#1
Anyone have any idea what scales you would play over this chord progression?

C7 Em Dsus2 Asus2 Em A7 Em
#5
i disagree there there is a drone of E on the high E and the C7 which has a b7th wich usually would imply mixo but probably not here because i believe it is Eminor
song stuck in my head today


#6
Quote by Bornlivedie UK
Mmm, looking for something that sounds quite dark and melancholy


The progression dictates the key/scale/mode. If you want something dark, build a dark progression. If the progression is in C major, use C major.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#7
Quote by Archeo Avis
The progression dictates the key/scale/mode. If you want something dark, build a dark progression. If the progression is in C major, use C major.


i understand you are saying this as an example the Cmaj thing


but i don't think it is Cmaj would you agree?
song stuck in my head today


#8
Quote by lbc_sublime
i understand you are saying this as an example the Cmaj thing


but i don't think it is Cmaj would you agree?


Assuming it resolves to C, it's just C major with a chromatic passing tone.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#9
Quote by Archeo Avis
Assuming it resolves to C, it's just C major with a chromatic passing tone.

if all these chords share an open would that be considered a drone? more defining they key?

being E?
song stuck in my head today


#10
Quote by lbc_sublime
if all these chords share an open would that be considered a drone? more defining they key?

being E?


Well, just because the voicings you are using happen to contain a droning note doesn't necessarily mean that all other voicings do.
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#11
true but i would put money on the fact that this progression does
song stuck in my head today


#12
I didn't notice that droning E note. Any ideas on another chord I could throw in there? What would you change about that progression?
#13
Quote by lbc_sublime
true but i would put money on the fact that this progression does

You'd "put money on the fact that this progression does" what?
#15
Quote by Bornlivedie UK
Anyone have any idea what scales you would play over this chord progression?

C7 Em Dsus2 Asus2 Em A7 Em
why dont you play a different mode on each chord? I'd suggest Mixolydian over the 7's, Dorian over the Em and either aeolian or dorian over those Dsus and Asus. Thats just what I would do.
#16
Quote by demonofthenight
why dont you play a different mode on each chord? I'd suggest Mixolydian over the 7's, Dorian over the Em and either aeolian or dorian over those Dsus and Asus. Thats just what I would do.


The progression isn't modal. Unless you're shifting tonal centers with each chord, you aren't really using modes. If you play the notes CDEFGAB over a G7 - C progression, you aren't playing mixolydian and ionian, it's just the major scale.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#17
The progression has a perfect cadence in E minor, so why not use E minor?
The progression is in E minor, not because it has a drone of E, but more because it has the perfect cadence (V-I) in that key. Nobody heard of dominant pedal?
#18
Quote by National_Anthem
The progression has a perfect cadence in E minor, so why not use E minor?
The progression is in E minor, not because it has a drone of E, but more because it has the perfect cadence (V-I) in that key. Nobody heard of dominant pedal?

EDIT: There's no V-I, A7-Em is a IV-I. The fact it's a seventh fooled you, and me too, apparently.

So yeah. I'd play C mixo over the first, obviously, which if you highlight the E and Bb, should give you a cool diminished feel leading into the Em. From there it's pretty obvious, I would personally use A phrygian dominant over the A7.

I strummed those chords on my acoustic, and for the record, it sounds really nice.
Last edited by bananaboy at Apr 4, 2008,
#19
Quote by bananaboy
This fellow knows what he's talking about. June 07 ftw.

The one issue I see is the C7, but you can use the weird note (Bb) to your advantage. Maybe imply some Locrian over the first chord, some Phrygian Dominant over the A7.

I strummed those chord on my acoustic, and for the record, it sounds really nice.


Meh, I use the Classical system, where the key signature defines whether the 7th is sharpened, flattened or whatever, so I took the C7 to be a major 7th chord, anyway.
#22
Quote by Bornlivedie UK
Im abit of a theory noob, so.. what's a perfect candence?


Do you understand the concept of triads? And would you know what I meant if I talked about chord I, or chord V, or chord vii?
#23
Quote by National_Anthem
Do you understand the concept of triads? And would you know what I meant if I talked about chord I, or chord V, or chord vii?


Yes I would, I do know some theory but it's quite basic.
#24
Quote by Bornlivedie UK
Yes I would, I do know some theory but it's quite basic.

Perfect cadence is V7 leading towards the I.

I think there's a classical rule that both should be in first inversion, but my experience with harmony deals more with jazzier type things, so I very rarely use just dominant 7ths. National Anthem should know, he seems like he knows what he's talking about.
Last edited by bananaboy at Apr 4, 2008,
#25
Quote by Bornlivedie UK
Yes I would, I do know some theory but it's quite basic.


Well. A cadence is just a way of ending a phrase, of ending it nicely, in short. It's from the Italian for tail, which is also the origin of "Cadenza". Cadenzas started as elaborated cadences, to demonstrate technical prowess on an instrument, but they soon developed into the epic 5 minute or longer affairs that they are now. Off-topic, but background info that's important, or interesting.

So. A Cadence is just a way of ending a phrase. Now; there's four basic ways of doing this:
Perfect (Chord V, Chord I) - The most common cadence, probably because its the most pleasing, and final sounding of the cadences.
Plagal (Chord IV, Chord I) - Often used in church music. Still final sounding, but more often used as a kind of "Amen" at the very end of a piece
Imperfect - any cadence ending on V, whether preceded by ii, IV, or I, or any other chord. This cadence sounds incomplete, or imperfect, as the name suggests. Not often used to end a piece; as it suggests that there is more to come
Interrupted (Chord V to any chord except I) - again incomplete sounding. Often described as weak, but not so; it's purpose is to build tension; like the Imperfect, but on a greater scale.
These are the European names for the Cadences, BTW. I know Americans have different names, I don't know what they are.
EDIT:
Quote by bananaboy
Perfect cadence is V7 leading towards the I.

I think there's a classical rule that both should be in first inversion, but my experience with harmony deals more with jazzier type things, so I very rarely use just dominant 7ths. National Anthem should know, he seems like he knows what he's talking about.


It doesn't have to V7, but it can be, and often is, to emphasise tension and release (dissonance and consonance in this case) that is so central to Western music. There's no rule about cadences being in first inversion in classical music, although some composers do use perfect cadences in inversion, or imply cadences in inversion, to weaken cadences and build suspense for a bigger cadence. ii7, ii6, or ii6/5 (ii 7in first inversion) are often used as predominant chords in perfect cadences, maybe that's what you're thinking of for the inversion thing? If not, no idea, sorry.
Last edited by National_Anthem at Apr 4, 2008,
#27
Quote by Bornlivedie UK
Ahh I see now, so the chord progression I posted ends in a perfect candence?


Yes, that's right. I hope I didn't make things too confusing.
#28
Quote by National_Anthem
Yes, that's right. I hope I didn't make things too confusing.


Wouldn't the A7 be a IV though?


I thought the chord numerals like that meant the scale degree that the chord was built off, isn't A the 4th scale degree in E minor?
#29
Quote by Bornlivedie UK
Wouldn't the A7 be a IV though?


I thought the chord numerals like that meant the scale degree that the chord was built off, isn't A the 4th scale degree in E minor?


****, you're right! Ah, that's embaressing. Well at least you understood!
#31
Quote by National_Anthem
****, you're right! Ah, that's embaressing. Well at least you understood!


ah good, thought I was missing something there :P
#32
Quote by Bornlivedie UK
ah good, thought I was missing something there :P


Did you understand the post about cadences, though? I hope I made it clear.
#33
Quote by National_Anthem
Did you understand the post about cadences, though? I hope I made it clear.


Yeah, thanks for the help
#34
yeah i saw that cause of

1 the drone of E

2 A7 has a 3 not a b3 which implies a major and the Asus 2 could go eihter way
song stuck in my head today


#35
Quote by lbc_sublime
yeah i saw that cause of

1 the drone of E

2 A7 has a 3 not a b3 which implies a major and the Asus 2 could go eihter way


The IV7 chord is found in the harmonised melodic minor scale.
#36
Quote by isaac_bandits
The IV7 chord is found in the harmonised melodic minor scale.



ahh i c
song stuck in my head today