#1
Im buying some drum mics to track drums and wanna get your opinion on my choices. Im gonna use and SM57 for snare, some shure PG somethings for toms, the bass drum mic from that shure mic pac on the floor tom and a JTS bass drum mic. Are the PG drums mics any good? AND what should i buy for overheads? Im looking at some small diaphram condensers. Behringer C2s look good but cant be too good for 100 a pair. My bidget is MAX 200 each(i want a pair)

Thanks in advance, Mr Saturn.
#3
the Shure PG series are cheap mics and I would advise you stick with the SM57s for the toms.

The more you spend on mics, the better overall sound you will get and im sure if you buy cheap you will want to upgrade sooner.

http://www.tweakheadz.com/on_buying_studio_gear.html

for overheads look on ebay for a set of mxl 990 condensers.
Last edited by moody07747 at Apr 4, 2008,
#4
I was using the PG's on my toms and they sound great as long as you know how to EQ and know how to tune your drums. I use the bass kick mic out of the PG set currently and i think it sounds good, but I'm wanting to upgrade to the Shure Beta 52. SM57 for snare you can't go wrong with that. For overheads I am using audio technica studio cardioid, i'm not sure what they are I got them from a friend but i like the way they sound. I also use one MXL 990 for an overhead. The MXL 990's are good in my opinion and you can get them for way cheap on ebay. I've been looking at getting another one. Anyways hope this helps a little.
#5
Here's a fun fact about music gear:

Recommended applications are simply marketing tools.

You don't need a mic for every drum in a kit. If you can afford to buy 7 or 8 microphones just for your kit then go right ahead, but the benefits do not live up to the costs.

All I use is a kick drum mic and two overheads in stereo X/Y. I wouldn't mind buying a dedicated snare drum mic, but I don't think I need it, the snare cuts right through the mix without it.
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#6
Quote by moody07747
the Shure PG series are cheap mics and I would advise you stick with the SM57s for the toms.

The more you spend on mics, the better overall sound you will get and im sure if you buy cheap you will want to upgrade sooner.

http://www.tweakheadz.com/on_buying_studio_gear.html

for overheads look on ebay for a set of mxl 990 condensers.


PGs are the same as SMs except they are not built as tough. Sound-wise they are practically indentical.
#7
^ That's not what I have heard about the PG's. But then I have never actually used them first hand, so I can't really say.
There is poetry in despair.
#8
Quote by Mr. Saturn
PGs are the same as SMs except they are not built as tough. Sound-wise they are practically indentical.


I beg to differ.
#9
Quote by Muphin
Here's a fun fact about music gear:

Recommended applications are simply marketing tools.

You don't need a mic for every drum in a kit. If you can afford to buy 7 or 8 microphones just for your kit then go right ahead, but the benefits do not live up to the costs.

All I use is a kick drum mic and two overheads in stereo X/Y. I wouldn't mind buying a dedicated snare drum mic, but I don't think I need it, the snare cuts right through the mix without it.


+1000000
#10
Ehhhh.... fewer mics, or mics placed farther away on a kit means a roomier sound. Think jazz, or think 1950's rock. You will get best results in a good sounding room, but a bad sounding room will make this approach sound bad.

More mics give you more control over each drum and allows you to have each drum as in your face as you want it to be. The purpose for overhead mics is to supplement all the close mics so the drums don't sound like they were recorded in a phone booth. This technique is very forgiving of poor room acoustics.

Bottom line... your miking technique will be dependent upon what kind of drum sound you're looking for, and the room you're recording in may well make a big difference in how successful you are.

Suggested application is more than just a marketing tool. You'll never, ever see, for instance, a TLM103 recommended in ANY ad for use on snare drum. In fact, they will typically recommend NOT to use it for snare drum, lest risk popping it. Different mics, based on their physical configuration (dynamic, condensor, ribbon), diaphragm size, barrel shape, etc. are better at some things than others. Different tools for different jobs, as they say. This is where they get their suggested applications from.

I use as many mics as I can get away with most of the time, but that's because most of the projects I record are hard rock/pop or punk/hardcore. For hardcore, I'll bring the overheads up a fair bit to get that trashy open garage-type sound, while still allowing things like toms to hit you in the face.

My drum mic setup is pretty modest, but works well for me:
snare = SM57
kick = Sennheiser e602
overheads = Behringer ECM8000 (x2) - surprisingly good, esp for the price!
floor tom = SM58
other toms = whatever I have left.... SM58, Sennheiser e835, SM57, etc.
hats = some small-diaphragm AKG condensor... similar to a Rode NT5.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
Last edited by axemanchris at Apr 5, 2008,
#11
Do yourself a huge favor and get the AKG D112 kick mic. It is as standard on most kick drums nowadays as the SM57 is on the snare drum. I've had success with the PGs on the toms, but I haven't used my MXL 990 as an overhead... yet.
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#12
BTW, I would stay away from that Samson mic pack. I bought it. The only thing I use are the condensors and the tom mics, although the tom mics aren't that good either.
Quote by les_paul_01
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#13
The D112 and D12 mics have a very specific character. They both give a very 'clicky' sound to the kick. Awesome if that's the sound you're after. If it's not the sound you're after, then.... you'll hate it.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#14
We're after a metal/hardcore sound, big drums. Our drummer uses his tom/floor tom ALOT thats why i wanna mic each peice of the kit individually.
#15
Nah dude it isn't clicky, the Audix D6 is clicky. The D112 normally captures a good about of the beater but does a great job at catching the low-end too, though not as well as the Shure Beta52. Overall the D112 is the best kick mic.
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#16
I'm a tad impartial to the D112. I often find it gives me more bass than is needed, and is quite scooped in what is sometimes the wrong place. I'd rather have a mic that has a decent all around response where I can form the curve to my own will, not be a slave to the already present cut.
#17
That is a fair point, but I do like the sound of the D112, I think it's great for kick.
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