#1
This isn't something that is particularly well covered in internet lessons and books. They just tell you to learn a chord. Strum it once per bar, then faster, then they just say then with upstrokes.

The problem is, I'm finding this tricky. It sends my hands all over the place. Secondly, what about chords where you don't hit all strings, like A and even more so D. How on earth do you get a good up and down strumming action on the D chord for instance, only catching the bottom four strings on the way up?
#2
practice practice practice, my friend. you have to be very thoughtful of all of your movements while playing. observe, analyze and change what you're doing accordingly in order to get better.
#3
practice, your strum pattern will begin to develop, after you've been playing awhile your right hand gets a good feel for the strings, and you will instinctively be able to stop your strum on the desired place.
#5
The other thing is, the upstrokes seem to push the pick round in my hand. I just switched to a lighter nylon pick with a grip, and its a bit better. Maybe I'm just not holding it hard enough!
#6
When I started using upstrokes I didn't worry so much about not hitting certain strings, I just focused on getting the strumming down, and it sounded fine. Now that I've been doing it for a while upstrokes seem as natural as downstrokes and I have more accuracy too. So basically, practice.
#7
slow at first slow as you need and practice all it comes down too
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#8
Quote by Kevin T
Secondly, what about chords where you don't hit all strings, like A and even more so D. How on earth do you get a good up and down strumming action on the D chord for instance, only catching the bottom four strings on the way up?

Can't you just use your fretting hand thumb to mute those strings?
#9
Is this how must people would go about playing? It never quite mutes it completely though, does it?
#10
Actually I've found by not hunching over to actually look at the strings as your strumming, but instead sit upright and look straight ahead, I can strum much more fluidly both up and down and actually pretty much hit the right amount of strings for each chord, just glancing down briefly at my left hand to change chords