#1
Current setup:

Gear:
Peavey ValveKing 212
Paul Reed Smith Singlecut SE
Line 6 Uber Metal distortion
Line 6 Echo Park delay

Recording equip.:
Sennheiser 609 Mic
PreSonus Firebox Firewire Recording Interface

Anyhoo, my question is this: I'm trying to get the best sound out of my setup as I can, but I just can't seem to find it. When I'm recording, my guitar gets either too loud or too soft, and it always becomes very undistinguishable when I'm playing power chords or just harder music.

What kind of settings do you recommend for my amp/pedals, and what do you guys recommend for the actual physical process of recording? More specifically, where should I be placing the mic?
#2
for my recording i usally turn the trebal up to fit my bass and put the mic behind a pillow and if your program can lower the decibells
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#5
Let's hear a recording!

Play a Cort ?

Play with V-Picks ?

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#6
First of all, turn the amp down. The proper placement of the mic is halfway between the dome and edge of the speaker diaphragm. If your volume in inconsistent, might I suggest a compressor pedal.
#7
Quote by Circasurvive

and it always becomes very undistinguishable when I'm playing power chords or just harder music.


Your mic is great for guitar cabs, and your interface is good.

This quote, though, is a classic symptom of too much gain. Back off on the gain and see if that helps. Your ear from 15 feet away might not like it much, but you'll find that the mic an inch off the grille finds a big difference. Use less than you think you will need.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#10
Record it on tape, you'll like it much better.
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#11
Recording to tape is a not a magical solution to all recording problems. Stop pitching it as such. ****ty mic placement sounds just as bad on tape as it does on digital.
#12
Quote by MrPillow
Recording to tape is a not a magical solution to all recording problems. Stop pitching it as such. ****ty mic placement sounds just as bad on tape as it does on digital.


Whoa. Never said it was a magical solution, although there's no disputing the fact that guitars, especially with high gain, sound much better on tape.
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I love you, Muphin. You have great taste in music.

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#13
Thats an opinion, not a fact. Many people do not like the sound of tape saturation.
#14
Quote by slash-120
jeez its always tape vs digital, mac vs pc. haha


Well... I'm really the only one on this site who advocates analog tape over digital. If I had to use a computer to record, though, it would be a Linux machine.
Quote by Godzilla1969
I love you, Muphin. You have great taste in music.

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Muphin > You

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#15
If you're using the delay during recording, I'd leave it off and then process the signal with a plug in or something. As a few people have already said, turn down the gain. You might want to invest in another microphone, like a ribbon or large-diaphragm condenser, to fill out your guitar sound.
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#16
^ Many people like analogue. It's sometimes a case of convenience though, and there's no doubting the fact that analogue is both less convenient (particularly for beginners) and more expensive.


As for the original question, I would agree with the comment about gain. The gain shouldn't be as high for recording, as a general rule of thumb. And if it records too loud or soft, check the levels thoroughly before recording, and remember you can alter the volume in the DAW.
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#17
Quote by Muphin
Well... I'm really the only one on this site who advocates analog tape over digital. If I had to use a computer to record, though, it would be a Linux machine.


hate eternal (death metal) did one of their albums where all of their recordings went to tape first.

I'm unsure which album tho, i think it was I, Monarch

I'm guessing everything would have went to computer later, but the first take is the most important!

Quote by fridge_raider
As for the original question, I would agree with the comment about gain. The gain shouldn't be as high for recording, as a general rule of thumb. And if it records too loud or soft, check the levels thoroughly before recording, and remember you can alter the volume in the DAW.


Agreed, plus its not usually best to record at the loudest setting possible.. most music needs to have some dynamic breathing room, its usually best to record just a little quieter and then boost later..

if it too loud, well you can't unclip the sections that became distorted.
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Last edited by Kivarenn82 at Apr 7, 2008,
#18
But then at the same time, it's better to have to reduce the levels in your DAW rather than have to boost them. That's why you need to find the happy medium where nothing will clip, but you're still recording at a fairly high volume.
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#19
i figured that would have been implied. but you are correct sir, too low of levels won't sound full either, and may contain more noise if boosted later on.
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#20
Recording at 24-bit, you can get away with (and ideally SHOULD actually) record at surprisingly low peak levels. In the old days (er.... with tape), you needed (wanted) to hit the tape hard to get that nice warm tape compression. With 16 bit recording, you needed to get fairly good levels because of noise floor issues.

In 24-bit recording, the dynamic range is exponentially higher, which leads to among other things, a lower noise floor.

Now.... if you take an analog signal that peaks at 0dbfs and run that into a digital recorder using digital metering at unity gain (no raising/lowering of the original source signal), you will NOT see your digital meters reading peaks anywhere close to 0dbfs. Wha? That's right. Digital is different. You will see, instead, peaks hitting between -20 and -12db in your digital meters, depending on calibration of equipment, etc.

In other words, if you record with peaks hitting between -20 and -12, you will be way way way above anything resembling your noise floor; you'll still have TONS of headroom, and you will be, in fact, recording at a much more 'true' or 'traditional' input level.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.