#1
Im so confused by this.

I hear for most rock songs, you should learn the pentatonic scale.

But then theres the pentaonic a major c e on and on..

Can some one explain this further and point me to a link that shows me the exact scale?
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#3
Or, help yourself out much more and learn the formulas behind the scale as they relate to the major scale:

Major pentatonic - 1 2 3 5 6
Minor pentatonic - 1 b3 4 5 b7.

Don't fall into the trap of thinking that scales are positions and boxes; they're specific groupings of notes.
#4
A Major Pentatonic
e-|--|2-|--|--|5-|--|7-|--|9-|--|--|12|--|14|--|--|17|--|19|--|21|--|--|24|
B-|--|2-|--|--|5-|--|7-|--|--|10|--|12|--|14|--|--|17|--|19|--|--|22|--|24|
G-|--|2-|--|4-|--|6-|--|--|9-|--|11|--|--|14|--|16|--|18|--|--|21|--|23|--|
D-|--|2-|--|4-|--|--|7-|--|9-|--|11|--|--|14|--|16|--|--|19|--|21|--|23|--|
A-|--|2-|--|4-|--|--|7-|--|9-|--|--|12|--|14|--|16|--|--|19|--|21|--|--|24|
E-|--|2-|--|--|5-|--|7-|--|9-|--|--|12|--|14|--|--|17|--|19|--|21|--|--|24|

if that is A major why does it start on the f# i thought what ever fret you started on thast what the key was. Like G pent scales starts on the G string
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#5
Quote by silly6-string
if that is A major why does it start on the f# i thought what ever fret you started on thast what the key was. Like G pent scales starts on the G string


This is exactly why I suggest to people to learn the scales themselves and not fingerings. The major pentatonic scale has scale degrees 1 2 3 5 6; in A major, this would be A B C# E F#. You can start on any of those notes, but as long as you play just those five, you're working in the A major pentatonic scale.
#6
So in pentatonic thing i looked at.

Whats the positions, because theres a whole fret board for A C D G etc..

So for pentatonic A first position I would play Open Low E then 3rd fret then Open A then 3rd fret.. etc?
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#8
this is really confusing me.

Most people play an open string before each string, is that.. something I should do?

Like open 3rd fret then open ( next string ) 3rd fret etc?
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#9
A lot of people work with "box shapes", like this form of A minor:

e---------------------------------5--8------------
B---------------------------5--8------------------
G---------------------5--7------------------------
D---------------5--7------------------------------
A---------5--7------------------------------------
E---5--8------------------------------------------

But like I said, you can play any combination of the notes in the pentatonic scale that you want regardless of the fret.
#10
So I could play on 3 strings the all the way down the fret ---> that way instead of a "box shape"
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#12
Sorry if im not getting it.
But tell me if I got this right.

A scale is a group of notes in a certain key. So the Minor Pentatonic scale would be a Group of notes in the key of lets say A.

So all the notes ( in that link ) on the Pentatonic A scale = 1 scale, am I right? and they break it up so its easier to learn? So I could instead play in position one, JUST the top 3 strings notes, then go down to position 3 and play the bottom 3 strings notes?

So A B C D E F G Pentatonic scales are all different scales in a whole?
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#13
Yes; the minor pentatonic scale (1 b3 4 5 b7) is a collection of specific notes; in A minor, that's A C D E G. If you play just those five notes anywhere on the fretboard, you'll be playing the A minor pentatonic scale. The lessons break them up into specific fingering patterns so that it's easier to memorize where some of the most accessible positions are.

And yes, if you're in A minor you can play those notes on the top 3 strings, provided you're playing just A C D E G. The same goes for the bottom three strings. The pentatonic scale has the same formulas for each scale. The major pentatonic will be built 1 2 3 5 6 and the minor pentatonic built 1 b3 4 5 b7. So all you have to do is take notes from each specific key and apply them to this formula to come up with the scale you need.
#14
I have a couple questions as well as someone just starting to learn scales.

I learned a pattern for (i think) minor pentatonic scales. Starting on the E string, you pick any note, and then play 2 notes per string with the distance being 1-4 1-3 1-3 1-3 1-4 1-4 (hopefully you know what i mean here).

But then I looked at http://ultimate-guitar.com/lessons/scales/minor_pentatonic_scales.html which shows 5 different patterns (the 2nd pattern there is the one I learned).

Does this mean that the pattern I learned is not movable anywhere on the fret board? How do you know where to use which pattern?
#15
That pattern contains the notes for F minor pentatonic, namely F Ab Bb C Eb. If you move it you're playing different notes so you're not playing F minor pentatonic anymore, you're playing something else.

Like D said, you need to learn the NOTES the scale contans and the pattern of INTERVALS that make up the scale. That way you can play the scale anywhere, but you have to learn the notes on the fretboard first. Scales are notes, therefore it follows that you're not going to be able to learn them until you know what the notes are and where they're located on the fretboard.

The positions or box patterns are actually pretty unimportant. They can help you navigate around the fretboard but they don't actually teach you anything about the scale. Besides, if you learn the notes of the scale and can locate them on the guitar then the patterns form themselves.
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Last edited by steven seagull at Apr 3, 2008,
#16
Quote by Aitrus
I have a couple questions as well as someone just starting to learn scales.

I learned a pattern for (i think) minor pentatonic scales. Starting on the E string, you pick any note, and then play 2 notes per string with the distance being 1-4 1-3 1-3 1-3 1-4 1-4 (hopefully you know what i mean here).

But then I looked at http://ultimate-guitar.com/lessons/scales/minor_pentatonic_scales.html which shows 5 different patterns (the 2nd pattern there is the one I learned).

Does this mean that the pattern I learned is not movable anywhere on the fret board? How do you know where to use which pattern?


The pattern you're showing starts on the root note of the scale and is movable. When you move it the scale key changes because you're starting on a different note (but the pattern stays the same).

The other patterns show ways to play the same scale in different places on the fretboard and starting on different notes.
Last edited by GoDrex at Apr 3, 2008,
#17
Quote by steven seagull
Like D said, you need to learn the NOTES the scale contans and the pattern of INTERVALS that make up the scale. That way you can play the scale anywhere, but you have to learn the notes on the fretboard first. Scales are notes, therefore it follows that you're not going to be able to learn them until you know what the notes are and where they're located on the fretboard.


I was hoping the "pattern" was a cheat way to get by until you know all the notes, but more and more I'm getting the impression that making use of music theory - including different scales etc - requires knowing the names of notes on the fretboard.

On the plus side I'm almost there for E and A strings since you need to know them for power chords, and high E is the same as low, so if I nail these down a bit better that's half the battle.
#18
The patterns on their own obviously make the right sounds, but without understanding what's going on you still can't use them effectively.

If I train you to say a phrase in French simply phoenetically, for example.

"Comment t'appelles-tu?" as "Komont tapell too"

You'll be able to speak that phrase, and people would understand it and respond. However, it doesn't mean you can speak French.
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#19
hehe, that makes me think of the Canadian national anthem. Most kids get taught some of the french verses at some point or another but have no clue what it means or how to write it down. They can still sing bilingually tho

I'll probably start reading some theory books (I've bought 1 already and have another in PDF) but I understand that learning notes on fretboard is equally important
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