#1
Alright so I hear everyone talking about the action on there guitar. WTF is this all about? I think its tightening the screws or loosening them around the bridge to raise string hieght, but what does that do?
Thanks in advance
That's the jizz
#2
Action refers to string height from the frets, usually measured at the 12th fret. Low action means you dont have to push strings down far. It is adjusted either at the bridge or using the truss rod.
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#3
That's exactly it.... string height.

Low action means lower strings, closer to the fretboard, while higher action is higher strings, with more space between fretboard and strings.

Truss-rod adjustments are done to provide the correct amount of bow or relief in the neck, action is adjusted by the saddles/bridge.

You shouldn't be using the truss-rod to adjust string action.
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Last edited by Hakael at Apr 2, 2008,
#4
yeah its just string hight...
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#5
depends on your style of playing higher action is better for blues, while low action is good for rock just have to find the perfect balance
#7
Quote by Hakael
That's exactly it.... string height.

Low action means lower strings, closer to the fretboard, while higher action is higher strings, with more space between fretboard and strings.

Truss-rod adjustments are done to provide the correct amount of bow or relief in the neck, action is adjusted by the saddles/bridge.

You shouldn't be using the truss-rod to adjust string action.


You should definitely use it if it is appropriate AND you know what you're doing. It could very well be that the guitar needs the adjustment if the neck is bowed in either direction and it could lower/raise the action considerably (especially around the 12th fret). I've had it done in conjunction with all saddle adjustments. On every guitar it was slightly off.
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#8
Quote by tasty licks
You should definitely use it if it is appropriate AND you know what you're doing. It could very well be that the guitar needs the adjustment if the neck is bowed in either direction and it could lower/raise the action considerably (especially around the 12th fret). I've had it done in conjunction with all saddle adjustments. On every guitar it was slightly off.


If the neck either has too much relief or is bowed back, then yes, truss-rod adjustment would be needed, but that should be the only reason to do so.

You fret the 1st and 15th fret (where the neck meets the body). At the 6th fret, the string height should be approximately the thickness of a credit card. After that, action is adjusted via the saddles/bridge. If you're raising the action too high and still getting fret buzz, that's an indication of other issues, such as uneven frets, or even possibly neck warping.
~We Rock Out With Our Cocks Out!: UG Naked Club.~
Once in a blue moon, God reaches down from his lofty perch, points at an infant boy and proclaims, "This one shall have balls carved out of fucking granite."
#9
If you're a beginner, don't touch anything.

Let someone who knows what they're doing adjust your guitar unless you want to risk permanently damaging your equipment.
#10
Hakael, wise advice, we're in agreeance.

but I think the threadstarter would benefit from this best:

Quote by Silent Potato
If you're a beginner, don't touch anything.

Let someone who knows what they're doing adjust your guitar unless you want to risk permanently damaging your equipment.
I love my...

Parker Nitefly Mojo - custom
Schecter 006 Hellraiser
Ibanez S470QS

Mesa / Boogie F-50
Vox AD50VT

Seagull Artist Studio cutaway I-beam

Ibanez ATK700
Ibanez Soundwave 35
#11
Quote by tasty licks
Hakael, wise advice, we're in agreeance.

but I think the threadstarter would benefit from this best:


Agreed.

A little truss-rod adjustment can go a long way, and done wrong can easily break a neck.
~We Rock Out With Our Cocks Out!: UG Naked Club.~
Once in a blue moon, God reaches down from his lofty perch, points at an infant boy and proclaims, "This one shall have balls carved out of fucking granite."
#12
hey,

i bought a cheap epiphone les paul special II awhile ago to practice set ups on. So far I have learned a lot. I am having one problem though. At the 12th fret, my string height is about 7/64 and that is with the bridge lowered the whole way down. I have the neck straight and I would like to get alittle lower. What can I do next?

Thanks,
Justin
#13
Slip a shim under the neck ?
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#14
I've got the action around 3/64" at the 12th fret by putting a tiny piece of cardboard under the base of the bolt on neck (a shim). After that I just adjusted the bridge and truss rod until I got the lowest possible action without buzzing through the amp. In my experience (which is limited) buzzing is ok as long as you can't hear it through the amp.