#1
So I've decided to take my improvisation to a more jazzy level, and I'm having trouble understanding feels, such as double time, triplet, etc...

Any resources or advice on that?

Cheers
#3
Quote by guerito
get a metronome, start listening to a lot of jazz


Christ.

I'm not having trouble playing em, I just can't understand em.

If somebody gave me a chord progression and said play it at a whatever tempo at a whatever time feel I wouldn't know what to do.
#5
ummm... guerito is still correct. Understanding syncopation and getting a feel for swing through use of the metronome and most importantly listening to a bunch of jazz is THE way. No reason to patronize good advice.
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#6
Quote by ( o )===#
Christ.

I'm not having trouble playing em, I just can't understand em.

If somebody gave me a chord progression and said play it at a whatever tempo at a whatever time feel I wouldn't know what to do.


What the hell are you talking about? If you're having trouble playing them if somebody asks you to play them, then you're having trouble playing them. If you can't understand them, you'll have trouble playing them. I have no idea what you're saying.

And listening is infinitely helpful, take the advice.
#7
Quote by :-D
What the hell are you talking about? If you're having trouble playing them if somebody asks you to play them, then you're having trouble playing them. If you can't understand them, you'll have trouble playing them. I have no idea what you're saying.

And listening is infinitely helpful, take the advice.


Its like playing chords you dont know how to play. If someone asked me to play a G5, and I don't know that is (hypothetically), I can't play it.
Like if somebody asked me to improvise over something and it's in a triplet feel, I wouldn't know how to. Cause I dont know how to.
Maybe my post wasn't clear, but it's not that I can't, its that I dont know how.
#8
not trying to high jac the thread but I didnt want to make a new one.
Are triplets the same as playing in 3/4 over something in 4/4 or are they just notes in 3/4 accenting certain beats? Im sort of lost
#9
^Triplets are three notes in the space of two

So in 4/4 you have 8th notes
1 & 2 & 3 & 4 &

8th note triplets would be
1 trip let 2 trip let 3 trip let 4 trip let

Geddit?
My name is Andy
Quote by MudMartin
Only looking at music as math and theory, is like only looking at the love of your life as flesh and bone.

Swinging to the rhythm of the New World Order,
Counting bodies like sheep to the rhythm of the war drums
#10
Quote by ( o )===#
Maybe my post wasn't clear, but it's not that I can't, its that I dont know how.


Ok, I'm pretty stoned, and that just blew my mind (man).

How are those two things any different?
Quote by Ed O'Brien
“It’s not genius. It’s just that if you want something good to come out of something, you have to put in a lot of effort. That involves a lot of hard work, and a lot of blood, sweat and tears sometimes.”

http://urbanscarecrow.bandcamp.com/
#11
^Triplets are a different subdivision of the beat. Meaning that just as quarter notes subdivide the measure into 4 beats, quarter note triplets subdivide the measure into 6 beats. 8th notes subdivide the measure into 8 beats. 8th note triplets subdivide the measure into 12 beats. I hope that makes sense.

Playing in Triplet "Feel" is like playing with swung 8ths. Because every two 8th notes act as if they are an 8th note triplet and a quarter note triplet. Every mid-tempo jazz song ever, pretty much is played with a triplet feel so you should definitely get used to it.
A Shuffle Feel is like playing 12/8 over a 4/4 time. It's counted like 1-&-a 2-&-a 3-&-a 4-&-a. A lot of blues songs are done with this feel.
"Playing in 2" or something that like is like playing in 2/4 over a 4/4 time
Double Time is just playing at twice the tempo

I hope my information is helpful
#12
Quote by Damascus
Ok, I'm pretty stoned, and that just blew my mind (man).

How are those two things any different?


Why! Haven't you ever heard the phrase "you can do anything you set your mind to?"
Maybe the man is confident in his ability to learn about feels and play them, but he has only just begun to set his mind to it so he doesn't know how exactly yet.
That's the Victor Wooten approach to learning music, and it works wonders!
#13
Quote by Four-Sticks
Why! Haven't you ever heard the phrase "you can do anything you set your mind to?"
Maybe the man is confident in his ability to learn about feels and play them, but he has only just begun to set his mind to it so he doesn't know how exactly yet.
That's the Victor Wooten approach to learning music, and it works wonders!


But if he knows he'll eventually be able to do it, he just needs to know how to go about learning how to...but then he rejected stuff telling him to, didn't he? I've gone and confused myself again - I went through about three inner conversations just try to figure this swampmess of a post.
Quote by Ed O'Brien
“It’s not genius. It’s just that if you want something good to come out of something, you have to put in a lot of effort. That involves a lot of hard work, and a lot of blood, sweat and tears sometimes.”

http://urbanscarecrow.bandcamp.com/
#14
Quote by ( o )===#
If somebody gave me a chord progression and said play it at a whatever tempo at a whatever time feel I wouldn't know what to do.


Usually jazz people speak in generalities, like "Up", "Ballad", "Be-bop", and others to determine the speed. Ballads are slow, like anywhere from 60-100 bpm. "up" actually means really fast, like 160-210. "Fast Bop" is the same way. "bossa" and others like "latin" mean in straight 8ths, as in, not swung, and are usually anywhere from 110-160.

I'm sure you can feel swing time, just think jazz. Cut time is still swung but you usually count the 1st and 3rd beats as 1 and 2, so you are literally going twice as fast as you're counting. Some arrangements of "Body and Soul" have a ballad section and a cut-time swing section. I'll youtube the arrangement I'm talking about if you want, it's a really good example of a cut-time change.

Most jazz, anyhow, is felt heavily on 2 and 4 of counting. Think of "a-one *snap* a-two *snap* a one-two-three-go" type of thing. As corny as it sounds, it's a good way to start off a jazz start to get the feel you should have goin.

A good way to comp jazz progressions if it's just a guitar and lead instrument, and not much else, hit the bass note of the chord on 1 and 3, and the full chord on 2 and 4. This isn't a strict rule, but it's a good starting place for standard be-bop or medium-tempo'd jazz.