#1
I have two extra spaces on my rack and I dunno what to get... so far i thought of getting a BBE sonic maximizer and a dbx 266xl compressor... you guys have any other ideas? im not looking much for effects but mainly for sound.

Thanks
#2
I'd recommend the dbx compressor. I used one awhile back and liked it... I'm looking to get another one soon. It is a compressor, so it isn't going to be "wowing"... but it is very subtle and well worth having.

But I'd be cautious about the Sonic Maximizer. You will love it at first... but after awhile, you will never use it. It had a nice novelty, but you may get tired of it. Really, all it is, is a fancy EQ that boosts your lows and upper highs (although, it is a lot more complicated than that). You may actually like the effect for your sound. But personally, I felt like the addition of the lows and all really ruined the tone (especially with recording). I personally think this unit is better suited in like a home entertainment rack kind of thing lol

Well, I'm out of class now... so I got to go. lol
#3
So the DBX would be good and it wont take away from the lead channel?

what other Ideas do you have for the extra space?
#5
Do you have a power conditioner?

One of those is always nice to have, never know when lightning strikes.
WTLTL 2011
#6
yeah so far I have a power conditioner and a tuner, I was gonna put my wireless on the rack but it would be much simpler to be on the pedal board
#7
What equipment do you already have?

I like dbx... for the price, I feel they are the best you can get it. (if you want, THE BEST, get out your checkbook and prepare to drop $2,000++ lol). But really... they are relatively cheap (only a couple hundred or so) and do a good job at compression.

I usually used my compressor for several things... (1) for recording, for obvious reasons, (2) the model I was using had a built in gate; it was nice to set the thing to cut the signal at -30db, etc), and (3) it does have a subtle effect on your sustain, and helps to 'even' it out. If you are not familiar with the effects of a compressor, I would highly recommend trying to mess with one for several hours. (more than likely, you will not be initially impressed; a compressor is more of a tool, not so much of an effect).

I can give you other equipment recommendations when I get an idea of what you already got.
#8
here's what I have:

GUITARS:
Jackson Dinky
Dean V

PEDALBOARD:
AKG Wireless Bug
Ibanez Tube Screamer
Boss CE2 Chorus(will be getting)
EQ pedal(Might Get)
Boss Noise Suppressor
5150 II Pedal

RACK:
Gator 4 Space Rack Case
Korg rackmount tuner
Monster Pro 900 Power Center

AMP:
5150 II Head
Marshall 1960A Cab

I think thats it
Last edited by miggyi at Apr 3, 2008,
#9
thats a cheap compressor...probably harming your signal more than helping it.....

but I suggest a rack tuner and EQ

IMO, if you are getting rack gear, you should save up for at least the middle of the line gear...around $500+

If you sing or have a singer in the band, the TC Helicon VoiceWorks Vocal Processor will be much better in place of the tuner...It's a must have. I'm saving up for one now.

some samples:
http://www.youtube.com/profile_videos?user=tchelicon
Last edited by moody07747 at Apr 3, 2008,
#10
If your super mega rich: Eventide Harmonizer.
2004 Fender American HSS Strat
Hughes And Kettner Switchblade
Schecter C-1 Hellraiser FR
Epi LP Classic
Epi G-400
Yamaha acoustic
Boss DD-3 Delay
B.Y.O.C. MXR Distortion+
Vox Wah
Ibanez TS9 Tube Screamer
#13
I have a power center! please read before you post... and im not looking for effects.
#14
what is the power center powering? only the tuner?
Gibson Explorer
Jackson Soloist SL3
Orange Tiny Terror
Mesa 2x12
#15
Quote by elchico04
what is the power center powering? only the tuner?

well yeah, at the moment thats the only thing is powering...but im looking for more ideas on what to get for my rack
#16
Do you want fancy modulation, delays and verbs? A G-Major or a G-Sharp is a nice addition to any rack

I have a G-Major left over from when I used a total rack setup, it's the only thing out of it I still use, it's amazingly good.
Fender 60W Super-Sonic Head
Fender 2x12 Cabinet (Vintage 30s)
TC Electronics G Major
Boss Blues Driver BD-2 w/ Keeley mod
MXR 6 Band EQ
BB Preamp
TS-9
Jim Dunlop Crybaby Wah

American Fender Stratocaster
#17
people need to learn how to read, i swear all the illiterate kids come on UG lol im joking guys, i would suggest a compresser but a more decent one obviously, if you want a sonic maximizer, get the higher end ones beucase it does more than what the guy had mentioned above.
#18
Quote by convictionless
people need to learn how to read, i swear all the illiterate kids come on UG

This.
#19
Quote by moody07747
+1

The Eventide H8000FW is an amazing unit.

Oh god I know. Maybe one day I can win the lottery or inherit a lot of money so I can afford one.
2004 Fender American HSS Strat
Hughes And Kettner Switchblade
Schecter C-1 Hellraiser FR
Epi LP Classic
Epi G-400
Yamaha acoustic
Boss DD-3 Delay
B.Y.O.C. MXR Distortion+
Vox Wah
Ibanez TS9 Tube Screamer
#20
1. Rack-mount EQ
2. G•Major
.
American HM Strat | LP Studio
Soldano Avenger w/DeYoung OT | Mark IV rackmount | DC-3 rackmount | Single-Recto

.
#21
anybody have some good advice that I can actually use? I need ideas and info.
#22
Given your current equipment... it looks like you only have room for two rack items (if they are single). Thus, I would say you would most want a compressor and an EQ.

Now I am going to address some of the other replies to this thread... I love rack equipment, and I've worked with a lot of pieces that range from amateur to studio quality; so I am telling you what I know...

...Compressor...
For a smaller budget (where you do not want to spend thousands)... dbx is a great company for compressors. dbx is not "the best" compressor; as I noted before! If you want a quality-grade studio compressor, you need to spend $2,000+. Anything above the dbx and below that studio-level, is just a waste of your money; there is no significant difference!

The model you noted, the 266xl, is an OK model. You are likely only going to run one channel... so I would recommend looking into the 160A. It is a little more money, but the circuitry in the 160A is a little better (but the 266xl is not bad; you may not even notice a difference). If you are going to purchase rack equipment, I'd highly recommend Sweetwater; never had a problem with them before.
266xl - http://www.sweetwater.com/store/detail/266XL/
160A - http://www.sweetwater.com/store/detail/160A/

If you need more than 1 channel; the 1046 is akin to the 160A... but with a total of 4 channels... http://www.sweetwater.com/store/detail/1046/

There are other compressors out there, obviously... but for the money, I would personally use dbx... I know I can trust them cause I've used them before. Now... if you have like $500 total, I would shoot for the 266xl and spend the remainder on an EQ. But if you have the money to drop ~$500 on the compressor alone, the 160A is a great option.


...Sonic Maximizer...

This item belongs to a class of products referred to as "exciters" or "enhancers"... they basically are intended to "enhance" your sound. A way to think of it is, if you run a signal through one, and the item is off... you get a sound (good, bad, etc)... but when you turn it on, your sound gets "beefier", "heavier", etc. The way it does this is with extremely complex algorithms that adjust the signal (your sound). You can, literally, sum up the effect as adding/enhancing the low signal range and adding/enhancing the upper-high signal range (I think it is in the 10/12kHz+ area), as well as adjusting for phase. As noted, it is more complicated than that; but that is a good gist to describe it.

The BBE will make you sound "beefier". And it has gained a lot of popularity among guitarists for its quick on/off "beef-i-ness". You can run a pretty crappy tone through this thing, and it will, more than likely, sound reasonably better coming out. This is why I encouraged you to try it yourself; to see if you truly like what it does.

Personally, I don't like it. I find it has a novelty at first, that soon wears off (but that's me). I like to control my tone with my amp's controls; if the sound isn't quite beefy/clear/nice enough for me, I adjust them. I don't reach to a BBE and flip the 'on' switch. The BBE has its place, and you may find it adds that something extra to your tone that you love; great! That is what it is all about! (But you should know the intent of the item is "brighten" up recording mixes for playback; ie, the recording/mixing/etc process. But... I will also note that anyone who really knows what they're doing in a studio knows the BBE is a crappy quick-fix; but if you are using it for your guitar tone, then try it and see if you like it!)

...Graphical EQ...

You are running a simple guitar rig... so I'd recommend a reliable graphical EQ! For more a studio environment, I would more likely recommend a parametric as well as a graphical; but for a simple rack hooked up to your amp, a graphical EQ is much easier to use and understand.

All in all, for a basic rack, you can't go too wrong with a rack mount EQ. They are all fairly reasonable/reliable for the most part. It largely comes down to what features you want. Some EQ systems have built in noise-reduction, feedback control, etc. Some are basic graphic EQs with knobs you move up and down. Some are digital, that can save "preset" EQ settings (nice to have; especially for live shows, you can switch your EQ to something you know very quickly, song to song; etc). And more. I'd recommend just browsing through here (link below) and see what they offer:

http://www.sweetwater.com/c788--Graphic_EQ/popular/pn2

Most of those EQs (above) are geared more towards some level of studio use. So there are a number of EQs with 4 channels, 8 channels, etc. You will want to make note of ones that are either one channel or 2 channel. (you could get an 8 channel; but you would likely be paying more for those other channels, which you would never use). Below are some EQs from the above list you might be more interested in (cause they are 1 to 2 channels)...

http://www.sweetwater.com/store/detail/131/
Another DBX product. Good simple single channel.

http://www.sweetwater.com/store/detail/231/
Basically a duplicate of the above; but with 2 channels.

http://www.sweetwater.com/store/detail/DEQ230/
2 channel, programmable /w presets EQ. I liked this one; but broke one in the past dropping it off several flights of stairs.

http://www.sweetwater.com/store/detail/DEQ60/
This one is a 2 channel. A little more pricey; but it is nice. Has a nice feature dealing with the "Q" of an equalizer (it is a parameter of how it shapes the octaves and such).

http://www.sweetwater.com/store/detail/Q2031B/
Another pretty decent dual.


Well... I'm going to lunch. Good luck!
#23
since the DBX is a noise gate should I still use my noise suppressor pedal?
#25
Quote by miggyi
here's what I have:

GUITARS:
Jackson Dinky
Dean V

PEDALBOARD:
AKG Wireless Bug
Ibanez Tube Screamer
Boss CE2 Chorus(will be getting)
EQ pedal(Might Get)
Boss Noise Suppressor
5150 II Pedal

RACK:
Gator 4 Space Rack Case
Korg rackmount tuner
Monster Pro 900 Power Center

AMP:
5150 II Head
Marshall 1960A Cab

I think thats it

Why would you even bother having a rack if all you have in it is a tuner and you can't think of anything else? I'd ditch the pedalboard and get an eventide eclipse or g force, or maybe g system.

Also just my 2c on a couple suggestions:
EQ: waste of time. Those rackmount eqs are made for sound engineers to fix problems with the room and such. You will encounter three problems:
a) you will have no idea what the frequencies do and thus will resort to doing smiley/frown shaped curves, for which you may as well just have 1 knob on your amp.
b) from your position from in front of your amp, you will not be able to realize the full potential of the eq, which is finding the place in the mix and adjusting for room conditions.
c) if you do manage to achieve anything, your engineer will undo your hard work by applying his own eq when putting it through the pa.

COMPRESSOR: distortion naturally compresses your tone so adding any more will squash any life out of it. For clean I personally enjoy the dynamics of an uncompressed tone but even if you want a more compressed sound I wouldn't bother in an expensive rack unit.

BBE: Haven't tried it but personally it seems kinda tweaky and useless. If your rig sounds good then why bother. If it sounds crap then get a new rig.

Overall I think your more pertinent question is 'why the **** do I have a rack' and 'do I really need one?' It seems you are looking more at buying new pedals rather than new rack units, so I would personally advise your to sell your rack and use the money to buy something else.

"A wise man once said, never discuss philosophy or politics in a disco environment." - Frank Zappa
Quote by Jinskee
Don't question the X.
<Frenchy> I'm such a failure
#26
Quote by xifr
Why would you even bother having a rack if all you have in it is a tuner and you can't think of anything else? I'd ditch the pedalboard and get an eventide eclipse or g force, or maybe g system.

Also just my 2c on a couple suggestions:
EQ: waste of time. Those rackmount eqs are made for sound engineers to fix problems with the room and such. You will encounter three problems:
a) you will have no idea what the frequencies do and thus will resort to doing smiley/frown shaped curves, for which you may as well just have 1 knob on your amp.
b) from your position from in front of your amp, you will not be able to realize the full potential of the eq, which is finding the place in the mix and adjusting for room conditions.
c) if you do manage to achieve anything, your engineer will undo your hard work by applying his own eq when putting it through the pa.

COMPRESSOR: distortion naturally compresses your tone so adding any more will squash any life out of it. For clean I personally enjoy the dynamics of an uncompressed tone but even if you want a more compressed sound I wouldn't bother in an expensive rack unit.

BBE: Haven't tried it but personally it seems kinda tweaky and useless. If your rig sounds good then why bother. If it sounds crap then get a new rig.

Overall I think your more pertinent question is 'why the **** do I have a rack' and 'do I really need one?' It seems you are looking more at buying new pedals rather than new rack units, so I would personally advise your to sell your rack and use the money to buy something else.


No that is not what I asked, if you look back you will see what I actually asked... I want to use my rack cause 1. I have it 2. It could enhance my rig.
#27
Quote by xifr

Also just my 2c on a couple suggestions:
EQ: waste of time. Those rackmount eqs are made for sound engineers to fix problems with the room and such. You will encounter three problems:
a) you will have no idea what the frequencies do and thus will resort to doing smiley/frown shaped curves, for which you may as well just have 1 knob on your amp.
b) from your position from in front of your amp, you will not be able to realize the full potential of the eq, which is finding the place in the mix and adjusting for room conditions.
c) if you do manage to achieve anything, your engineer will undo your hard work by applying his own eq when putting it through the pa.


While this is generally true, what I would do (and will when I have the money) is buy a dual channel EQ with less bands on each channel to go with the two channels on my amplifier. Then It's like having two 15 band EQ pedals, which is not overly difficult to fine tune. Clicky

Quote by xifr

COMPRESSOR: distortion naturally compresses your tone so adding any more will squash any life out of it. For clean I personally enjoy the dynamics of an uncompressed tone but even if you want a more compressed sound I wouldn't bother in an expensive rack unit.


+1, even if you are a fan of compressed cleans (I do use them on occasion) I wouldn't use them live, and even if I did I'd probably just buy a decent compressor PEDAL, like the MXR Dyna Comp.
Quote by xifr

BBE: Haven't tried it but personally it seems kinda tweaky and useless. If your rig sounds good then why bother. If it sounds crap then get a new rig.


If your rig sounds good, this makes it sound better. If your rig sounds bad, it makes it worse. All the reviews that say "It brought my MG back to life" are probably still in their gear honeymoon. That said, again, it doesn't need to be a rack unit. They actually do a sonic stomp box now for guitarists' use.
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