#1
I've been playing both electric and acoustic guitar for about three years. I've learned the major scale and both the minor and major pentatonic scales. I'm trying really hard, but every time I try to create a solo, it only sounds like I'm playing scales. If anybody could point me to a helpful article, or give me some advice to get really cool sounds out of my guitar, I'd be very thankful. I'd also like to know what the difference is between a solo on an acoustic guitar and an electric. Thanks a lot!
#2
Quote by JacKofAces91
I'd also like to know what the difference is between a solo on an acoustic guitar and an electric.


One is on an acoustic guitar and one is on an electric guitar.
#3
here's an article on UG: a beginner's guide to soloing
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#4
Quote by ViperScale
One is on an acoustic guitar and one is on an electric guitar.


Ohh danngg!!
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#5
1) Feel it, the most important rule to music and essential to soloing

2)Try soloing over a chord progression, best to start with blues. Pick any blues song, find the key and solo over it.

3)Understand where the root is in the scale your playing. If you're not starting and ending on the root, the solo won't sound complete, or kinda all over the place.

4)Practice, nothing works better

Good luck, and most importantly, have fun
#6
Quote by ViperScale
One is on an acoustic guitar and one is on an electric guitar.

C'mon man, I meant along the lines of technique. You wouldn't be able to tap frets on an acoustic the same way you could on an electric. I'm looking for a little bit more of a complex answer.
#7
Quote by yakuza11
1) Feel it, the most important rule to music and essential to soloing

2)Try soloing over a chord progression, best to start with blues. Pick any blues song, find the key and solo over it.

3)Understand where the root is in the scale your playing. If you're not starting and ending on the root, the solo won't sound complete, or kinda all over the place.

4)Practice, nothing works better

Good luck, and most importantly, have fun

Thanks!
#8
Theres really no difference in technique. The only difference is in the tone. Eddie Van Halen begs to differ with you about tapping on an acoustic.
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#9
Quote by JacKofAces91
C'mon man, I meant along the lines of technique. You wouldn't be able to tap frets on an acoustic the same way you could on an electric. I'm looking for a little bit more of a complex answer.


No, really, that's all the difference there is; ask Paul Gilbert. Anything you can do on electric you can do on acoustic.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HJfHW9tVNsE&feature=related

That song was originally recorded on an acoustic.
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