#2
^ well it depends. if you've got a GOOD HIGH QUALITY DEMO then you get it out to radio stations and use it as a "resume" for getting gigs. also a good well produced demo can be useful in getting fans and such on myspace. depending on the quality and quantity of songs on the demo you can also get it copywritten and start selling it (i don't think you HAVE to have it copywritten to sell it, but i wouldn't do it without copywriting it)

i wouldn't consider selling it until you have at LEAST 6 songs but i'd honestly angle for 8 or more songs (you want your fans to feel like they're getting a good deal and nobody wants to pay $5 - $10 for 6 songs from a "not yet famous" band) also if you have a decent amount of songs digital distribution seems to be getting more and more popular (once i get my next cd recorded thats the route im going, free listening on UG but if you want to listen in the car you gotta download it, but imma make it as cheap as possible)
#3
Promoters, small record companies (bigger ones if you think you're band is up to scratch), the public...

Put it everywhere you can afford to.
#4


Okay, first thing would be to make a good pack

A pack should contain:

1. A well recorded, but not over produced, demo of 3-4 of your absolute BEST tracks
2. A photo of your band
3. A small biography (About half A4 page) detailing ages, how long the band have been playing, any media quotes, and a little about what venues you've played (Although don't make yourselves seem too impressive, or small venue owners will be intimidated)
4. At least 3 ways to contact whoever deals with venue owners in your band (Phone number, E-mail address, mobile, address)

Next, put get a few packs made up, and send them out to venue owners, gig promoters, indie labels, etc.

PROTIP: Phone the venue up before you send in the pack, ask in your most polite voice "Hi there. I'm a member of *band* and we'd love to play your venue. Would it be okay to send you a pack with a few demo songs?". This will make the person on the other side of the phone thikn "Oh, what a polite fellow. I'll certainly keep an eye out for their package". And if you don't hear anything back, call them up and ask them politely if they've recieved it, so they have to sift through the incredible amount of packs they get weekly to find yours, and put it to the top

My band have been doing this for about a year and a half now, and sending them out to every venue within a 10 mile radius of our hometown, and we get a fair amount of gigs (usually about 7-8 a month).

Hope this helps, any other questions, drop us a message =]
#5
Quote by vigenharutyunya
Ok imagine iv'e got recorded a demo for my band... hmm what shall i do next??
or what shall i do with my demo??

any good venues??? any cool sites??....

hmm links if possible and thanx


What are your goals?

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#8
Quote by FuzzyBear
i think its all pretty much been said, basically get that bad boy on myspace, pimp it out to the max and start getting some gigs on the go, build a little following, then its back to the drawing board for the next cd

Agreed.
Once you have enough tracks recorded to call it an album, you can also make your own copies onto CD, (as long as it's pretty decent quality) design a nice cover for it, and make your own albums at a production cost of around £1 each, then sell them at gigs for easily 3 or 4 times that amount.
You can do the same with t-shirts too.
#9
Quote by FuzzyBear
i think its all pretty much been said, basically get that bad boy on myspace, pimp it out to the max and start getting some gigs on the go, build a little following, then its back to the drawing board for the next cd
If you are trying to sell your demo, make your headline "New Demo Availible" or you name "bandname(new songs!).

I have seen that, listened to a couple songs and liked them, and ordered a copy of the demo from the band.
*-)
Quote by Bob_Sacamano
i kinda wish we all had a penis and vagina instead of buttholes

i mean no offense to buttholes and poop or anything

Rest in Peace, Troy Davis and Trayvon Martin and Jordan Davis and Eric Garner and Mike Brown
#11
noones going to rip you off

if youve burned copies of your music and have file creation dates on electronic files theres not gonna be a problem

if your really paranoid burn a cd, stick it in a sealed envelope then send it to yourself registered post and keep the sealed package as proof
#12
If you want to make some pretty high-quaility DIY demos check out getting a Lightscribe CD Burner

You can get them of newegg.com for like $30.
And maybe we can fly away from here, surf on the debris of a broken scene...
#14
Quote by FuzzyBear
noones going to rip you off

if youve burned copies of your music and have file creation dates on electronic files theres not gonna be a problem


No. All you need to do is change the date and time on your computer before you burn your files.

"Hey, look! I made this in 1981!"

"Uh.... how's that? You weren't born until '88!"

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#16
Quote by vigenharutyunya
hmm my DVD writer got lightscribe function but i don have anyprog to use it



Most LS drives come with a program, but if yours didn't you can probably find one online for free. If not, Samsung makes some pretty high-quality units for like $30.

Take the LS and it's discs and as long good printer you can buy some photo paper, jewel cases and some shrink wrap with a hair dryer and you can pump out some pretty quality DIY discs for next to nothing.

Takes some time and effort but I think it's worth it. You give people a burnt CD with sharpie on it in a thin jewel case or a paper slip 90% of them will junk it or never listen to it. You give someone a shrink-wrapped disc in a jewel case you have a much higher chance of them taking it home and giving it a listen. Couple that with a good live show and voila, you've (hopefully) got a new fan!

Not to mention many small venues will want a demo before they'll book you. You hand them something quality they'll take you alot more seriously right off the bat.
And maybe we can fly away from here, surf on the debris of a broken scene...