#1
Hey guys;

I have really gotten into writing non tonal (i.e. out of key) chord progressions recently, using modal interchange, notes from the relative minor, neopolitan chords, all sorts.

But anyway, I'm always looking for new ideas, so if you could post some non-tonal chord progressions I would be really grateful. They can be your favourite or ones that just spring to mind or whatever.

For example, a common one I've seen is I -> V -> VI -> iv

Thanks for your help in advance, guys!

Michal
#2
Foam Born: a) The Backtrack by Between the Buried and Me has an awesome chord progression:


C#|-------------|-------------|-------------|-------------|
G#|-------------|-------------|-------------|-------------|
 E|-8-8-8-8-8-8-|-3-3-3-3-3-3-|-4-4-4-4-4-4-|-1-1-1-1-1-1-|
 B|-9-9-9-9-9-9-|-5-5-5-5-5-5-|-6-6-6-6-6-6-|-2-2-2-2-2-2-|
F#|-9-9-9-9-9-9-|-6-6-6-6-6-6-|-6-6-6-6-6-6-|-2-2-2-2-2-2-|
C#|-7-7-7-7-7-7-|-3-3-3-3-3-3-|-4-4-4-4-4-4-|-0-0-0-0-0-0-|


So that goes G#, C, Fmin, and C#. The key of this part of the song is in C# major so the C should not be a major chord since it's the subtonic. But what they do is actually modulate to the key of C major during that second bar; it sounds really cool with another guitar and a synthesizer playing on top of these chords.

Not sure if that's the type of example you were looking for but I like it a lot
Last edited by rcw110131 at Apr 3, 2008,
#3
That's exactly the type of example I'm looking for, thanks dude, that really is an interesting chord progression!
#4
Switching between A natural and harmonic minor:
Am G F E7
Am C Dm E7

Switching between D major and D minor:
D A Bm G D A G Gm
I don't actually know what to call the Gm chord, but using pitch-axis-theory to get the Gm from the key of Dm sounds as good as anything to me.

Switching between D major and D minor:
D Bb C
#5
Atonal/non-tonal would mean that the progression doesn't have a tonal center. These are just out of key.

Anyway, I like iv's in major keys, secondary dominants, and diminished and augmented chords in various places. I found this while playin' around last night:

G D#dim7 Em C D7 G

The D#dim7 is fully diminished, just to be clear.
#6
it's called modal interchange, amazing jazz technique, check into it, its basically just jumping back and forth between parallel scales
Quote by beadhangingOne
There is no music but metal and muhammad is its prophet.
#7
Quote by bangoodcharlote
Switching between D major and D minor:
D A Bm G D A G Gm
I don't actually know what to call the Gm chord, but using pitch-axis-theory to get the Gm from the key of Dm sounds as good as anything to me.
That particular example looks like it's borrowing the A# from the relative harmonic minor, which seems pretty common in pop and stuff. IV iv I kinda progressions. Or I suppose it should be IV IVsus#2 I but it gets the job done either way.
#8
I don't know if this helps, but try downloading (err.. I mean buying) some Coltrane.
#9
Neopolitan chords are really fun to use now that I've finally learned how to handle them. I really like using 7th chords in my music, especially when substituting with the relative or parallel minor. the right progressions can really create some strong dissonance. Its really just a matter of taste though.
IMMORTAL DEATH

Before The Sun...
...After The Moon
#10
Quote by grampastumpy
That particular example looks like it's borrowing the A# from the relative harmonic minor, which seems pretty common in pop and stuff. IV iv I kinda progressions. Or I suppose it should be IV IVsus#2 I but it gets the job done either way.
I'd consider it easier to think of switching between D major and minor than D major and B Harmonic Minor.

I've always thought of it as borrowing the Bb of the Gm chord from the D natural minor scale.
#11
Quote by bangoodcharlote
I'd consider it easier to think of switching between D major and minor than D major and B Harmonic Minor.

I've always thought of it as borrowing the Bb of the Gm chord from the D natural minor scale.
I guess it's open for interpretation. I like seeing how other people interpret things and I imagine at least a couple others do too.