#1
or are they the same thing, I use a Line 6 Uber Metal pedal, and run it through a Line 6 Spider Valve HD 100 Head and a B-52 4x12. I'm wanting distortion that will make my pinch harmonics reallly come out, I play mostly metalcore. I use a Gibson SG Faded and usually play on the rhythm setting. So idunno whether to get a new pedal, or what and if somebody could explain to me the difference between over drive and gain that'll help, maybe suggest a pedal for what im describing.
Last edited by sleepytones at Apr 3, 2008,
#2
I am not sure. but I always thought gain was sort of an effect added, and overdrive is an effect naturally created..
Quote by RetroGunslinger
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#3
This is quite the ambiguous question. I honestly don't think these are two definitions that can be accurately compared "pros and cons" style.

In a simplified form, Gain is what it says - a relative increase or amplification in a signal being fed into a source in realtion to its original level. Its common usage in the guitar amp world is similar yet different. You could ask 10 different people and get 10 different answers. The truth would be an amalgam of all 10 of those answers.

As it would take pages of explanation and seeing as I am not the expert to explain it I will leave this open to other posters. Just understand that these terms mean different things to different people.

Good luck,

Greg
Fender 60th Anniv MIM Strat (SD Little 59er Br)
Agile AL-2000 Rootbeer Flame (GFS Vtg '59)
Fender Hot Rod Deluxe
GFS Chorus
DS-1
#4
So it wouldnt matter if I purchase an overdrive pedal, or use the overdrive setting on my amp, then just using a regular distortion pedal, and not using the overdrive setting? Seems overdrive has more mids that come out and thats it, just wondering, ive tried to tweek the sound i want out of it, but cant seem to. for pinch harmonics
#5
Gain is the amount of distortion(signal clipping) added to the signal. Overdrive is just a form of distortion, its a mild form mostly used to over drive the tubes of a tube amp to get a nice tube amp crunch.

For pinch I would probably stick to the treble pickup.
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#6
Quote by Malarkatron
Gain is the amount of distortion(signal clipping) added to the signal. Overdrive is just a form of distortion, its a mild form mostly used to over drive the tubes of a tube amp to get a nice tube amp crunch.

For pinch I would probably stick to the treble pickup.



hey thanks i will do that from now on, i just didnt like the thin sound that came from the treble setting, i like a full warm tone to my guitar but wanted to pinch harmonic to really come out at the same time, but i will start doing that
#7
I really don't want you to get an over-simplified opinion from these responses so I will try to add as much as I can to help you out.

In terms of how OD and gain function in an amplifier - they are the same with one crucial difference. Overdrive is "soft clipping", Distortion is "hard-clipping" Further adding to the confusion is that one has "even-order harmonics", the other had "odd-order harmonics" You can already see that this is really not an easy topic to explain.

TECHNICALLY, overdrive and distortion pedals SIMULATE these goings-on in a tube amplifier. They emulate these sounds. If they happen to push said tube amp further into overdrive this is a SECONDARY result. The common and incorrect belief is that Distortion pedals produce an artificial sound and Overdrive pedals are mainly for "overdriving" a tube amp. This is mostly incorrect. Both emulate their respective sounds. Both are also great additions to a guitarists setup.

Sorry to make this so confusing, but I don't want you to get the idea that this is a simple topic that anyone can give you a one or two line straight answer to.

-Greg
Fender 60th Anniv MIM Strat (SD Little 59er Br)
Agile AL-2000 Rootbeer Flame (GFS Vtg '59)
Fender Hot Rod Deluxe
GFS Chorus
DS-1
#8
Quote by greenwgreg
I really don't want you to get an over-simplified opinion from these responses so I will try to add as much as I can to help you out.

In terms of how OD and gain function in an amplifier - they are the same with one crucial difference. Overdrive is "soft clipping", Distortion is "hard-clipping" Further adding to the confusion is that one has "even-order harmonics", the other had "odd-order harmonics" You can already see that this is really not an easy topic to explain.

TECHNICALLY, overdrive and distortion pedals SIMULATE these goings-on in a tube amplifier. They emulate these sounds. If they happen to push said tube amp further into overdrive this is a SECONDARY result. The common and incorrect belief is that Distortion pedals produce an artificial sound and Overdrive pedals are mainly for "overdriving" a tube amp. This is mostly incorrect. Both emulate their respective sounds. Both are also great additions to a guitarists setup.

Sorry to make this so confusing, but I don't want you to get the idea that this is a simple topic that anyone can give you a one or two line straight answer to.

-Greg



so basically its just a matter of preference, the two generally make the same idea of one sound, i get it im pretty sure.
#9
And wasn't the gain switch on early amps, before overdrive? Speculation from evidence, but the gain was before the master volume, and turning up the gain high enough would result in the tubes breaking up, creating distortion. Please correct me if I'm wrong, will check back tomorrow.

EDIT: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gain
So basically it's a volume control (I don't understand the physics, but I know from firsthand knowledge). I would imagine that higher amounts of gain break up the signal causing overdrive/ distortion.
Last edited by st.stephen at Apr 3, 2008,
#10
Yes, the gain control was originally just a volume control and distortion was considered an unwanted side effect of playing loud. However it was the pre-amp volume, meaning the higher this is, the bigger the signal is going through the power-amp and tubes e.t.c. resulting in distortion in a similar way as turning up the volume on your guitar results in more distortion.

as to pinch harmonics, use the treble pickup, dial in some more bass on your amp, make sure the volume control for that pickup is on 10.

If you want to sound like Zakk Wylde follow that advice and only do pinch harmonics on the low E and A strings.