#1
so this question has been erking me for some time. I am pretty familiar with the fretboard, I know a hell of a lot of chords, I have good timing, good tone, but I can't figure out one pretty specific thing. Take a song such as Sultans of Swing, I figured out how to play it by ear. Seemed very straightforward, one accidental, Bb. Ok so that seems like it would be in F major but I have seen people call it as Dminor or based on Mixolydian mode. Now, they all have the same notes, and I realize I have to learn the huge difference between modes and scales, but I have no clue how one would tell if you're playing in F, Dminor or in a mixolydian mode. If they have the exact same notes how can you tell. I've caught on that 99.9% of rock solos are in a minor key, I can play them, but what the hell makes it minor? (I can figure it out when it's not a 7 note scale they use, but if they do use 7 notes I have no clue how to tell) How can you tell which it is? I've tried to learn everything by ear and just brute forcing out music, but I've put my foot down and I am determined to figure this theory stuff out.
Last edited by farcry at Apr 2, 2008,
#2
thats good theory is the best, for the keys that sound the same, its a prefrences if they have the same notes in it,

But to figure out if it is a minor scale, simple the flat three of the scale makes it a minor,
#3
Learn how to figure out major/minor tonality before delving into modes. It's all about where the progression resolves if it's a key-based piece. F major and D minor have the same key signatures, but if the progressions lean toward D minor instead of F major then it's likely your playing in D minor. Studying the first chord, as well as a piece's cadences, will help.

Quote by Martindecorum
But to figure out if it is a minor scale, simple the flat three of the scale makes it a minor,

No, relative to the major scale a minor scale contains 1 2 b3 4 5 b6 b7, not just a b3.
#4
well all the modes are just the major scale played from different positions, what matters is the order you play the notes and where the semitones occur in the scale, this gives a scale its flavour and its major or minor sound
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#6
Basically, the easiest way to pick up on a minor key is the sound. A song in a major key sounds like its in a major key. But that doesn't mean its happy - (real **** example, but hey) James Blunt's "Goodbye My Lover" is in a major key.

Anyway, the notes that affect the scale are the 3rd, 6th, and 7th. The rest of the notes are the same within your major and minor scales. Very few popular songs are modal, with the exception of Mixolydian (minor 7th in major scale). Just practice listening to songs, and see if you can pick the key. Determining whether its D minor or F major should be easy to do by ear - and Sultans of Swing is in D minor.
#7
Quote by druz15_UG
well all the modes are just the major scale played from different positions, what matters is the order you play the notes and where the semitones occur in the scale, this gives a scale its flavour and its major or minor sound


Scales are not positions, and the order of the notes is irrelevant.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#8
so what's stairway to heaven in C or Aminor, been a while since I've looked at it, but I'm pretty it's one of those two. Or do they ever, like play a main part of a song in C and then switch to Aminor for the solo. Usually when I play, my brain tells my hands where to go and sound comes out, and I kind of just watch like an innocent bystander just seeing what happens.
#10
Quote by Martindecorum
c and am are the same


No, they aren't.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#12
Quote by Martindecorum
there all natural notes


Yes, so?
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#14
Quote by Martindecorum
then can u explain what makes them different plz


The intervals, the chords, the tonal center, and the application. Everything.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#15
Quote by Martindecorum
then can u explain what makes them different plz


heyo, this is exactly what I made the thread for, to figure that out, even though they are the exact same notes, what the heck makes them different. I think the ending chord progression goes Aminor, Gmajor, Fmajor. So from that alone can you tell that it's in the key of Am and not C.

Archeo, it's not like I don't understand those terms just fine, but what about the intervals and the tonal centre specifically makes that song in Aminor. Just telling us what it is, without explaining is confusing as hell. It's like asking someone to teach you to swim, and they are like, "kick your legs, swing your arms around and float, it's easy".
Last edited by farcry at Apr 2, 2008,