#1
After reading a couple of threads, I noticed a guy said it was a mistake to practice only songs. You must also learn techniques... Say, if I was to only learn techniques and later utilize it on songs? Would that make a difference? (good or bad?)

And what techniques would I have to learn actually?

We're talking from beginner to advanced, and if someone could write up (only if you've got time or actually want to do it ) a sort of 'list' it would be highly appreciated (and bookmarked ;D).
#2
you should really practice both. you need to start learning skills and then apply them to songs that you like, so you can really get into them, and won't get bored.

from absolute beginner, start learning the frets, work on picking, learn plenty of chords. take it a little more advanced from there, alternate picking is probably the next thing to learn, followed by power chords, and from there it really starts molding around the type of music you listen to.

there are certain skills only used with certain types of music, but you might want to learn them anyway:

palm muting (used in a wide variety of music)
tremolo picking (used mostly in hard rock/metal)
tapping (used in a wide variety of music)
sweep picking (used mostly in metal)

hope this helped!
#3
Quote by afi22929
you should really practice both. you need to start learning skills and then apply them to songs that you like, so you can really get into them, and won't get bored.

from absolute beginner, start learning the frets, work on picking, learn plenty of chords. take it a little more advanced from there, alternate picking is probably the next thing to learn, followed by power chords, and from there it really starts molding around the type of music you listen to.

there are certain skills only used with certain types of music, but you might want to learn them anyway:

palm muting (used in a wide variety of music)
tremolo picking (used mostly in hard rock/metal)
tapping (used in a wide variety of music)
sweep picking (used mostly in metal)

hope this helped!

+1

Also learn hammer-ons and pull-offs. Also use scales to practice.
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#5
Quote by zKod
I should practice both scales and chords, right?


yeah
but it doesn't hurt to go over songs every now and again, especially if the song requires "a lot of teqnigue"
#6
Practice chords and scales! Can't tell you how much I'd wished I had started practicing those earlier..develop a warmup routine also. Everyone has their own way, but mine is to simply strum starting on the low E (6th string) on G (3rd fret) starting with the first finger playing single notes up the fretboard (3rd fret - first finger, 4th fret - second finger 5th fret - third finger, 6th fret -fourth finger, while staying in position)with every finger embarrassingly slow, playing for precison and not speed all the way down to the high E (1st string). Do that for a minute before you practice and see what happens.
Last edited by KingDev at Apr 1, 2008,