G#, there are only so many ways these chords can be composed to sound like 'music'.

With that said, everyone copies everybody. They just might be playing is slow or faster, or whatever. Of course there are exceptions like that wierd metal stuff like Tool and whatnot, still cool stuff of course!
#7
well it depends...if your writing a riff in scales or chords, then its nearly impossible not to rip something off....but using a style i cant see a problem to...if you never heard what you ripped off before then it hardly counts as ripping off
#8
Considering their aren't really that many notes in our usual musical umm... language, it seems to make sense that at one point there will be no new possible combinations. But thats no time soon. As long as the whole song doesn't sound similar your O.K.
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#9
Well, I see a very similar sound between my stuff, and Oasis'. A lot of the chord progressions sound quite similar.
#10
Quote by dude-1
Well, I see a very similar sound between my stuff, and Oasis'. A lot of the chord progressions sound quite similar.
Then you're influenced by Oasis.


To answer your question, no. We talk about common progressions (I IV V; i Vi VII; i VII VI V; I V vi IV) for a reason...they're used all the time!
#11
then every christian pop song rips off every other, theyre all G C D C and Em C G D.
#12
The Canon in D progression has been used in so many pop songs it's ridiculous, and no one calls them ripoffs of each other.
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#13
It's not ripping it off as long as the melody isn't too similar. Chord progressions are recycled all the time.