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#3
haha hendrix introduced a new branch of theory

EDIT: every style of music has its own theory behind it. Hendrix introduced a new style of music.
Last edited by Lamrick21 at Mar 31, 2008,
#4
^^which would be what?
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#6
probly not but he was a prodegy, i suggest learning theory because it will help alot with ur playing ability, unless u think u can be as good as hendrix
#8
he didnt know it as theory. he just would listen to songs and then learn them, then he picked up patterns that he liked(what theory is, knowledge of pleasant sounding patterns) and used them or made up his own. that is why much of his work still tends to be using the pentatonics, though he does have quite a bit of experimental work that strays far.
#9
Quote by metallicarulz69
probly not but he was a prodegy, i suggest learning theory because it will help alot with ur playing ability, unless u think u can be as good as hendrix


I know a little theory but its all just boring... I'll learn it more in depth when I continue lessons.
#10
not sure that hes known as the "greatest" guitar player of all time, but def one of the most influential guitar innovators along with jimmy page. both amazing players, self-taught, didnt know much theory, but still were incredible songwriters. imagine how much things would be different if hendrix never died
'69 fender tele thinline semi-hollow
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#11
He absolutely knew theory, even if not by standard names. Do you all mean to tell me that it's coincidence that 90% of his stuff falls in the standard minor pentatonic box?

YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES

Listen to my sig: Shut and learn your theory, n00b!
#13
Quote by guitarman333
not sure that hes known as the "greatest" guitar player of all time, but def one of the most influential guitar innovators along with jimmy page. both amazing players, self-taught, didnt know much theory, but still were incredible songwriters. imagine how much things would be different if hendrix never died

He would have put out a shitty album at some point and everyone would be cured of the delusion that he was the greatest musician to ever live.

And on topic, he didn't know the names of half the things that he played, but his ears told him what was right, and they didn't tend to lead him astray. He's the exception to the rule; he's not an ordinary example, and from the TS's tone, I would wager that he's thinking "If Hendrix didn't need it, than why do I?" So let me cure you of that idea by saying that it takes a very, VERY special individual to be able to do what he did with his skill set, and chances are, if you're on UG rather than playing out than you're not that special individual.
#14
Hendrix didnt have formal theory training, but he had a good ear, and was very creative. Some people train by studying books.... others by listening to and playing music. Hendrix most likely did that later. and as you know, was quite successful with that approach.

Quote by titopuente
He would have put out a shitty album at some point and everyone would be cured of the delusion that he was the greatest musician to ever live.


Hendrix was awesome..... some people take it a bit to far with the "best ever' statements. thats just how people are.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Mar 31, 2008,
#15
^He also spent years touring with musicians and picked things up along the way. Just because you don't have a degree doesn't mean you don't know something.

Quote by titopuente
he didn't know the names of half the things that he played,
Would a rose by any other name still smell as sweet?
#16
People have this huge misconception that music is either written "with or without" theory, which is way off. I write a lot of my own stuff, and before I even sit down and do any writing, I think of most of it in my head. I use my knowledge of theory to make it easy to write down what I hear in my head. If I want to use a certain chord, knowing exactly what that chord is based on what it's made of and how it sounds helps out a lot as opposed to plunking around looking for the right notes. I don't write music by "following theory", because theory isn't a set of rules. Ever.
#17
Quote by bangoodcharlote
^He also spent years touring with musicians and picked things up along the way. Just because you don't have a degree doesn't mean you don't know something.

Would a rose by any other name still smell as sweet?


ofcourse he did. he learned alot of things, from alot of places. just not a theory book. This fact should be no cause for anyone to get defensive about learning theory. its just how it is.
shred is gaudy music
#18
He spent 5 years of his life after quitting the army playing through blues tracks and thereby teaching himself how to play guitar and become a musician that way. It's not very efficent and it shows in the simplicity of his music. I like to think the more you know, the less you know, and Hendrix is a great example of this. He was able to play from his heart through painstaking effort. He learned mostly through experience rather than books of theory. Theory is great and all but you don't always need it. Theory is a great tool to help you write songs, but the audience still has to understand it. Songwriting comes with experience. It's not like you can learn the blues scale in every shape up and down the chord and then walk up to a guy who's been playing blues for 30 years and expect him to think you're good. So no, Hendrix didn't know theory. He played from the heart and communicated this way with his audience.
#20
Quote by mikeman
He spent 5 years of his life after quitting the army playing through blues tracks and thereby teaching himself how to play guitar and become a musician that way. It's not very efficent and it shows in the simplicity of his music. I like to think the more you know, the less you know, and Hendrix is a great example of this. He was able to play from his heart through painstaking effort. He learned mostly through experience rather than books of theory. Theory is great and all but you don't always need it. Theory is a great tool to help you write songs, but the audience still has to understand it. Songwriting comes with experience. It's not like you can learn the blues scale in every shape up and down the chord and then walk up to a guy who's been playing blues for 30 years and expect him to think you're good. So no, Hendrix didn't know theory. He played from the heart and communicated this way with his audience.


some great points. The only thing I would disagree with is that his effort was painstaking. If anything I would say he played effortlessly. I believe playing the guitar was more like talking to him, and I dont think he stuggled much at all.... just played how he played.

Anyway good points though.... thats just my 2 cents on that aspect of it.
shred is gaudy music
#21
Quote by bangoodcharlote
Would a rose by any other name still smell as sweet?

Et tu, Br--Sorry, wrong play (and gender). I'm not implying that he wasn't great at what he did, but there were those that came before and after him that surpassed him, and a lot of the reason why he's held in such high esteem is because he wasn't around for long enough to totally burn out. We didn't get see the decline of his later years like we have with someone like Eric Clapton, and humans like to romanticize.
#24
Quote by titopuente
Et tu, Br--Sorry, wrong play (and gender). I'm not implying that he wasn't great at what he did, but there were those that came before and after him that surpassed him, and a lot of the reason why he's held in such high esteem is because he wasn't around for long enough to totally burn out. We didn't get see the decline of his later years like we have with someone like Eric Clapton, and humans like to romanticize.



ahh ****.... he was great just leave it at that. We all have our own opinions about whos better than who, but in reality thats just our opinions. Rather than look at it like a sports competition where 1 person "surpasses" another..... I would rather see it as an art, where each artist has something unique to offer. That way you can enjoy them all, instead of ranking them.
shred is gaudy music
#25
Quote by bangoodcharlote
^Nice way to dodge my question.

*sigh* Fine...It would depend on what that other name was. If a Rose was given a different name that fit it as perfectly as Rose does, it would probably smell just as nice. On the other hand, if it was given a name like Tampon Popsicle or something equally disgusting, the Tampon Popsicle's scent would be diminished in the eyes (noses?) of the smeller because they would automatically associate the smell with the name. It's the same situation as if Ann Coulter came out and said that we need to be nice to each other. The message is great, but the delivery is imperfect, to say the least.

And now that we've gotten that out of the way, I'll try and divert a little bit of heat by casually mentioning that Jimi Hendrix is one of my favorite guitarists.
#26
I don't know if he knew theory or not but if you are really talented, you don't really need that much theory.
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#27
it doesnt even matter because theory is for explaining music not making it
#29
Quote by Infatuation
I don't know if he knew theory or not but if you are really talented, you don't really need that much theory.


This is a sad, sad statement.

Quote by Tophue
it doesnt even matter because theory is for explaining music not making it


It is descriptive, yes. However, knowledge of music theory will allow you to write without limitations because you know why certain things work or don't work.
Last edited by :-D at Mar 31, 2008,
#30
Playing music without an understanding of theory is much like writing poetry without an understanding of words. Through imitation, you can without a doubt create something amazing and beautiful. But wouldn't your level of expression be greater if you understood what your words meant, and why they worked so well together? An artist who understands how to mix different colors to get the colors he or she wants, will have much more freedom with how they choose to express themselves, rather than simply throwing random colors together, splattering it on a canvas and hoping for the best. Is my point clear enough?

I, personally, find it hard to believe that Jimi Hendrix merely "guessed" which scales would work over his chord progressions. I find it hard to believe that he merely "guessed" which chords would work with other chords. He did as most blues guitarists did at that time; He imitated the sounds that he loved, then took it a step further. But there is a level of personalization in his work that I can't simply pass off as accidental. He also did quite a number of drugs, which no doubt influenced his experimentation and lent a hand in creating his unique sound.

Regardless of what Jimi Hendrix's knowledge and methods were, you are not him, and you never will be. If you are at all serious about being a musician, learn your theory!
#31
^nice.
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#32
Quote by Mud Martian
Playing music without an understanding of theory is much like writing poetry without an understanding of words. Through imitation, you can without a doubt create something amazing and beautiful. But wouldn't your level of expression be greater if you understood what your words meant, and why they worked so well together? An artist who understands how to mix different colors to get the colors he or she wants, will have much more freedom with how they choose to express themselves, rather than simply throwing random colors together, splattering it on a canvas and hoping for the best. Is my point clear enough?

I, personally, find it hard to believe that Jimi Hendrix merely "guessed" which scales would work over his chord progressions. I find it hard to believe that he merely "guessed" which chords would work with other chords. He did as most blues guitarists did at that time; He imitated the sounds that he loved, then took it a step further. But there is a level of personalization in his work that I can't simply pass off as accidental. He also did quite a number of drugs, which no doubt influenced his experimentation and lent a hand in creating his unique sound.

Regardless of what Jimi Hendrix's knowledge and methods were, you are not him, and you never will be. If you are at all serious about being a musician, learn your theory!



not knowing theory does NOT mean that the only thing you can do is "throw random colors together, spattering it on the canvas and hoping for the best". Thats a huge misconception there.

You made a point that Hendrix "listened to the sounds he loved and took it a step further". thats where you hit the truth..... and thats not at all like "throwing random colors together, spattering it on the canvas and hoping for the best" ........Hendrix was in control of what he was doing.

There are different ways of getting familiar with music, studying theory is one way.... not the only way..

It is possible to promote learning theory without spreading misconceptions about those that choose not to engage music in that way. You just have to be open minded and realize that there are many paths to success when it comes to art.

Quote by :-D


It is descriptive, yes. However, knowledge of music theory will allow you to write without limitations because you know why certain things work or don't work.




Theory is great, but the idea that it eliminates all limitations is a misconception.

there are always limitations.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Mar 31, 2008,
#33
I just want to say something, jimi hendrix was in no way a prodigy. IIRC, beethoven wasn't even a prodigy.
#34
listen to this > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TV74PsUo1dc

you will never be that man! no one will! saying that he didn't know advanced music theory doesn't = a reason not to learn music theory. in my mind, it's about 50% rythmic feel and 50% your knowledge of music. jimi just happened to be absolutely perfect with his rythmic feel, which made up for him not knowing alot of music theory. he could go straight from his mind and out the amplifier, just through his guitar.

learning music theory will NEVER hamper your ability as a musician. how can it hurt to know names for things your doing and how they actually work together? that being said, you can know all the theory in the world and still be a ****ty guitarist.
A fool is not one who makes a mistake, a fool is one who does not learn from it.
-me HAH!
#35
why spend so much time and money learning how to read difficult and annyoying notes when there's something called tabs. They only take about 15 minuets to learn to read and you learn scales and chords with it to. Also I can play much better than most people that have had music lessons and studied theory and been in band classes since there school days and they aren't so great at writing songs because theory taught them to play that sheet in front of there face. When you take that sheet away they are lost and desbicable. I got to thank you guys for being respictable to those that don't know theory and understanding that they can be great or even better than those that do know it because I got sick and tired of people that act all high and mighty and call others noobs and what not because they don't know the theory.For the record I don't know theory and i refuse to learn it because I fear that making my hobby and favorite past time and goal in life into A college class will make it very dull and gray.
#36
see i don't see the reason for the hostility towards theory. really, if you learn it you will get better, without a doubt. i had the same experience in band class in hating sheet music. but theory has made me a better guitar player no doubt about it.
A fool is not one who makes a mistake, a fool is one who does not learn from it.
-me HAH!
#37
why spend so much time and money learning how to read difficult and annyoying notes when there's something called tabs.


Presumably because some people want to communicate with other musicians and convey more information than "Ok...put this finger here"

They only take about 15 minuets to learn to read and you learn scales and chords with it to.


No, you learn shapes with it, not chords or scales. I find it hilarious that you'd admit to making use of scales and chords but refuse to learn how they're constructed.

Also I can play much better than most people that have had music lessons and studied theory and been in band classes since there school days and they aren't so great at writing songs because theory taught them to play that sheet in front of there face.


You have no idea what music theory is.

When you take that sheet away they are lost and desbicable.


That suggests a lack of knowledge on their part, not too much knowledge.

because I got sick and tired of people that act all high and mighty and call others noobs and what not because they don't know the theory.


We act "high and mighty" in response to anti-intellectualism, not ignorance. There is a difference between not knowing music theory, and refusing to educate yourself because you have no idea what music theory is.

For the record I don't know theory and i refuse to learn it because I fear that making my hobby and favorite past time and goal in life into A college class will make it very dull and gray.


Then you're a moron. This is the equivalent of a writer refusing to learn new words for fear of making his writing dull.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
Last edited by Archeo Avis at Apr 1, 2008,
#38
Its not that. Its because I don't want a class to suck all the fun out of my hobby and i may be a moron to people like you but to many others im an inspiration and provider of great Metal.
#39
Quote by bangoodcharlote
Listen to my sig: Shut and learn your theory, n00b!


hahaha

"There is no theory. You have only to listen. Pleasure is the law." - Claude Debussy.

Well people are taking the definition of THEORY to another level so the line got a little blurred.
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