#1
I wish to know what techniques classical and fingerstyle guitarists use and how time consuming is it to learn them. I already know basically how to tap with both hands and finger pick (not saying I'm perfect, they definitely need work), I can even play pachebel's canon by trace bundy and I 'm learning dueling ninjas. I like guitarists like bundy a lot. I already know how to read music from playing violin, it's just a matter of me learning where the notes are oriented to the fretboard. I take guitar lessons, but not specifically classical or fingerstyle. I'm going to ask my teacher, but I'm not sure if he plays music like that. Is it possible to learn the techniques by myself?
#2
All you need are fingers.
Gibson SG Special Ebony
Epiphone Sheraton w/ Seymour Duncan JB and SH-1 '59
Fender 1985 Made in Japan Stratocaster
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#3
grow nails.. that0s the first one

the second... it's completely different way of holding the guitar when it comes to classical and the technique.. i suggest you ot go to music school or something.. just for one grade
Quote by Moggan13
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IIIIfb * KARKOLI * ytIIII(mostly rock... a little funky, a little hard just the way you want it )
#5
Pick up the Pumping Nylon book and DVD and give that a try first. Then if you don't get it get some lessons. Or give the book a little go and get lessons and do the book. Either way get the book, it teaches you so much.
Gibson SG Special Ebony
Epiphone Sheraton w/ Seymour Duncan JB and SH-1 '59
Fender 1985 Made in Japan Stratocaster
Ibanez S470 DXQM Charcoal Brown
Simon Patrick CW Spruce Top Acoustic
#6
The nails are for when fingerpicking, if gives much more volume and most think it gives a better sound. There are many different shapes you can use for the nails it is all just taste. The point of the nails is to have them shaped just right for the way you want them, not just as long as you can get them.

You should get a classical guitar, although not absolutely needed.

It is not 100% needed to get lessons either but it would more then likely be the best bet.

If you choose not to take lessons you can do what teamzaius said and get a book/dvd, I can't recommend any of those; I have never tried them.

"Is it possible to learn the techniques by myself?"

Yes, you can. I would study videos of experienced guitarists on youtube and whatnot to get the looks of the sitting position and the wrists and all. I am sure there is a site with more lessons and etc. Don't get too caught up in technique though, although good wrist positioning is important much of the other stuff does not have to be perfect.

Many guitarists get caught up in technique and all but I don't see the necessity of taking the time to perfect your technique.

"I wish to know what techniques classical and fingerstyle guitarists use and how time consuming is it to learn them. "

First, the time. You can put how ever much time you want into it. The more time you put the faster your progress and vise versa. It really varies for how much time you will need to learn the techniques because everyone learns at different paces.

Second, the techniques. Many of the techniques are similar to the other forms of guitar with slurs(hammer-ons/pull-offs/slides), legato(just a smooth flow of slurs), and Harmonics to name the ones I can think of right now.

I'm tired of typing right now, I will try and add more later if someone else who knows more then me(plenty of people otherwords) doesn't come and help you out.
#7
Quote by Nacho
Yes, you can. I would study videos of experienced guitarists on youtube and whatnot to get the looks of the sitting position and the wrists and all. I am sure there is a site with more lessons and etc. Don't get too caught up in technique though, although good wrist positioning is important much of the other stuff does not have to be perfect.

Many guitarists get caught up in technique and all but I don't see the necessity of taking the time to perfect your technique.


Well, the videos on the internet many times don't have the best angles to see the correct positioning so it's not the best idea.

good wrist positioning is just as important as all other things relevant to technique. If you have bad technique you won't be able to play as well as you want to and will be limited to repertoire that fits your technique.

I take the time in doing technique because I want to play the pieces I learn perfectly, which I wouldn't be able to do without technique.

This is from a classical guitar point of view where technique is essential. In fingerpicking it's less strict but there are still some general guidelines one follows.
#8
Technique is important but you can make the notes ring just as well while maintaining less of a technical quality you are talking about. You can put just as much emotion and everything else. Don't get me wrong technique is very very important but people who go crazy over it need to cool done on it.

But, this is all a matter of taste.