#1
Hi, I'm still relatively new to playing guitar. That is to say I've played a few chords here and there and threw together what I know. Anyway, as I am still fairly new, there are quite a few concepts i have trouble with, and being that I have all this stuff to learn before im any good, I tend to get a bit frustrated with how much is in front of me, and how some lessons on here i still don't quite understand. The lessons are really good, I mean, alot of people have found them quite helpful. I understand some things, but there are concepts I'm really struggling with, for instance:

Eharmonics: I do get this a little bit, but i still don't get it completely.
Diotonics: I am so lost on this one. I really don't get it.

Could someone maybe break it down, the better for me to understand it?
#2
Quote by Newport420
Hi, I'm still relatively new to playing guitar. That is to say I've played a few chords here and there and threw together what I know. Anyway, as I am still fairly new, there are quite a few concepts i have trouble with, and being that I have all this stuff to learn before im any good, I tend to get a bit frustrated with how much is in front of me, and how some lessons on here i still don't quite understand. The lessons are really good, I mean, alot of people have found them quite helpful. I understand some things, but there are concepts I'm really struggling with, for instance:

Eharmonics: I do get this a little bit, but i still don't get it completely.
Diotonics: I am so lost on this one. I really don't get it.

Could someone maybe break it down, the better for me to understand it?
First off, RTFS

Enharmonics aret theoretically 2 different notes that have the same frequency and therefore sound the same. Like Ab and G#. Why are the notes different? Its got to do with note degrees and intervals. Do you know about scale formulas yet?

Diatonic means to only use 7 notes from a key. Usually refers to a type of instrument, like some harmonicas and some accordians which are only designed to play 7 notes (even if you can do some funky stuff to play chromatics on those babies).
#3
Enharmonics: when the same note is given the same name
eg A# and Bb are both played at the 6th fret of the E string.

Diatonic: This is a lot to explain (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diatonic), so I'll just say that for a scale to be diatonic it must contain each note letter-name (A, B...G) exactly once.
eg
D major (D E F# G A B C#) is diatonic
C harmonic minor (C D Eb F G Ab B) is diatonic
each letter is represented once (the sharps/flats don't matter)

Geddit?
My name is Andy
Quote by MudMartin
Only looking at music as math and theory, is like only looking at the love of your life as flesh and bone.

Swinging to the rhythm of the New World Order,
Counting bodies like sheep to the rhythm of the war drums
#4
Quote by Ænimus Prime
Enharmonics: when the same note is given the same name
eg A# and Bb are both played at the 6th fret of the E string.

Diatonic: This is a lot to explain (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diatonic), so I'll just say that for a scale to be diatonic it must contain each note letter-name (A, B...G) exactly once.
eg
D major (D E F# G A B C#) is diatonic
C harmonic minor (C D Eb F G Ab B) is diatonic
each letter is represented once (the sharps/flats don't matter)

Geddit?
All seven note scales and modes should only represent each letter once....
#5
Isn't that what I said?
My name is Andy
Quote by MudMartin
Only looking at music as math and theory, is like only looking at the love of your life as flesh and bone.

Swinging to the rhythm of the New World Order,
Counting bodies like sheep to the rhythm of the war drums