#1
Hey everyone,

Quick question. I am getting a new electric guitar and will be playing through headphones for the time being due to noise constraints of my college dorm room. I am looking to pick up a good multi-fx pedal which will allow me to bypass an amp altogether. In the past, I had a Zoom GFX-707 that I liked alot until the input jack went bad on it.

During my research I came across some interesting software by Native Instruments called "Guitar Combos". This software looks pretty cool and seems to be a decent alternative to the standard multi-fx pedal. Anyone have opinions on this software? Is there anyway to hook up a pedal to it to manipulate fx like "wah"? I think it would be weird playing without a pedal under my foot after having done so for a number of years. I saw they offer a pedal type thing but it's like $200, so unless the software is AMAZING, I think I would be better of getting a traditional mulit-fx pedal.

If you don't think the software is worth it, what do you think would be a good multi-fx rig for my situation? Thanks in advance for any help you can offer.
#3
Quote by glowskulls
pod.

serial.

i love it.

i can get semi-close to a 5150 with out getting a job.


Does this have a built in pedal though? I didn't see one in the pics. That's why I asked about possibly hooking up a pedal to "Guitar Combos". The song "Bulls on Parade" comes to mind where a whammy effect with a pedal is needed. Maybe I am thinking about "Guitar Combos" all wrong and it's not meant for such things, but I know nothing about the software besides the fact it can model amps decently. Please help!
#4
No sorry, it doesn't, you can buy a shortboard for about 15-20 quid i think, i'm not sure wether it's got an expression pedal though.
#5
The problem with PC based emulation is that unless you already have an audio interface ($150), and a midi pedal ($100), it gets expensive. However, on the flipside you get the best emulation currently available in my opinion. I have played the PODs and the Boss and Vox emulators, and Guitar Rig (Guitar Combos is derived from it) blows them out of the water.
#6
The problem with PC based emulation is that unless you already have an audio interface ($150), and a midi pedal ($100), it gets expensive. However, on the flipside you get the best emulation currently available in my opinion. I have played the PODs and the Boss and Vox emulators, and Guitar Rig (Guitar Combos is derived from it) blows them out of the water.


Wow. I had no idea all this was needed. Could you elaborate on the function (and possible URL links) of each of these. Also, if I could live with not having a pedal, could I just hook up directly to my computer and bypass all the extra equipment?
#7
This may work too (for $150) is the DigiTech RP250. It is your audio interface, effects, and pedals all in one. May be a good as Guitar rig, but it has USB and a headphone jack. It comes with free X-Edit software and works well with Audacity which is also free source software.
again, may not be quite as good as some other options mentioned but i have been extremely happy.
Search on RP250 for my other posts on it as i seem to not be able to stop talking about it.
#8
Quote by Chipless
Wow. I had no idea all this was needed. Could you elaborate on the function (and possible URL links) of each of these. Also, if I could live with not having a pedal, could I just hook up directly to my computer and bypass all the extra equipment?


These are audio interfaces:
http://www.musiciansfriend.com/navigation/computer-hardware-recording-cards-audio-interfaces?N=100001+304891

Without one, your sound quality will be very poor, and you'll have to deal with 30+ milliseconds of lag, which is enough to make live practice impossible. You can definitely go without a floor pedal. I'm not currently using one due to my financial situation.

Another thing if your budget is tight is to use the demo version of Guitar Rig. The only limitations of the demo is that you can't save patches, and the software will shut itself down after 30min, but can be restarted as often as you want. If you are just using this for practice and can live with it, you can have all the amp and effect software (plus 60 or so patches) for free.
#9
Quote by jammin
These are audio interfaces:
http://www.musiciansfriend.com/navigation/computer-hardware-recording-cards-audio-interfaces?N=100001+304891

Without one, your sound quality will be very poor, and you'll have to deal with 30+ milliseconds of lag, which is enough to make live practice impossible. You can definitely go without a floor pedal. I'm not currently using one due to my financial situation.

Another thing if your budget is tight is to use the demo version of Guitar Rig. The only limitations of the demo is that you can't save patches, and the software will shut itself down after 30min, but can be restarted as often as you want. If you are just using this for practice and can live with it, you can have all the amp and effect software (plus 60 or so patches) for free.


Thanks for the info. I didn't even think about just using the demo but I could totally live with that for now. Just gotta figure out what audio interface to get now. . .